reissues versus vintage

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
While browsing a local music shop today it made me wonder why a Reissue guitar (no specific brand names) or even a say " 73 Strat are asking / fetching way more then say a mint Ludwig "59 Super 400 or other similar drums. Is it that drummers are tight or that guitarists are gullible. "59 Les Paul Reissue = Megabucks .. '59 Ludwig Super 400 = $1200 more or less. thoughts?
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I suppose vintage gear is worth what someone is willing to pay for it. Collectors will pay 5 figues for a 50s strat or Les Paul.

Mr Starkey just made a cool £1.6m from a black oyster downbeat. No cymbals or snare included either. Bit steep!

The real noggin scratcher for me in the guitar world is pre aged road worn guitars or guitars that have been chucked about a bit in the factory. How do you get into that job? I could be wrong but pre road worn drums just wouldn't catch on.

The guitarists I know aren't gullible and shop smart but I suppose with every instrument you'll always get the 'all the gear, no idea' crowd/spoilt rich kids.
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
Maybe guitarists bestow more love on their instrument.

Drummers don't seem to care about drums.
They share them with other drummers they don't know. They don't put them in cases. They mummify the sound with all sorts of tape and they tell each other that drums are not nearly as important as cymbals.

Plus, if you look at the construction of old drums they often look like they were made by drunks.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
While browsing a local music shop today it made me wonder why a Reissue guitar (no specific brand names) or even a say " 73 Strat are asking / fetching way more then say a mint Ludwig "59 Super 400 or other similar drums. Is it that drummers are tight or that guitarists are gullible. "59 Les Paul Reissue = Megabucks .. '59 Ludwig Super 400 = $1200 more or less. thoughts?
This is a good question and you make a good point.

But please, don't pursue this line of thinking too far and try to change any minds. We don't want to spoil a good thing.
We, well at least I, like the idea of low cost vintage drums. Some day I want to own a set of 1940's Slingerland Radio King drums.


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GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Ask members of a symphony orchestra what they paid for some of their string instruments. Drums pale in comparison. I remember reading that a cellist left her million dollar cello in a cab. As was said, things are worth what they sell for. My son when young, that would be Grunter, used to get excited about baseball cards and beer cans we collected, telling me what they were worth. Only when sold I said. I have never seen an antique drum, or vintage drum for sale for 1 million. There are no Stradivarius drum makers.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
We, well at least I, like the idea of low cost vintage drums. Some day I want to own a set of 1940's Slingerland Radio King drums.


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I missed out on some a couple of years ago on Classic Drums. It was a players quality kit with a couple of mods but who cares I'm not a collector and they'd get gigged!

The sizes were 24/13/16 and they wanted £750 for the kit, the year of it was 1948? I think they were on the site for all of 20 minutes if that.

It's mad to think someone made £750 that day but lost both arms in the process :)

My Drum Teacher at Uni had a 1930s Slingerland RK kit and snare that he got for £600 in the late 80s/early 90s but he had a Yammy 9000 that went everywhere and was talked about in hushed tones by everyone.

I'd love a WMP RK 26/13/16/18 (not sure if they made an 18 ft) I miss having a 26 bass drum!
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
The answer to this question is not in the sound of vintage guitars and drums.

I think a guitar player can get a vintage sound out of a new guitar. Especially considering all of the electronic effects that are available.
And I think I can get a vintage drum sound out of certain types of new drum sets that are available.

But here is one BIG thing that affects the price of vintage gear.
If a guitar player is on stage playing a vintage 59’ Les Paul, many musicians and others will think Wow! Too cool.
You know how the video cameras are always doing close ups of the guitar and the guitar player’s hands.

But if a drummer is sitting on stage behind a 1940 Radio King drum set, who would notice? Maybe a couple of drummers in the audience will notice.
And you will never see the video cameras do a close up of the drums.


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KamaK

Platinum Member
A 61 Stratocaster will sound and feel different from a 2016 Stratocaster in the same way that a 60's COB Supraphonic will sound and feel different from a 2016 Ludalloy Supraphonic.

