recording session

MikeM

Platinum Member
I've liked and listened to many musically unpolished "real punk" bands and I never saw it as a bad thing if maybe they'd practice a little bit and learn to play their instruments.
Back in '88 someone had the decency to turn me on to Scratch Acid. Wow, great players (drums and bass especially). They're on tour right now. If you can, see them before they give up the ghost for good.
 

Devils Haircut

Senior Member
Call me bitter, I kinda grew up on GD as a local band, back when they had more angst than talent and they weren't playing pop music showcasing a sense of growth and maturity as songwriters to the very people they claimed disdain for.
^^^Fixed it for you ;)

I'll never get why "real punk" has to sound like a Guitar Center after school lets out. I've liked and listened to many musically unpolished "real punk" bands and I never saw it as a bad thing if maybe they'd practice a little bit and learn to play their instruments.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
First off, that's entirely subjective and we could debate the merits of GD elsewhere. But more importantly, there are tons of "punk" bands that have used clicks and gotten away with it. GD was only used as an example because they're famous enough for most on here to have heard them and to provide context.
Call me bitter, I kinda grew up on GD as a local band, back when they were good and they weren't playing crap pop music to the very people they claimed disdain for.
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
I'll point out that as far as "punk" goes, GD currently has some of the most stale, over-produced, pop-y, un-punk feeling music out there.
First off, that's entirely subjective and we could debate the merits of GD elsewhere. But more importantly, there are tons of "punk" bands that have used clicks and gotten away with it. GD was only used as an example because they're famous enough for most on here to have heard them and to provide context.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I could say that a punk rock band doesn't need a click, but then Green Day (for example) always uses one.
I'll point out that as far as "punk" goes, GD currently has some of the most stale, over-produced, pop-y, un-punk feeling music out there.
 

last man to bat

Senior Member
I would suggest exercises that promote continuity of playing. Running over rudiments would help with this since 16 16th notes will be required for each bar of 4/4. This will go a long way toward understanding the sticking required to make sure fills add up properly. Learning to read charts will help to visually cement the idea that structure and a certain predictability is important. And in this case, it's probably not a bad idea to put on some headphones and start playing along to some covers until they can be done without a huge number of mistakes.
Thanks Mike, that makes a lot of sense.
 

mikel

Platinum Member
Jakester.

Dont sweat it. If you and the rest of the band are happy with the way you all play, just go for it.
We cant all be pro or session drummers. The main thing is to enjoy the process. If you go in full of tension cos you are not used to a click, then dont use one, cos you wont have time to practice enough with a click to get used to it before hand.
Stay in your comfort zone.
Have you done any band rehersal recordings? If you like the feel of them then just go with that feel. If you try to change too much in a short space of time the wheels will come off.

If the studio is booked, do your songs the way you feel comfortable. Check them out over the next few weeks, then decide what you want to mix/keep.
If you then feel timekeeping is an issue you can then do as the guys below advise and practice rudiments and work with a click till you are comfortable. Then give it another go.

Best of luck, and ENJOY.
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
Mike, just out of interest what practice/exercises would you suggest he does to help him sort out the issues that you pointed to?
I would suggest exercises that promote continuity of playing. Running over rudiments would help with this since 16 16th notes will be required for each bar of 4/4. This will go a long way toward understanding the sticking required to make sure fills add up properly. Learning to read charts will help to visually cement the idea that structure and a certain predictability is important. And in this case, it's probably not a bad idea to put on some headphones and start playing along to some covers until they can be done without a huge number of mistakes.

It just sounds to me like there's this drumming going on that doesn't have any direction and at this point I can't conceive of a musical genre where it would be fitting. But like I said, I think there is some potential there - I just don't think he needs to be reinventing the wheel as much as he is. Studios are an unforgiving environment. Once you commit something to tape, it's there for the ages. You really want to put down drumming that's not only to the best of your ability, but that meets the needs of the music.
 
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last man to bat

Senior Member
I don't mean to pile it on here, but more than some simple practice with a click, you need to find some lessons because it's not just that you're time is drifting; you're ideas are all over the place. You have potential, but I think it would be well worth your time and money to find someone to show you some exercises and other concepts to work on, then practice those to a click. Once you got a more solid grounding, you'll be ready for recording. Studios tend to be expensive. I think rushing into it will just be setting yourself up for a frustrating experience.
Mike, just out of interest what practice/exercises would you suggest he does to help him sort out the issues that you pointed to?
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
I don't mean to pile it on here, but more than some simple practice with a click, you need to find some lessons because it's not just that you're time is drifting; you're ideas are all over the place. You have potential, but I think it would be well worth your time and money to find someone to show you some exercises and other concepts to work on, then practice those to a click. Once you got a more solid grounding, you'll be ready for recording. Studios tend to be expensive. I think rushing into it will just be setting yourself up for a frustrating experience.
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
That's not delay from the phone, that's delay from your foot.

I haven't spent three years doing a degree that involves music technology and studio recording for nothing, you understand.

Towards the end of the video for instance there are timing issues with the guitarist when you go on to the toms. Your left hand and your right foot aren't matching up at all. You need to actually listen to this.
 

jakester

Senior Member
i actually do but like i said the video was from my phone and it was on my bass drum so it had a little delay in it so it isn't the best thats one reason were recording
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
Jakester, do you work with a metronome often? I can hear a wandering time, particularly with your bass drum.
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
Wow, 6-8 sounds pretty ambitious to me. You'll be accepting more mistakes the more songs you try just due to time constraints. It's not a terrible idea, though. Take them all and listen for a week or two. Then decide which 4 or 5 you want to bother mixing. Rerecord the others again next time.

Are you planning on recording with the click? It can make editing from different takes easier. Actually, depending on tempo variations (even small ones) it might not even be possible otherwise. But if you do, you may end up paying a "feel penalty" as a band. Depends on what kind of music your doing, what kind of vibe you're going for, and how comfortable everyone is (especially you) with it.

I know some engineers/producers (Jack Endino chief among them) that much prefer recording bands without clicks. He lets the band do whatever they want, but after recording a couple thousand bands over the last few decades, he won't think twice about advising against it if asked. Some people see them as sterilizing training wheels while others see them as keeping the drummer honest.

I'm somewhere in the middle. I've done both so I'd have to say that it really comes down to the band. I could say that a punk rock band doesn't need a click, but then Green Day (for example) always uses one. Other bands have skipped it where I think they should have used one - Stone Temple Pilots comes to mind (I don't care for that imprecise lackadaisical feel). YMMV
 
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