Ready to Jam and everyone else is still tuning.

Anon La Ply

Renegade
Then they put their expensive guitars on their stands, all exposed and stuff, and place it like 1" from the drum construction zone? So if I knock it it's my fault.
Boy do I relate to this one. I've lost count of the number of times I've tiptoed past vulnerable guitars on stands set up, as you say, right near the throne.

Duncan, I sympathise with Dre ... when people do all their catching up in studio time I think they deserve to be drummed at. We've had 3 hour "rehearsals" where chit chat takes up an hour to an hour and a half, and that was when I couldn't play at home - that was all my playing for the week. So I have no qualms about playing when a few of the guys go motor mouth - if I can, I try to corrupt our guitar player into having a quiet jam.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
Talking too much during rehearsals is very irritating, I'll admit. Especially if it's about something tangential and irrelevant - granted that is annoying.

Why not just focus the band and get on with it rather than noodling? If you're noodling, you're actually adding to the 'chatter' that's going on and prolonging it. The most effective way to deal with the chatter is to simply look at one of the other musicians (bassist or guitarist) and say:

'From the top then?'

And count them in.

At that point, others quite often scramble to their instruments and start playing. If you want to practice your drums, practice them separately and not at band practice.
 

Thud

Senior Member
Some people spend ridiculous amounts of time tuning. You'd think they had been playing long enough to get it right by now. Then the noodling starts.
The problem I have with noodlers is you never get a moments quiet. As soon as the band stops the noodling starts and continues until we count the next one in. It means 3 hours of solid noise, never a moment's peace. I hate it.

The other thing that raises my eyebrows is these dudes who are constantly fiddling with the mixer controls. They have such a feather light touch and sensitive ear that nobody else can hear the difference.
If you look closely at the knob it doesn't actually move...
 

topgun2021

Gold Member
If a drummer wanted to end a conversation at a rehearsal, couldn't we just play so loud that no one can hear? That would surely stop people talking.
 

AndyMC

Senior Member
If a drummer wanted to end a conversation at a rehearsal, couldn't we just play so loud that no one can hear? That would surely stop people talking.
Absolutely, I've done this on occasion when it gets out of hand. Fair warning though if you start messing around at all your being a real dick, try asking nicely before you make a racket and you'll usually get a smile from at least one band member when you start going crazy and everyone stares.

Practice in your time not the bands, rehearsal is about going over songs to sound better, not learning how to play them. If you can only practice at rehearsal you have a problem and need to find time or you are being selfish.

Finding a mature group of people to jam with that are still fun isn't easy, but the joys of a smooth practice session cannot come often enough.
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
I had a classic a coupla weeks ago. Three guys coming over to think about putting a project together and jam a bit. The guitarist bums a ride because his crappy old car died, he bummed a smoke as soon as he got there, and noodled through every conversation.
Classic rock-n-roll meet-up.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
I had a classic a coupla weeks ago. Three guys coming over to think about putting a project together and jam a bit. The guitarist bums a ride because his crappy old car died, he bummed a smoke as soon as he got there, and noodled through every conversation.
Classic rock-n-roll meet-up.
I could deal with the lift, I could deal with the cigarette.

By the end of the night, I would have put a cigarette through him via the windscreen of the car.
 

radman

Senior Member
Guitars are usually the worst "noodlers" in my experience. After working with some jazz guys for quite a while - usually without a guitarist - the oldie-but-goodie joke arose:

How do you get a guitarist to shut up?

Put a piece of sheet music in front of them.

ba doom boop.

toodles,
radman
 

sonnygrabber

Senior Member
Noodling to me is unacceptable....but I rarely do rehearsals and the bands I am in are quite professional type folks at gigs.

There is that issue of tuning and switching guitars between songs tho, and I get grumpy if there is dead air for more than say 45 seconds. If folks are dancing they need to be kept that way, and no amount of talking/telling jokes will help the matter.

So my bands and I have come up with various gestures or signs that indicate a longer break is needed for the "tuning song" or gear swappage. This allows the rhythm section, (its always the guitar player isn't it?), to jam on various predetermined feels, (i.e. a jazzy 2, a rhumba, a salsa, a bossa, etc). Can create some great spontaneous noises too.
 

RockNGrohl

Senior Member
Then they put their expensive guitars on their stands, all exposed and stuff, and place it like 1" from the drum construction zone? So if I knock it it's my fault. I am always thinking of giving the others as much space as possible by rough assembling my stuff off stage and bringing it up in the logical order so my stuff doesn't take up onstage real estate. (unless it's a huge stage) It's just simple human etiquette, nothing to do with music really.

I like when people help you load in and you have to move it all because they placed it right where you are setting up. Lol.
I know right? I played in band a few years ago. I quickly learned that every venue we'd play had a stage too small for our four member band. Bass/vocal, drums, guitar, guitar/vocal. Three amps, two mics and drums, with P.A. speakers on stands on the sides. They'd book us and then we'd find out how tight we had to cram all our stuff in on their tiny stage! Combo amps, too, I might add.. I had a talk with the frontman, the singer/guitarist and joked with him about it. We measured my kit set up and he made a note of leaving that much in between the amps. But we'd never get that much room!

We even played a cable access music show once, they really wanted us to be the Rock Band test subjects in their little acoustic world. We found out much to our dismay that the little room they filmed in couldn't house all of us and our gear as well as their cameras and lights. Ugh! All three of them were right in front of me knocking about my cymbal, yes one.. I stayed behind my drums because I couldn't get out! Thankfully I'm not claustrophobic! Long story short it was all a mess. I watched the dvd they gave us and you never see me, until the guitar player bends down to re-plug his lead in that he stepped on and pulled out.. When they finally moved out after filming I was all sweaty and could exhale again! whew!
 
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