School of Rock for drums?

rockinar

Junior Member
Anyone familiar with School of Rock? I'm looking to learn to play drums and it seems like it might be a good place to get started and at least get the fundamentals down and pointed in the right direction.

My understanding is you do a weekly individual 1 hour lesson and a "group rehearsal which I think is a nice touch to help push you along a bit.

I've looked around for private lesson but can't find much other than teachers for kids and....Guitar Center which I understand is more about selling you lesson packages.

Thoughts?
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Playing with others is a big help, but it's also important to have some direction before doing that. Private lessons are a good idea, and Guitar Center is an option. I'd also check other music stores in your area and compare teachers. You want someone who's an experienced drummer, but they should also be an experienced teacher.

Bermuda
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
What area are you in? I teach at a studio that has student rock bands, both for kids and for adults, but this is pretty rare for a local teaching studio. The place is not part of the "School of Rock" chain, so we do things differently. The bands are small (3 to 6 members) and you don't share the drummer role with anyone else -- you are the only drummer for your band.

My understanding is you do a weekly individual 1 hour lesson and a "group rehearsal which I think is a nice touch to help push you along a bit.
You're absolutely correct! It's a HUGE motivator, at any age. Compared to places I've taught that don't have student bands, the students study for longer, have much more fun, and generally progress farther and faster. If you are brand new to the instrument (i.e. never touched a kit), then it might be a good idea to just take private lessons for 3-6 months, to get a handle on the basics, before you jump in with a band. But don't wait too long -- get in there an hack it up ASAP! :)
 

rockinar

Junior Member
Playing with others is a big help, but it's also important to have some direction before doing that. Private lessons are a good idea, and Guitar Center is an option. I'd also check other music stores in your area and compare teachers. You want someone who's an experienced drummer, but they should also be an experienced teacher.

Bermuda
Guitar Center is like 5 minutes from my house and it would be really convenient. But I read they teach from the Hal Leonard lesson books which is not ideal. But I guess its better than nothing? School of Rock about 15-20 minutes away and they have an adult program.

I may set up an appointment at School of Rock and see what they say. They have a free "trial". I'm guessing that's a short lesson?
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
They do a School of Rock course here in the UK or Rock School. Think it's a college course here, would that be night school in the US? Exactly the same as you describe it. Individual lessons with a lot of focus on playing in a group. Wish that was around when I was a kid!

As for individual lessons, do your homework and get someone who has good recommendations. Big stores will try and flog you bulk lessons. Try drumeo online. Tonnes of lessons on youtube now. If you're worried about GC regurgitating a book steer clear, worse lessons ever! I depped for a teaching school that did exactly this, I was shocked they were ripping people off.

Like others have said, learn to walk before you run, don't be the guy who joins a band but can't play their instrument. Leave that to bass players! Not fair on you or any other musicians you'll be grouped with.
 

Frosticles

Silver Member
Like others have said, learn to walk before you run, don't be the guy who joins a band but can't play their instrument. Leave that to bass players! Not fair on you or any other musicians you'll be grouped with.
Some of the best songs ever written were by bands that "Couldn't play"
My advice (Following what I did) Go out there & enjoy yourself with likeminded people regardless of your level. I think far too many now rely on proficiency over enthusiasm.
The most fun bands I have ever been in have been the one's with limited ability. :)
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Some of the best songs ever written were by bands that "Couldn't play"
My advice (Following what I did) Go out there & enjoy yourself with likeminded people regardless of your level. I think far too many now rely on proficiency over enthusiasm.
The most fun bands I have ever been in have been the one's with limited ability. :)
I think we may have differing tastes and opinions regarding best songs ever written and that's totally cool, discussion best saved for over a few beers :)

Totally agree with the like minded people bit, shame it takes a bit more work these days and yet we live in an age where we're all connected apparently?
 

Frosticles

Silver Member
I think we may have differing tastes and opinions regarding best songs ever written and that's totally cool, discussion best saved for over a few beers :)

Totally agree with the like minded people bit, shame it takes a bit more work these days and yet we live in an age where we're all connected apparently?
On for a beer :)

There's a lad that I know that won't get involved with other musicians because he is too scared that he will be out of his depth. He is a very competent drummer but because he hasn't qualifications he thinks he is inferior. Have been trying to tell him for a while now just to forget this & get out there.
The stress of lessons & down thinking on yourself because you can't nail that quadruple paradiddle diddle is making youngsters life a misery in some cases.
Knackers to the stress, The future of music relies on fresh idea's & it should be enjoyable.
We have made a very good career out of not being able to play "Properly" & have made countless records & have toured the world constantly having immense fun doing so.
This is what I am trying to tell him.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
On for a beer :)

There's a lad that I know that won't get involved with other musicians because he is too scared that he will be out of his depth. He is a very competent drummer but because he hasn't qualifications he thinks he is inferior. Have been trying to tell him for a while now just to forget this & get out there.
The stress of lessons & down thinking on yourself because you can't nail that quadruple paradiddle diddle is making youngsters life a misery in some cases.
Knackers to the stress, The future of music relies on fresh idea's & it should be enjoyable.
Sounds like your mate is afraid of failing. It happens to the best of us, all part of the learning curve.

I failed auditions in my younger days for bands I wouldn't waste my time on now but back then I was hungry to get out there. Makes you a stronger person and a better musician because if you take it the right way you come back stronger.

Re lessons, kids aren't taught money beats aka your straight beats, shuffles, latin, jazz. For rock and pop this is your bread and butter. (Big hint OP!). You can buy rudiment books and go through them on your own.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
If you are brand new to the drums, it may be worth your while to have an experienced drummer in the area come over and show you how to best set up your drum set so it's the most ergonomic for you.

