Report from the dark side ;)

keep it simple

Platinum Member
I'll come back here with more detail & replies later (a bit busy right now :( Until then, take a listen to this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7lm7a27d68&feature=youtu.be

Kit taken out of a roasting hot car, set up, & played, so tuning isn't exactly optimum. Typical close mic vibe - desk run flat. We tried two other kits at the same tuning, slightly bigger sizes. One was a high end kit from a mystery manufacturer ;), the other one being the £80 Pearl. Of course, the poor old Pearl didn't come close, but nor did the other high end kit. Heads, tuning, & PA quality aside, you could really hear the difference. Sorry, I don't have footage of the other two kits.
 

Davo-London

Gold Member
Great post Andy.

The short decay you mention makes a lot of sense in a live multi-instrument setting - so how does this translate into tuning? Someone mentioned tuning the reso up a fourth but you also mentioned slightly lower tunings. Any tips here?

Andy, did you get any compliments/comments from the drummers?

Davo
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Great post Andy.

The short decay you mention makes a lot of sense in a live multi-instrument setting - so how does this translate into tuning? Someone mentioned tuning the reso up a fourth but you also mentioned slightly lower tunings. Any tips here?

Andy, did you get any compliments/comments from the drummers?

Davo
Thanks Dave - good questions :)

If there is one crude blanket piece of advice for getting a weighty tuneful tone for close micing live, it's batter down, reso up. Of course, there's a ton of caveats attached to that, but if your drums or tuning skills aren't that good, that basic approach stands a good chance of giving the engineer something to work with.

For those who are more experienced, yes, reso up a perfect 4th is a good rule of thumb for toms in that application. For those wanting a medium head sustain but full shell involvement (essentially, a default live setting), & you've got a Tunebot, take your preferred batter head lug frequency in Hz, & x it by 23% to get the reso head lug frequency. On bass drum, x the batter head lug frequency x 50% to get the reso head lug frequency. This is Andy's default setting for drums with good resonance performance. On thicker shells or otherwise not very resonant shells, the effect is less impressive, but still a great starting point.

I usually tune by ear, but in cases where I want repeatability, or the environment is just too damn noisy, I will use the tuner. That said, my ears are way more reliable for listening through overtones ;)

As for compliments received - yes. Every drummer, without exception (& other band members too) loved their sound. Some actually gushing profusely over it ;) I can only imagine many of them rarely get an engineer who works with them at a musical level, & puts a lot of concentration into stage sound balance.

This is an excellent thread (taking notes...) - thanks for sharing on this info, Andy.
My pleasure, & if any of this helps, then I'm happy :)
 
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