Seating Arrangement and finding the BPM

Drummer4jesus1993

Junior Member
Anyone know how to sit so your high-hat, snare, and bass is perfect where you won't feel uncomfortable with it being to close or being to far?

Also I started writing notations for songs I'm learning, and I been having a hard time finding the BPM, because when I count it out with the music on and turn it off and put on my metronome i feel I'm off when I'm counting when finding the exact BPM. Any advice on finding the correct BPM?
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
Anyone know how to sit so your high-hat, snare, and bass is perfect where you won't feel uncomfortable with it being to close or being to far?
I've been trying to solve that problem since 1972! I move my Hat stand, Snare, and Throne several times during a session!
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Anyone know how to sit so your high-hat, snare, and bass is perfect where you won't feel uncomfortable with it being to close or being to far?

Also I started writing notations for songs I'm learning, and I been having a hard time finding the BPM, because when I count it out with the music on and turn it off and put on my metronome i feel I'm off when I'm counting when finding the exact BPM. Any advice on finding the correct BPM?
OK the first problem: Measure your thigh in inches, multiply it by the square root of 3, and subtract your total height in inches. That will give you the number of inches that the middle of your foot should be to the middle of your hi hat pedal, at a 40 degree angle measured perpendicularly from the middle of your right thigh bone.

The 2nd problem, is you need to learn to count in time like a machine

Welcome to DW and don't believe everything you read, especially this.


The real answers are that only YOU can determine where the best placement of your snare, hats and kick pedal should be. That's like asking, what is the best suit size to get. Obviously we all have differing sizes of various appendages and kit placement is an extremely personal preference. As far as the BPM's for the music you're trying to notate, play the music, turn on the metronome, and try to adjust the tempo of the metronome to play perfect quarter notes right along with the music. When it sounds right, see what BPM it's set at and that should do it.

Sorry for the wiseguy post, just feeling a little snarky tonight. Welcome to DrummerWorld. I hope you know what you're getting into here.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I just play the song in Winamp and then adjust my metronome until it's as close a match as possible. A lot of trial and error.

Getting everything in the most comfortable position is another thing that involves a lot of trial and error.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Also I started writing notations for songs I'm learning, and I been having a hard time finding the BPM, because when I count it out with the music on and turn it off and put on my metronome i feel I'm off when I'm counting when finding the exact BPM. Any advice on finding the correct BPM?
I'd say have the music going at the same time as the metronome.
From there it's trial and error to get them to line up.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
Can you imagine how great a drummers life would be if a great sounding, playable snare drum could be made in the shape of a triangle?
 

donv

Silver Member
I'd say have the music going at the same time as the metronome.
From there it's trial and error to get them to line up.
Yup.

Just a suggestion but once you get in the right area, divide appropriately and count by measures rather then BPM. Any individual drummers groove nuance may not interfere with finding the proper BPM as much. It's also sometimes easier to find BPM from the bass or guitar player rather then the drummer. With some music counting by the guitar riffs rather then the drummer can be easier.
 

rogue_drummer

Gold Member
I've been playing for years and I STILL move my hats, snare, and toms around. Don't be afraid to experiment. One day you will have them set one way, the very next day you will want to move them. Don't sweat it!! We all do it.

Welcome to the forum!!!
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
That my friend is how new products are birthed.
I actually gave the idea some thought today as I was gutting my kitchen for remodeling. I believe that it could be done. Having the heads made would be the greatest challenge.
If the drum was made with a rounded corner triangle shape, It would probably work.

JPW posted a simple solution with the electro drum idea, But that would be like cheating! LOL!

If I wasn't so busy remodeling the kitchen so that my wife doesn't poison me and bury me in the garden! I would be building the prototype!

I just realized! This stupid bobdadruma post puts me at 1000! I made it! I'll probably be banned for thinking such blasphemous things as a triangle drum! Bernhard will send some enforcers to collect me, torture me, and they will make me denounce my crazy ideas!
 

donv

Silver Member
I actually gave the idea some thought today as I was gutting my kitchen for remodeling. I believe that it could be done. Having the heads made would be the greatest challenge.
If the drum was made with a rounded corner triangle shape, It would probably work.

JPW posted a simple solution with the electro drum idea, But that would be like cheating! LOL!

