Room temp/humidity

dnt

Member
Hey, everyone -

Our finished basement where I plan to put my new kit stays noticeably cooler than the rest of the house. I believe this due, in part, to the simple fact that it's a basement AND that there's a kegerator down there than came with the place when we bought it. I guess the question is, how cool is too cool for the room your drums will be in...and what about humidity levels? Thanks!
 

Chollyred

Senior Member
Temperature is not as big a concern as the humidity. Many basements have enough moisture where mold will set in. If this is a possibility in your basement, you may want to invest in a dehumidifier to help dry it out. Since you say it's a finished basement, I'm guessing you have not had any issues with mold? If not, probably nothing to worry about.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Basements tend to be cooler than outdoor ambient in the summer. You have the ~51-degree ground temp fighting against the ambient temp, which usually increases humidity.

Instrument storage is typically recommended at 50% humidity. This can be impossible or prohibitively expensive in a basement during the summer months.

You can compromise like I do, and have a ~60/pt/day dehumidifier with a hose leading to a sealed/capped sump pump. Dehumidifier's humidistat is set to 60%, which is low enough to avoid mildew, and high enough that it doesn't run flat-out all summer long. If you don't have a sump, you're going to have to commit to emptying the bucket once a day.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
If the kit is out and being played, it's probably fine.

One user here said he put silica pellet packs in each drum, to keep them dry while cased up. But this is for storage.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Instrument storage is typically recommended at 50% humidity. This can be impossible or prohibitively expensive in a basement during the summer months.
Isn't this the recommendation for classical instruments? Cello, double bass, voilin, etc. have one single, thin, wood ply. Wouldn't that recommendation be too strict for drum shells, which usually have multiple plies, and are therefore much less susceptible to change in shape due to humidity?

Of course it's a good idea to keep mold and mildew away. But a wrapped or lacquer drum will do just fine, as long as it isn't wet, or left in heat. Single ply drums should be okay, too, since that single ply is usually very thick, and probably has re-rings for added strength.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Isn't this the recommendation for classical instruments? Cello, double bass, voilin, etc. have one single, thin, wood ply. Wouldn't that recommendation be too strict for drum shells, which usually have multiple plies, and are therefore much less susceptible to change in shape due to humidity?
50% is an ideal target. It's for all wood instruments.

The problem is... You're not going to get 50% in a Tennessee basement. Not without a huge dehumidifier or a building with active/engineered basement ventilation.

60% is achievable on a mortal's budget.

 

force3005

Silver Member
Hi DNT. Sonor recommends, that you do not expose your drums and hardware to extreme temperature and humidity fluctuations. Storage would be perfect in stable room conditions of approximately a temperature 70ºF and humidity of 55%.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Out of the elements it's rapid changes that are the issue, not the temp and humidity in and of itself. Humidity would be the worst offender of the two. If the temp doesn't offend your body then your kit has much higher tolerance.

Obviously, there are ideals, like the furniture standards mentioned by others.

Drummers shuldn'r experience may issues due to weather. Guitar necks and to a higher degree bass necks is a different matter. Not a big deal using one's own transport that either, it's a bigger issue when flying.
 

rain dog

Member
somewhere between 50% and 60%. temperature does not matter but in the winter a heater will reduce humidity too. it also helps to run a fan.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
FWIW I place one of these in my storage closet where I keep my gear and empty the water out regularly, they work pretty well. I have to do this account of living in a humid subtropical region of N. America.
 
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