Settle an argument please

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Balto

Guest
I have a very old and simple. Ludwig pedal that you would probably like, from I think the 50's.
 
B

Balto

Guest
http://www.gak.co.uk/en/pearl-dcl-300p-drop-clutch/28719?gclid=CJDQgvHX3a8CFaImtAodI2JZvQ

This is the model I used. I think I still have it somewhere but I used it regularly for about eighteen months. The same period of time I regularly used both sides of my double pedal.

I just found it made the response sloppier. Nothing more to it than that. I like my clutch to be very direct and light - I prefer older styles of clutches that are much smaller than more modern ones. The lighter the hardware, the less it gets in the way of what I'm trying to do. It's the same with bass drum pedals, which is why I'm now playing a low-end Yamaha strap drive model over my DW5000.
I agree, the less moving weight, the better.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
http://www.gak.co.uk/en/pearl-dcl-300p-drop-clutch/28719?gclid=CJDQgvHX3a8CFaImtAodI2JZvQ

This is the model I used. I think I still have it somewhere but I used it regularly for about eighteen months. The same period of time I regularly used both sides of my double pedal.

I just found it made the response sloppier. Nothing more to it than that. I like my clutch to be very direct and light - I prefer older styles of clutches that are much smaller than more modern ones. The lighter the hardware, the less it gets in the way of what I'm trying to do. It's the same with bass drum pedals, which is why I'm now playing a low-end Yamaha strap drive model over my DW5000.
 
B

Balto

Guest
I tend to find you lose the feel of the hi hat with drop clutches. I've owned the Pearl model and it did the job fine but I didn't like the way it changed the hi hat response. Then again, I'm altering my hi hat by tiny amounts constantly when I play so it does make a difference.
If you have it set up right there shouldn't be any difference in feel. I think everyone that plays drums properly uses varying degrees of pressure with their hi hat pedal.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
I tend to find you lose the feel of the hi hat with drop clutches. I've owned the Pearl model and it did the job fine but I didn't like the way it changed the hi hat response. Then again, I'm altering my hi hat by tiny amounts constantly when I play so it does make a difference.
 
B

Balto

Guest
Totally agree, hence my comment regarding springs at rest position :)



Definitely so, I use a 13" top K cymbal on my hi-hat stand, it's fairly lightweight, when I release my foot from the hi-hat pedal it actually goes into the rest position, such is the setting tension of the spring, therefore there's no need to loosen the top hat, I'll have to find the "right" opening the next time I play, so it's time saving as well, and an open hi-hat doesn't make any noise, unlike a snare buzz, which I agree can be annoying :)
I have Pearl drop clutches on all my hats. All I do is step on the pedal when I sit down , and, ta da, right back where it was before. :)
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Regarding bass drum springs, there is no need to release them, because their natural resting position is to have minimal tension on them.
Totally agree, hence my comment regarding springs at rest position :)

I suppose the springs in any good quality hat are good enough to sustain the pound or two of weight from the top hat indefinitely.
Definitely so, I use a 13" top K cymbal on my hi-hat stand, it's fairly lightweight, when I release my foot from the hi-hat pedal it actually goes into the rest position, such is the setting tension of the spring, therefore there's no need to loosen the top hat, I'll have to find the "right" opening the next time I play, so it's time saving as well, and an open hi-hat doesn't make any noise, unlike a snare buzz, which I agree can be annoying :)
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Do you release the springs on your bass drum pedals? I doubt it... :))

The solicitation of a spring leads to wear and tear, a resting spring, in whatever position, is not solicitated, thereof, not subject to wear and tear :)

My current hi-hat stand and cymbals is over 25 years old, I always leave it open, unless I'm taking the drums down for gigs, never had a problem, I never had to change or correct any settings, and it's working fine... the same applies to my bass drum pedals, I had a Camco for 28 years, never had to change the spring :)

When you release the top cymbal on a hi-hat stand, the rod goes into full open position :)

I guess it's more of a habit than an actual benefit in regards to the life of the springs, no one's right or wrong, it's down to personal taste and belief in the matter :))
Regarding bass drum springs, there is no need to release them, because their natural resting position is to have minimal tension on them.