If I wasn't so busy remodeling the kitchen so that my wife doesn't poison me and bury me in the garden! I would be building the prototype!
Back in the 70's there was a drum company that made a kit with an oval bass drum. Don't remember the name of the company, but heads in odd shapes apparantly can be done so as you say, the head wouldn't be a problem.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
Back in the 70's there was a drum company that made a kit with an oval bass drum. Don't remember the name of the company, but heads in odd shapes apparantly can be done so as you say, the head wouldn't be a problem.
Yea, Thats right, I think that fibes made it. They made elbow shaped toms also with round batter heads and odd shaped openings on what would be the reso end. The drums had no resos.
 

what the funk of it

Senior Member
I'm surprised no one has mentioned the tap tempo function included on most clicks I've used. Just tap along to the beat of the song and voila - there's your BPM.
 

thelimpingtoad

Senior Member
I'm surprised no one has mentioned the tap tempo function included on most clicks I've used. Just tap along to the beat of the song and voila - there's your BPM.
Yeah me too... I was wondering the same thing.

I have software metronome that i created that has a TAP function.

Download my Metronome (for windows) if you'd like to try it out: Download Here
Requires the .Net framework download from here

The metronome isn't perfect but the tap function will get you very close to the correct BPM of the song. Just click the tap button on the quarter notes while listening to a song and keep tapping it for a few measures. Then click the "ok" button under the "tap" button. it records and averages the amount of time between each click of the mouse and returns the beats per minute. :)

"Tap" functionality is only found on higher-end metronomes that i've seen... they cost like $50... you won't find it on the cheapo $10 metronomes.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Bob, you're gonna need triangular cases too, that could be a subsidary company. Also there's triagular counter hoops, so you're gonna need a foundry or metal shop too...
Oh congratulations on the 1000. You're officially a drum geek now.
 

Curly

Junior Member
Just reading about moving the traps and gear to fit. Its just a feeling you have when its all working for ya. Try to make it the same all the time. You might get close. Here is one for all drummers to try.
++++++=========

On the way to Las Vegas to do a job, the Band leader suggested, "I think Curly should stand while playing drums" ?????? It will look so good. We argued for about an hour and didnt settle any thing.

When we were setting up, Band leader sez, " I want you standing up Curly" No practice no rehearsal and no adjustments.

I started with the Floor Tom on the right as high as I could get it so I was not bending over to play.

The Bass drum was set closer than normal and the Two upper toms were set Flat as far as the hardware could make it.

Two Symbals were set Flat and level with my chest. As far as hardware could stand.

The High hats were locked and raised as far as hardware could go, so I could reach them.

I had to stand and lean on my left leg and thigh and lean into the Bass drum pedel.

Then the Snare was pulled up as far as the Stand could go and it was just a bit too low and
my back was bent over just a bit while playing.

My mic stand was on a swivel, goose neck and stuck up in my face.

I could not reach my drum stick bag that was hanging on my bass drum.

My drum throan was set aside off the band stand.

They both said, man that looks sharp....... I spent four hours with cramps in my left leg
and no one listening to what I was saying. After each song I had to straighten up and walk in place to get the Blood back in my left leg.

The Gig lasted Two weeks........ I gave them my notice. When this gig is over,
So am I.......... The let me set down after that.........

Where do they come from???

Now back to the practice Pad. Oh , I ordered some Metal sticks to try.
I may have some metal sticks for sale soon..... Curly
 

jonescrusher

Pioneer Member
It's a good question about drum placement. Disregarding the stupid posts, most people here seem never to settle on one way of setting up. I've been the same, although i'm honing in one, as not getting it right seems to have a bad effect on the night's playing.

Start by placing your stool in position. Try a height where your knees are bent at an angle slightly obtuse to 90 degrees.
Place the bass drum in position so your leg is neither stretching to reach nor pushed back.
Do the same for the hihat. Aim to have both legs comfortably apart, not so close that the inside of your knees are scraping the snare drum.

The snare should be in a position where the tip of the stick strikes the centre of the drum and your elbows are relaxed and to your sides. If the snare is too close the elbows will be pushed back behind your body, to far and you'll have to hold the elbows out in front of you.

It's all a matter of ergonomics. Listen to your body over a practice session. If any part of your limbs are aching, or worse still cramping, then try moving that piece of the kit into a place that accomodates the natural resting position of the limb. Everything should remain comfortable, however long or hard you play.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Curly great story. It's always fun to laugh at others misery ha ha. Man I would never have agreed to that. Maybe if the guy who wanted me to do it stood on his head while playing or singing or whatever.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
The drum kit is an awkward instrument to set up and play. The drum kit player is taking the place of four or more people in a concert band. Hence the issues of seating and placement arise.
The more hardware that you have, the more complicated this is. A set up that is right for one song, isn't right for another. What feels comfortable today, won't feel comfortable the next day. It is an endless enigma of possibilities! I have changed the configuration of my kit so many times that I can't even remember half of them.
Here is a link to another thread. http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=49115&highlight=drumming+prejudices
 
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