Problems with drum teacher

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I know a lot of folks here may disagree, and that's OK, but I think anyone taking drum lessons should begin with playing a snare only for a long while to learn hand technique, way before ever sitting down behind a kit. Trying to learn hands and feet, and read all at once, IMHO is a recipe for disaster. I know we all learn at different levels, but once the rudiments are learned and some reading is learned, then just add that to the rest of the set. Trying to learn rudiments and hihat technique, foot patterns etc all at once is not my idea of ideal lessons. The rudiments will help you move around the kit with different stockings. Whatever you do, good luck.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I know a lot of folks here may disagree, and that's OK, but I think anyone taking drum lessons should begin with playing a snare only for a long while to learn hand technique, way before ever sitting down behind a kit. Trying to learn hands and feet, and read all at once, IMHO is a recipe for disaster. I know we all learn at different levels, but once the rudiments are learned and some reading is learned, then just add that to the rest of the set. Trying to learn rudiments and hihat technique, foot patterns etc all at once is not my idea of ideal lessons. The rudiments will help you move around the kit with different stockings. Whatever you do, good luck.
If you like loosing all your young students after 2 weeks than it's a great idea.

There are ways to do this by simplifying the concept.

I get over the stuck with one beat syndrome by getting stylistically diverse right away.
 

oldskoolsoul

Silver Member
..I think anyone taking drum lessons should begin with playing a snare only for a long while to learn hand technique, way before ever sitting down behind a kit..

When we would live in an ideal world i would completely agree with this..

But i think nowadays the situation is much more like Odd-Arne Oseberg said here..:


..If you like loosing all your young students after 2 weeks than it's a great idea..

Which is true..There will be very little students that are able to keep motivated with only playing a snaredrum for a few months, while basically they just want to bash out Highway To Hell within 1 lesson..

Especially in the beginning very little students care about learning rudiments i think..And i also think is no problem if they catch up a few months later with that..
 

Frank

Gold Member
Thank God my drum teacher didn't do that to me. I was on a full kit from day one. That didn't mean he skipped the rudiments. We logged tons of time on the Syncopation book, rudiments, and other fundamentals. But, from day one, I sat at the full kit, in all it's glory, and it was great. Couldn't imagine doing the snare only thing to a new student. Ugh.
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
Two different approaches for sure. Merit in either approach. As a younger boogie I would have needed a kit, as an old f$rt Id probably dig just some snare work. Different strokes for different fend yolks, where is that guy anyway?
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I would have already left. When I teach beginners my goal is to make drumming fun, while still sneaking in the rudiments and theory... I like to teach my students a few beats, grooves and fills early that are obtainable to suck them in to the joys of drumming, but I'll give them some rudiments to learn once I can see their coordination and independence levels.

Giving someone a bunch of rudimental work and trying to have them play above their ability doesn't sound fun, or beneficial.

As long as you explain where you're at and didn't come in saying you were above your level it would be an easy decision for me.

I understand how you want things explained too. I tonwant to see it, and have someone tell me and SHOW me what to do, not just have me figure it all out. I think learning ghost notes and accents is enough of a challenge for new students without feeling stressed.

Try a few teachers. You will know when you find the right one pretty quick. I honestly don't play much and have the student play most of my lesson, it's not an opportunity for me to show off my rudiments. I'll give an example, or assist if they need tempo or to show they are off time. but it is THEIR lesson.

Also, you paid for it, you should be the one happy you did it after.
 

Pasteur

Junior Member
I am a beginning drummer but a lifelong musician. You need to change your teacher. Find a teacher who understands the cardinal rule of learning to play any instrument: Go slow in the beginning and build up speed gradually. Also, a good teacher will never shoot you down but will offer encouragement. You should feel motivated and inspired by your teachers, not discouraged.
 

Bamadrummer88

Junior Member
Well, I've been looking for teachers, and same as always, no luck lol. Perks of living in a town full of guitarists. Any recommendations for online resources or Skype lessons? Mainly need to work on my hand technique like I said.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Well, I've been looking for teachers, and same as always, no luck lol. Perks of living in a town full of guitarists. Any recommendations for online resources or Skype lessons? Mainly need to work on my hand technique like I said.
Somebody earlier suggested Dom Famularo. He’s definitely a good choice.
 

cornelius

Silver Member
Well, I've been looking for teachers, and same as always, no luck lol. Perks of living in a town full of guitarists. Any recommendations for online resources or Skype lessons? Mainly need to work on my hand technique like I said.
I would recommend Dom - as I mentioned above, I study with him in person and via Skype. Technique type things work well over Skype as you’ll be in front of your computer with a pad - he’ll see how you’re playing and help you. I’m in NYC with teachers everywhere and I still make the trek to see Dom...
 

Bamadrummer88

Junior Member
Well good news, I found a local drum teacher ( hopefully it works out, otherwise I may have to try online Skype lessons). He's pretty vague about hand technique, as in grip, free stroke, Moeller, etc. He doesn't look at how I'm gripping the stick, moreso just keeps check on my stick heights. He just said everybody grips the stick differently, which drives me crazy lol, because I don't want to be holding the stick incorrectly and find out I'm doing it wrong a year down the road. But I figure I need to give it a shot and make sure it's not me being a bad student instead of having bad teachers.
 

Gottliver

Senior Member
Well good news, I found a local drum teacher ( hopefully it works out, otherwise I may have to try online Skype lessons). He's pretty vague about hand technique, as in grip, free stroke, Moeller, etc. He doesn't look at how I'm gripping the stick, moreso just keeps check on my stick heights. He just said everybody grips the stick differently, which drives me crazy lol, because I don't want to be holding the stick incorrectly and find out I'm doing it wrong a year down the road. But I figure I need to give it a shot and make sure it's not me being a bad student instead of having bad teachers.
There are hundreds if not thousands of great drum lessons on youtube. Explore them. They are free. You will quickly understand what makes a good teacher good.
 

oldskoolsoul

Silver Member
..Well good news, I found a local drum teacher..He doesn't look at how I'm gripping the stick, moreso just keeps check on my stick heights. He just said everybody grips the stick differently, which drives me crazy lol, because I don't want to be holding the stick incorrectly and find out I'm doing it wrong a year down the road..

Your teacher is correct in my opinion when he says that everyone grips a stick slightly different, since we are not all build the same..But then still there are some basic essential things that can be applied to everyone in order to have a physically relaxed way of playing..

If having proper hand-technique/grip for you is a very important thing, then i think that you are maybe losing precious time and money with this one..

Or maybe just stress him more about that..
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
Bad teacher. Find someone else.

Also what does 'legato' mean with regard to drums? Am I missing something? Legato to me means notes overlapping one another slightly, which is clearly not possible with a drum...drums are inherently staccato.
 

Bamadrummer88

Junior Member
Your teacher is correct in my opinion when he says that everyone grips a stick slightly different, since we are not all build the same..But then still there are some basic essential things that can be applied to everyone in order to have a physically relaxed way of playing..

If having proper hand-technique/grip for you is a very important thing, then i think that you are maybe losing precious time and money with this one..

Or maybe just stress him more about that..
Yeah, I'm beginning to wonder if I've just been worried to much about all this technique and grip stuff. Besides playing music of course current goals are to learn the rudiments correctly and secondly be able to play fast punk, metal, maybe eventually jazz patterns without feeling like my arms are going to lock up and start spazzing out.
 
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