I suppose the springs in any good quality hat are good enough to sustain the pound or two of weight from the top hat indefinitely. I just loosen my top hat as a habit, ditto with the snare throwoff. Once I left my kit in a practice room and a guitarist tried to release the throwoff to stop buzzing and he bent the throwoff level outward, with considerable effort, in an oafish effort to silence the snare. The less attention your gear draws to itself, the better.
 

drummerman42

Senior Member
I sometimes turn off the snare's when I'm done playing simply because, it's a habit! I agree with was stated earlier, it probably won't extend the life of the strainer or the throw-off since it's constantly in motion. probably will wear out quicker! As for the hi-hat, I don't drop the top hat simply because to me it's annoying to find where I had it placed in the beginning!
 

shambo

Member
I share a kit with my 9 year old son. You never know what you may find. I just cross my fingers and hope for the best. I have come home to all my drums detuned. I wasn't mad. I was happy he was exploring tuning options
Now that's funny.

I guess I'm stuck on the idea that you don't hit the snare at least once before starting the first song. No John Bonham Tribute Triplets before you dive in?
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I often turn my snares off when I play, either to get that nice woody tone or to avoid detracting from quiet drumless passages. So it's obviously second nature for me to check the snares.

But drummers who always leave their snares engaged are more likely to be caught with their snares down in this situation.

Darwin in action ... /joking/
 

Coldhardsteel

Gold Member
I generally disengage my snares when not in use because they're getting a bit old nowadays and I need to draw out their life span a bit longer. I release my high-hat clutch because the pole that the clutch rests on has enough wear on it already.

Just check the snares before you play, it's not difficult or a nuisance.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
this is from a Drum:Magazine drum care article:


Whether you move the drum a lot or it stays in one place, leave the throw-off in the on position. The snares and bottom head are less likely to get damaged when the wires are tight against the head
 
B

Balto

Guest
Do you release the springs on your bass drum pedals? I doubt it... :))

The solicitation of a spring leads to wear and tear, a resting spring, in whatever position, is not solicitated, thereof, not subject to wear and tear :)

My current hi-hat stand and cymbals is over 25 years old, I always leave it open, unless I'm taking the drums down for gigs, never had a problem, I never had to change or correct any settings, and it's working fine... the same applies to my bass drum pedals, I had a Camco for 28 years, never had to change the spring :)

When you release the top cymbal on a hi-hat stand, the rod goes into full open position :)

I guess it's more of a habit than an actual benefit in regards to the life of the springs, no one's right or wrong, it's down to personal taste and belief in the matter :))
I will just repeat what I said below!
"I think like most questions on here, some are going to do it, and some aren't, and most everyone won't change there mind by anything that is said in this thread!"
 
B

Balto

Guest
The spring on the hi hat is at rest when it is up. Loosening the clutch so that the top hat sits on the bottom hat does nothing. Most snare releases have no spring only a cam or other pressure device.
The snares are a group of springs that are stretched when it is activated. I was not talking about the throw itself. There is tension on the hi hat spring from the weight of the top hat. The heavier the top hat the more tension on the spring from the down rod, pushing downwards, from the weight of the top hat. It isn't much, but it is there.
I think like most questions on here, some are going to do it, and some aren't, and most everyone won't change there mind by anything that is said in this thread!
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Well a spring at rest should keep its shape better than one that is being stretched for long periods of time.
Do you release the springs on your bass drum pedals? I doubt it... :))

The solicitation of a spring leads to wear and tear, a resting spring, in whatever position, is not solicitated, thereof, not subject to wear and tear :)

My current hi-hat stand and cymbals is over 25 years old, I always leave it open, unless I'm taking the drums down for gigs, never had a problem, I never had to change or correct any settings, and it's working fine... the same applies to my bass drum pedals, I had a Camco for 28 years, never had to change the spring :)

When you release the top cymbal on a hi-hat stand, the rod goes into full open position :)

I guess it's more of a habit than an actual benefit in regards to the life of the springs, no one's right or wrong, it's down to personal taste and belief in the matter :))
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
The spring on the hi hat is at rest when it is up. Loosening the clutch so that the top hat sits on the bottom hat does nothing. Most snare releases have no spring only a cam or other pressure device.
 
B

Balto

Guest
Well a spring at rest should keep its shape better than one that is being stretched for long periods of time.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Quote....His rationale for disengaging them is it extends the life of the snares and the bottom head.

His made question had to do with the above and not whether the buzz was annoying during an organ solo. Turning them off then is only common sense. But there is no proof that turning them off while not in use will prolong their life.
 
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