Self-Doubt

Davo-London

Gold Member
Actually, the odd mistake or two is quickly forgotten. Far worse is to be considered to be dragging, speeding up or generally not playing the song.

Peace
Davo
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
One thing that helped me when I'm too self-critical is I think about when other members of the group flub up, I really don't care...
Following on from that, foster a culture where a noticed mistake is cause for a smile between players, not a death stare.

I've learnt that rehearsing and learning songs really well isn't so that nobody makes mistakes - people will always make mistakes - it's so that when a mistake does happen, the band can paper over the crack quickly and effortlessly.
 

jimb

Member
I think all musicians suffer from this to some extent..I know I did as a bass player. Thing is few people if any will notice even the biggest howler...unless that is you come in a clean half beat behind or in front of the band, that type of thing.
Taking a vid is usually a good idea..gives you some sense of how ur doing.
 

Mustion

Senior Member
Put on one of your favourite albums and listen, I mean really listen, closely to each part. I'm willing to bet you dollars to donuts that under intense scrutiny, each and every musician on that album made at least one "mistake" - at least according to them.
When people started posting those isolated drum/bass/guitar tracks on YT of legendary songs, I sure noticed some blemishes that I didn't before.

Don't forget that being in an ensemble, you're part of a mix...
 

Lennytoons

Senior Member
Go listen to some early Rolling Stones recordings. Charlie Watts made mistakes that have been recorded for posterity. Still, he's a great drummer and unless you know where the mistakes are you'd never know the difference.
 

TMe

Senior Member
Self criticism is great, until it's not. Too much of a good thing is not a good thing. If it's starting to hinder, rather than help, dial it down a bit.

Would you judge another drummer as harshly? Then why judge yourself so harshly? To quote Stanley Bing, "You're as special as the next guy."
 

Mustion

Senior Member
Go listen to some early Rolling Stones recordings. Charlie Watts made mistakes that have been recorded for posterity. Still, he's a great drummer and unless you know where the mistakes are you'd never know the difference.
Start Me Up...

Yeesh, even Tony Williams made an obvious (to a drummer) flub on one Stanley Clarke album I have. Part of being a human, not all quantized and protoolsed to irigidity...
 

Chollyred

Senior Member
Just when you think it's safe to go back into the water...You can be playing and on top of the world, then you drop a stick, or, catch the underside of the hats, or a guitarist misses chord and it throws your timing off slightly. As long as you recover quickly, most people will never notice. A recording will catch it, but as long as it's not a frequent occurrence, nobody will care.
 

Jbravo

Senior Member
Since I started playing around 1978, I’m guessing I’ve played 2200-2500 shows, mostly 3 or 4 sets (45 minutes or 1 hour) each. Probably 85% of those were on bass, but the point is the same.

I always try to play my best, but if I or someone in the band screws up I take it in stride, and don’t glare or point fingers. And honestly, I’ve probably made at least small mistakes at every show I’ve played.

No one is perfect, and the fate of the world doesn’t hang in the balance if there’s a mistake whether is the drummer, bassist, or anyone else.

A lot bigger threat to you being an effective entertainer is preventing yourself from becoming bored or burnt out so you just don’t care.

That’s where I was with playing bass and singing, so after much though, I quit the band, and took up drums again. I’m much happier musically now. If I sit in with someone occasionally I’m not in the least worried by minor mistakes, I enjoy the moment.

If I agonized over the possibility of not being perfect I’d have quit playing long ago! Loosen up and have fun!
 
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