In the mid 90's, I got tired of taking my 61 Strat on the road with me. I searched high and low for a good reissue to replace it on stage. I ended up with a G&L Legacy because I couldn't find the real deal. These days, I can walk into almost any Fender dealer and pick up a 61 reissue (or have it ordered and delivered to my door in 5 days).

On the flip side, Gibson will never reissue my 75 Les Paul Deluxe (Or any other Pancake constructed LP for that matter).

I'm as puzzled as everyone else over the entire pre-distressed Relic guitars that are being released. Why anyone would get a pre-ruined guitar challenges my imagination.
 
M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
While browsing a local music shop today it made me wonder why a Reissue guitar (no specific brand names) or even a say " 73 Strat are asking / fetching way more then say a mint Ludwig "59 Super 400 or other similar drums. Is it that drummers are tight or that guitarists are gullible. "59 Les Paul Reissue = Megabucks .. '59 Ludwig Super 400 = $1200 more or less. thoughts?
That's just how that market works. Guitars are more iconic and fetch more. Drums are like furniture and fetch what they do. So yeah, guitar collectors are probably the more gullible because the only reason prices are high is because somebody will pay it. Those idiots ;)
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
To me, it's about the specs. I had a 2008 SG Std with a fat neck that I couldn't bond with, so when I discovered that the '61 re-issue SG had the '60s slim profile neck, I made the switch. It had nothing to do with any desire to go retro, and Gibson didn't try to make it look old.

I don't know much about the Fender Road Worn guitars, but bass players seem to really dig the P and J basses because they're so light and resonant, despite the hokey distressed look. Again, specs are the driver.

I can see drums being the same way. Vintage Ludwigs definitely have their fans so it's not surprising that Ludwig would re-issue a 3-ply shell made to the old specs.

Re-issues seem like a pretty good idea if you dig the old instruments but would rather have something newer.

Of course, vintage has the advantage of aged wood and historical mojo, so there's that.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
No one is going to hold a concert where all of the big stars show up to play the 100 anniversary model of any drum brand, but I do remember a huge concert/show when fender made the century mark. Every guitar player on the planet was there playing some model of Strat or such. Two different breeds.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Could it be that vintage guitars sound amazing and your average old drums sound like garbage?

Hear me out before getting out the rotten tomatoes!

I know there are the vintage drums that everyone loves that sound great! I mean, the old round-badge Gretsch drums are VERY sought after as are some vintage Ludwigs. But besides these (and maybe some others I missed), most older drums just sound like cr@p as compared to newer drums. I'm blown away at what a person can get now for the money, especially the used market. I'll take my Basix birch kit over any stencil kit any day of the week. A lot of stencil kits just fell apart they were so bad. The kick drum spurs are a joke as are many of the flimsy cymbal stands and other hardware. I know there are collectors that really love this stuff, but come on man, a lot of that stuff will break by just looking at it. If those old stencil kits sounded really, really good then sure, I bet they'd be worth a lot more.

I really do believe that we are in the golden age of drum building.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
A 61 Stratocaster will sound and feel different from a 2016 Stratocaster in the same way that a 60's COB Supraphonic will sound and feel different from a 2016 Ludalloy Supraphonic.

In the mid 90's, I got tired of taking my 61 Strat on the road with me. I searched high and low for a good reissue to replace it on stage. I ended up with a G&L Legacy because I couldn't find the real deal. These days, I can walk into almost any Fender dealer and pick up a 61 reissue (or have it ordered and delivered to my door in 5 days).
Please, finish the story. Would the 61 reissue sound like your original 61 ?


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KamaK

Platinum Member
Please, finish the story. Would the 61 reissue sound like your original 61 ?
My sister-in-law has a 61 reissue that is so close to my 61 that the only difference is the road wear and dents. It's as if they came off the same line.

Same goes for the 57-reissue Stratocaster that I tried. It feels, pays, and sounds almost exactly like the real thing.

The only difference I can really comment on is that the pickups on the reissues are not quite as microphonic. This is likely due to more-consistent winding and fresh wax.
 
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