Providing drums at a gig

Bokatron

Member
Hey all, got my first gig next week on Friday the 13th.

Being my first gig im a little unexperienced in the scene of things.

Our friends band who are headliners got us the slot but the venue doesnt have a house kit so someone had to offer their own, i gladly offered as id prefer to use my own kit and i can move stuff about the way i like them without worrying, obviously the other drummers will bring cymbals and snare.

I suppose the question im asking is has anyone had any bad experiences from providing the kits?

The kit im using is a Pearl EXR so its not mega expensive but that doesnt mean i want it trashed, its my baby at the moment haha!

Also will i need to have a hole in the front of my kick drum for the mics?

Thanks a lot


Must add, the headliners drummer would have provided but he has no car at the moment so its awkward to get his kit down.
 

danthevan

Junior Member
How big is the venue? Unless it's massive, then you probably won't need to mic the kick drum.
As for lending your kit, i think it's pretty standard practice that if you break it, you fix it.
I would say that 'most' experienced drummers will respect other peoples kit though?
 

jim_gregory

Senior Member
Nobody cares about your gear like you do. Plan on new heads and fresh dings from snare banging into tom etc. If you plan on these things you may be surprised in a good way if they dont happen. But you wont be so upset if they do. I have an old sessions kit with an indestructable wrap for shared gigs and rowdy bars. Aslo if you can before the show MAKE SHURE they bring their own cymbals etc. because almost without fail someone won't. Frankly if it's still possible I would bang someone elses drums anytime. I KNOW I won't beat the snot out of them.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Nobody cares about your gear like you do.
That's true, although you just said you wouldn't "beat the snot" out of them (classy :), and I know that if I was using someone else's kit I'd be careful.

There are plenty of considerate drummers around but there are also some real cowboys. The state of rehearsal room hire kits is testimony to that.

Yes Bokatron, get them to bring their own cymbals. Some people on this forum have said they put old heads on the kit if they know others are going to be using it, which seems like a good idea.
 

jim_gregory

Senior Member
That's true, although you just said you wouldn't "beat the snot" out of them (classy :), and I know that if I was using someone else's kit I'd be careful.

There are plenty of considerate drummers around but there are also some real cowboys. The state of rehearsal room hire kits is testimony to that.

Yes Bokatron, get them to bring their own cymbals. Some people on this forum have said they put old heads on the kit if they know others are going to be using it, which seems like a good idea.
I think these are kid bands. Now not so say kids are inconsiderate but they simply do not know yet how to NOT break things yet. I have a long painfull expensive history of breaking things which is how I learned to NOT break things. I think you get what I am saying?
But sadly there are also some people who will never get it and just dont care about other peoples property. Of course many of those types dont survive long enough to reach maturity.
If I were playing some one elses kit, to be clear, I would treat it better then my own. I think you would as well.
 
W

wy yung

Guest
Hey all, got my first gig next week on Friday the 13th.

Being my first gig im a little unexperienced in the scene of things.

Our friends band who are headliners got us the slot but the venue doesnt have a house kit so someone had to offer their own, i gladly offered as id prefer to use my own kit and i can move stuff about the way i like them without worrying, obviously the other drummers will bring cymbals and snare.

I suppose the question im asking is has anyone had any bad experiences from providing the kits?

The kit im using is a Pearl EXR so its not mega expensive but that doesnt mean i want it trashed, its my baby at the moment haha!

Also will i need to have a hole in the front of my kick drum for the mics?

Thanks a lot


Must add, the headliners drummer would have provided but he has no car at the moment so its awkward to get his kit down.

Well you have already offered, so the question is moot.

Yes other drummers can destroy your gear. Thin heads can be pitted and cymbals broken.

Anyway, forget that now and just play your first gig and have fun.

Good luck.
 

Bokatron

Member
thanks for the replys everyone

I think id be silly not to expect a couple of dinks but hopefully everyone will be careful. I plan on keeping this as a gigging kit anyway, theres no way id be bringing something of high value down for everyone to bash.

There are a couple heads that are due a change but ill be waiting till after the gig.

No chance anyone is using my cymbals or snare, to much money at stake. Cant chance that. I did look up a couple of the bands playing that night and its nothing heavy, if they have a double kick they can bring that to.

Ive asked one of the drummers to bring a cymbal stand as one of the 3 i have is a 25 year old premier thing haha, Vintage :D! Not got round to changing it yet. Im confident in the rest of the gear though

Very excited about this gig, got a good crowd going. The Venues a large pub with a stage, probably fits a good 150 people in there possibly more

Anyways im off to rehearsals for the afternoon, catch ya later guys :D
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I think these are kid bands. Now not so say kids are inconsiderate but they simply do not know yet how to NOT break things yet. I have a long painfull expensive history of breaking things which is how I learned to NOT break things. I think you get what I am saying?
Gotcha Jim. I was pretty gung ho back in the day too. Thankfully I was very skinny and not strong by drummer standards, but I still managed to do some damage.

Bokatron, there's a range of views about porting your kick drum reso head. Some say to have a 4" hole is easiest. Some are against the hole (because it affects the sound) and say you can always mic the batter head. I've always used ported kick drum reso heads (or none at all) but I'm no connoisseur.

Break a leg!
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
Reminds me of a Canada Day festival I played a few years ago in Cornwall Ontario, be funny if the drummer involved read this, cause he was a douche.

