Question about EV RE-20 kick drum mic application

cdrums21

Gold Member
I just re-purchased an Electrovoice RE-20 kick drum mic (I used to have one years ago and sold it). I forget what position the bass roll off switch should be in for miking my kick drum. For anyone who knows or uses one, should it be in the "flat' or "tilted' position? Also, any suggestions on mic placement for the best sound? I know I'll be experimenting, but some insight would be helpful. Thanks in advance!
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
Any more info about it? I wouldn't generally advise using a bass rolloff switch for a bass drum mic, you want all the bass you can capture usually. Probably 'flat'.
 
A

audiotech

Guest
Everything depends on the size of the bass drum, the heads, its tuning, ported or unported and the room itself. Even the type of beater will directly affect the sound of the drum and where the microphone should be placed. As you probably know, the RE20 was designed to alleviate most of the proximity effect associated with similar cardioid type microphones, so unless it's needed I would run the RE20 flat. I know the way I position them, but you may not get the same results because no two circumstances are ever the same. The best way is to experiment with not only the placement in relation to the diameter of the drum, but the distance between the microphone and the drum itself. Even though there is very little proximity effect, the distance can make or break the sound you're trying to achieve. The microphone has to "see" the area of the drum head that will be most advantageous to the recording or reinforcement. A lot of times I might also use a secondary microphone looking at the batter head for more attack. It's all up to you.

This may work for you, but you'll probably need to experiment and season to taste. BTW, I also like to shock mount most of my mics around the kit, it makes a world of difference.







Dennis
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Can't add too much to that. But in some instances where I'm using the RE20 on a bass drum, the bass roll off switch is mainly there to keep frequencies that are lower than the bass drum's freqs from getting back to the console. In a live situation this could be the bass player, or low freq vibrations from people walking across the stage, etc.,... Although it's a bass drum, it's frequencies aren't as low as we think. Other freqs that are lower will tend to cause feedback, in a live situation, anyway.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Everything depends on the size of the bass drum, the heads, its tuning, ported or unported and the room itself. Even the type of beater will directly affect the sound of the drum and where the microphone should be placed. As you probably know, the RE20 was designed to alleviate most of the proximity effect associated with similar cardioid type microphones, so unless it's needed I would run the RE20 flat. I know the way I position them, but you may not get the same results because no two circumstances are ever the same. The best way is to experiment with not only the placement in relation to the diameter of the drum, but the distance between the microphone and the drum itself. Even though there is very little proximity effect, the distance can make or break the sound you're trying to achieve. The microphone has to "see" the area of the drum head that will be most advantageous to the recording or reinforcement. A lot of times I might also use a secondary microphone looking at the batter head for more attack. It's all up to you.

This may work for you, but you'll probably need to experiment and season to taste. BTW, I also like to shock mount most of my mics around the kit, it makes a world of difference.

Dennis
Dennis, any chance of putting up a recording capture that relates to these pictures? Thanks, Andy.
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
Cool, thanks for all the input thus far. I should have mentioned that the mic will be used in a live situation with a ported kick drum. Normally with the mic that is currently being used on the kick, they place the front of the mic just inside the hole pointing toward the beater impact spot. That seems to work well with that particular mic. If I'm not mistaken, I used to mic my kick the same way back in the day when I used the RE-20. I believe I just placed the front end of the mic just inside the resonant head, about and inch or two, pointing the mic toward the beater and that worked out well. I will experiment with mic placement for sure, I was mainly wondering about the bass roll off switch and if there was a "standard" placement of how far into the drum to put the mic. Thanks again guys!
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
I spy a U87 in one of Audiotech's pictures.

That's exciting...
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
Can't add too much to that. But in some instances where I'm using the RE20 on a bass drum, the bass roll off switch is mainly there to keep frequencies that are lower than the bass drum's freqs from getting back to the console. In a live situation this could be the bass player, or low freq vibrations from people walking across the stage, etc.,... Although it's a bass drum, it's frequencies aren't as low as we think. Other freqs that are lower will tend to cause feedback, in a live situation, anyway.
Depends on your drum, I have a 26" where the fundamental note is 40Hz or possibly even lower!
 
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