Prog to isolate drum tracks from a mix?

prfssrgrnhrn

Junior Member
Looking for some simple software where I can add songs (MP3's) to isolate drum tracks only for the purpose of learning. Would like to have every instrument in a given song brought in or taken out at will. I have seen a lot of programs out there but having trouble finding anything where I can just download a song and strip the instruments out and bring them back in with the intention of just learning the drum part of a particular song. If anyone out there can lead me to a simple program for this use were headin' to Red Lobster with dinner on me. Thanks and hope to get some input on this!
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
Short answer: It's not possible

Longer answer: There are software solutions that allow you to strip out certain frequencies, which will allow you to remove frequency areas where certain instruments typically reside. You won't be able to remove or extract just one instrument cleanly, but you might be able to hear it more clearly.
 
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PQleyR

Platinum Member
Not only is this not possible, I'm not sure it will ever be possible. It's in the same league as trying to rotate a photograph to view the objects in it from a different perspective, or photoshopping someone's jacket off so you can see their shirt. There is no way for a computer to know which bit of the sound is drums.

To do what you're asking for, you'd need to have access to the original multitrack parts or stems/submixes from the original recording session. Otherwise it would be like pouring red paint into a bucket of yellow paint, mixing it up, and then trying to get the red paint out again.

In terms of aiding learning, as Naigewron says, you could use EQ to take some of the frequencies out to help hear certain parts, but that will only get you so far. You can also slow things down while preserving the pitch. If something isn't audible though, it probably isn't worth worrying about that much! Working parts out from a record by ear is quite an art and it can take a while to get really good at it.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
A lot of the isolated tracks on YouTube are from covers used in some of the video games, and the parts aren't usually 100% accurate. If accuracy isn't the goal, they should be fine. In my line of work, I would never rely on a cover version part, or a transcription either. I listen to the songs myself, and figure out the parts. In most modern music, the drums are mixed pretty hot, and hearing everything is pretty easy.

However, there a re a number of classic and modern songs whose actual stems are available on line and as solo instruments on YouTube, just make sure your ears are well trained before assuming a track is genuine, or a cover.

Bermuda
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
Look at the custom backing tracks at karaoke-version.com.

Costs $3 per song, which you can then download as many different versions of as you want.

The tracks aren't 100% as per the originals, but they are very close.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Otherwise it would be like pouring red paint into a bucket of yellow paint, mixing it up, and then trying to get the red paint out again..
^ This!

However, there is a service called http://www.jammit.com/ that sells the individual stems for selected songs that the original artists have authorized.

I have never used it or played with it, but I have seen various bands advertising their stems for sale via this site.
 

prfssrgrnhrn

Junior Member
Thank you to all for the great info on this. I can usually hear 98% of the drum part in any song but I guess I try to shoot for the 100% perfection and that's not always easy. Very thankful for the feedback and everyone taking the time out to help a fellow drummer. You guys are awesome once again!
 

mickster

Junior Member
^ This!

However, there is a service called http://www.jammit.com/ that sells the individual stems for selected songs that the original artists have authorized.

I have never used it or played with it, but I have seen various bands advertising their stems for sale via this site.
I found out about Jammit a few days ago. The song selection is not that great and at $ 3.99 a pop it seem a little pricey. But...having said all that I was, (don't laugh), having a hard time getting China Grove down. One you have purchased and DL'd the song you can slow it down and\or isolate the drum track. I was then able to get a "grip" on the feel, and off I went. You can also add in and control a click or you can take the drums out all together for further practice after getting the groove down.

It a little buggy on my iPad, but still worth the $ 3.99 I guess if you are having a hard time getting it down.

Also...you can look at the written chart as the song plays...

Hope this helps!
 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
A lot of the isolated tracks on YouTube are from covers used in some of the video games,
This, except the ones I've seen are the original music.

The way I see it....

The Guitar Hero and Rock Band games used licensed original music ,so they have access to the master recordings. They have to put the drums on a separate track because they have to drop in/out as you play the game (I assume) If you take the CD's from the games and used a recording program, you can isolate different tracks (but not everything)

People have spent the time to do this and post them on the internet so, with some research, you can find maybe a thousand different drumless tracks.

Google isolated tracks for a start or check resource for drums .com

Personally, I think it's a great tool if you don't have a band to play with.
 
The Guitar Hero and Rock Band games used licensed original music ,so they have access to the master recordings. They have to put the drums on a separate track because they have to drop in/out as you play the game (I assume)
Close, Guitar Hero was entirely covers, Guitar Hero II was largely covers with some original masters used, Guitar Hero III and Rock Band 1 were largely originals with some covers, and Rock Band 2/3 were entirely master recordings. As the popularity of the games increased, the developers were able to secure more master recordings, which was great. I think the large, large majority of DLC released for these games were the originals too (and there is a LOT of Rock Band DLC).

All that said, the cover versions available in the games were of fantastic quality. In fact, in one case the original band attempted to sue the developers because the cover was virtually indistinguishable from their original ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guitar_Hero_Encore:_Rocks_the_80s#Lawsuit ).
 
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