We arrive early in the day about noon, We are scheduled to open the day, then there is two other bands, a beatles tribute and then a journey tribute.

The sound guys are getting things going and there is a huge rock kit centre stage all set up. No one knows the deal, so I figure, house kit, awesome. So i remove a couple toms, move a few cymabl stands up or down and tune a bit. Then this raging drummer shows up after about an hour, (Journey guy) screaming that i messed with his kit. So I let him know, you arent on stage until 9 tonight, there are other bands, if you did not want anyone on your kit, either be here to let people know or get it the f off the stage until you get your rock star moment tonight. I was laughing heartily inside.

Then to top it off paul mcCartney who was a french dude from Quebec was the biggest prima Donna, almost got punched out by the sound tech. Awesome fun on the road.

What this has to do with this post, I dunno, just some old guy rambling.
 

ddrumman2004

Senior Member
If you think about it.....it boils down to "respect". Respect for one's self and other people, and that includes any gear that one let's anyone else use in a gig.

This includes all other instruments as well. I was involved with band about 11 years ago and we were playing at a place the lead singer had opened up. All was well until some "blues" musicians got on stage and started thrashing our stuff. The drummer tried his best, I think, to break the batter head on my snare!

Then the lead guitar players guitar had 3 broke strings!

I won't do that anymore!
 
The first time i supplied the kit at a gig, the opening act completely pitholed my skins (looked like a freckin pizza!!) Ended up having to stretch them out, the toms sounded shocking. Since then ive always used thicker ply.

Also normally the headline provides kit but everyone has to bring their own Breakables (hardware:stands,throne.. cymbals, snare, kick, sticks etc)
 

Bokatron

Member
Well gotta say, went very well. Had cheers from the crowd, even an encore :D. Dont think it could have gone better. Already have a gig lined up at place which is probably know as the best venue within the county (not country lol).

The kit got respected although i did stupidly allow the first bands drummer to retune them, god was that mistake, couldnt believe how tight the heads were. But i did say he could so my bad i guess!! The other two bands after us i knew and they were nice as pie :).

Thanks for the answers regarding the post all
 

K.Howden

Senior Member
In these situations I send an email to all the drummers who'll be using my kit with a tech-spec and a picture just so they know what extra stuff they may need to bring and so they can plan ahead around any problems my set-up may cause them.

From personal experience of using headliners kits, my biggest worry before getting to the venue was "am I going to be able to set up comfortably?". Because of this I also send a list of reassurances...things like; making it clear that I'm on hand to help them and that my primary concern is that they're set-up as comfortably as possible thefore they can move whatever they want to suit their needs. After all the last thing you need the day you're going to be performing is stress!

If you can develop a reputation of being an easy and amiable person to work with it will pay dividends.

Glad your gig went well :)

Kev
 

Bigdumbdrums

Senior Member
I played a gig once with 3 other bands and we all used my Gretsch Renown Maples. The other drummers used everything I had including my snare, hats, cymbals, etc. Maybe I took a chance but this was one of those gigs where the other bands were friends of my friend and they weren't hard hitters based on the style of music. I actually enjoyed listening to how they played my kit so I could finally hear how they really sound from the front of the stage (un-mic'd).
Nobody put even a slight scratch in the kit so I was happy in the end as was the other drummers for not having to haul their gear. It made everything easier production-wise.
 

Zickos

Gold Member
Also will i need to have a hole in the front of my kick drum for the mics?
I went to a concert of a friend of mine who plays in a metal band a few weeks ago. The venue was not large (50' x 150' maybe). 4 pc band, guitar, bass, drums and keyboard (?). I know it's metal and that's not my bag but the guitar and bass were so loud that you couldn't hear the keyboard. As far as my friend on the drums (unmic'd), you could hear the snare back beats but nothing else. I saw him doing all these neat things but they were for naught.
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
Experience, years of it, should give you the ability to read a drummer's maturity level. If i see a younger guy with a "looking to prove himself" attitude or something, then I know, hands off my kit. Then you see the seasoned guy, like myself, who knows he is up there for 40 minutes and moving things around will not change the future of the world, and then I say, use it all, cymbals, snare pedals, whatever you need.

I am rarely wrong. Last weekend I let an older guy use everything, he was respectful, he still "dug in" and did his best to impress me, but he did not screw with the tuning, or move things around.

Glad you had a good gig.
 
From the replies above and from personal experience, it's pretty clear that in this situation the key thing is communication. If you politely speak to whoever it is beforehand and just lay down some rules/preferences regarding your kit without being too bossy, things normally work out. I've been gigging solid for over a year now, and never had a drummer be disrespectful as I've always spoke to them beforehand and done whatever I could to help them out.
 

random

Member
I don't mind people playing on my drums but the list of folks who I'll let near my cymbals is very, very short. I've put together a spare "gigging" kit out of free or very cheap drums I've gathered over the years. However, I have realized no one wants to play my setup anyway. Seems like there ain't many folks around here that like to play a three piece. Oh well, I actually have ended up liking my cheap set more anyway.
 

Frank

Gold Member
For me, it would depend on what type of bands.

If it was a bunch of older cover bands, with drummers who know about non-sledge-hammer playing - I'd have no problem.

If it was a bunch of pro jazz bands - I'd absolutely have no problem.

If it involved some younger bands who pound away - I'd have a big problem.

I can't afford lots of equipment, and the equipment I do have - Has to stay in shape.
 
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