If you are really wanting to seek out a teacher, I'd be sure to figure out what your goals are for playing and then find a teacher who specializes in whatever your goal is.

If it were me? Man, there's so much YouTube out there, I'd just get an ipad (or better yet, a big flat screen TV and a RoKu) and a good set of headphones and go crazy.
 

tjohnson

Junior Member
My search from drum instruction led me to take lesson from the best teachers in the area (I could find) which happened to be at a School of Rock. My entire adult musical experience is tied to lessons and the Adult Program (5 shows completed, in 6th now) over the past 3 years. I would definitely recommend the overall school and their programs.

However, it's always dependent on the people. I was pushed towards the adult program and started one with only 3 months of drum lesson experience under my belt. I couldn't think of any quicker way to go from zero to playing in front of people that was available to me.

I did switch instructors twice. Once because while I felt I connected with him well he wasn't able to provide instruction in a manner I best consume it (i.e. fantastic play, okay teacher for my learning style) and once more because my instructor was also the Adult program leader and I felt our sessions were focused more on the show than my personal development as a player which I felt was terribly important to keep separate.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
My search from drum instruction led me to take lesson from the best teachers in the area (I could find) which happened to be at a School of Rock. My entire adult musical experience is tied to lessons and the Adult Program (5 shows completed, in 6th now) over the past 3 years. I would definitely recommend the overall school and their programs.

However, it's always dependent on the people. I was pushed towards the adult program and started one with only 3 months of drum lesson experience under my belt. I couldn't think of any quicker way to go from zero to playing in front of people that was available to me.

I did switch instructors twice. Once because while I felt I connected with him well he wasn't able to provide instruction in a manner I best consume it (i.e. fantastic play, okay teacher for my learning style) and once more because my instructor was also the Adult program leader and I felt our sessions were focused more on the show than my personal development as a player which I felt was terribly important to keep separate.
Cool to hear about this from the other side!

It's definitely true that in an ensemble-based program, you spend lots of time learning tunes, and it can seem like the more theoretical and universal aspects of the instrument get sidelined. I definitely make an effort to go back to "drummier" lesson material when my students have just finished a gig and don't have lots of songs to worry about. That's when we'll cover rudiments, coordination, subdividing, independence, and so on. Much of the time, students are learning specific beats and fills for songs. And yes, some of those things are song-specific, and not widely applicable.

But in the end, it's all very much related. For example, you're not going to have a ton of success with The New Breed, if you haven't first learned a lot of songs and played them live. The fundamentals of time-keeping, rhythmic awareness, the technique you develop while playing, etc. -- they make the more intellectual content much easier to conquer. Also, students are more willing to practice, because they better understand how those concepts relate to actual music-making on the kit.
 
Just wanted to say, I like the advice from Frosticles; "Go out there & enjoy yourself with likeminded people regardless of your level". And as a drummer of three years, (whom practices alone) I am finally doing that, by "auditioning and jamming with different people". I like punk music and the drumming sounds of Rancid and Social Distortion as influences. The last guy I jammed with wanted a Travis Barker drum sound. Which I can't pull off, nor am I interested in trying to master that guys style. So, we decided to not work together. Nonetheless, I plan to keep practicing and keep looking for new people to play with. Thanks for the good advice, it's keeping me inspired to keep getting out there.
 

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
I'm Sr. Drum Instructor and Show Director at School of Rock in Burbank, CA.

We teach students of all ages and skill levels. I can honestly say it's one of the best teaching gig's I've ever had. The regular weekly lessons I conduct like any other traditional lesson would be. Rudiments, Method Books, Technique, Yada Yada... But the performance program REALLY helps. It provides you with the experience of playing in a working band. Definitely a huge plus!

I'd be happy to answer any questions you have if you want to DM me.
 

Frosticles

Silver Member
Just wanted to say, I like the advice from Frosticles; "Go out there & enjoy yourself with likeminded people regardless of your level". And as a drummer of three years, (whom practices alone) I am finally doing that, by "auditioning and jamming with different people". I like punk music and the drumming sounds of Rancid and Social Distortion as influences. The last guy I jammed with wanted a Travis Barker drum sound. Which I can't pull off, nor am I interested in trying to master that guys style. So, we decided to not work together. Nonetheless, I plan to keep practicing and keep looking for new people to play with. Thanks for the good advice, it's keeping me inspired to keep getting out there.
Thank you :) When I was younger, I went through a few Punk bands, Usually just local ones. I finally ended up joining the band I am still playing with (The Varukers) after I supported them with a local band & we got talking afterwards. 2 months later, I was their drummer. That was in 1986!!!
Definitely try to develop your own style & sound if you can as it will make you stand out. I tend to shy away from any "Influences" even though I do have them.
It's great that you are getting yourself out there & also having fun. To me, this is the most important part of playing. The more people you know, the more opportunities will come your way :)
Makes me very happy to hear this from someone.
 

bonerpizza

Silver Member
I teach lessons at a local Guitar Center and while it's encouraged that we teach from the Hal Leonard book I personally only take that route if that's the route the student wants to take, I'd rather teach you in a way that is effective and enjoyable for you.

You can sign up for a trial lesson at Guitar Center and it's basically a free 15-20 minute lesson where you get some very basic instruction and get to know the teacher, get a feel for how they teach and you can see if you click or not. I'd recommend signing up for a trial lesson and seeing how it goes.

If you're in the Austin TX area come visit me at the GC in Round Rock, I'm there every Saturday!!
 
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