Practice (Home) acoustics

Case

Junior Member
What do you, or what can you do to a basement area to calm the noise, some say "it's annoying" I say "What was that?" Acoustic dampening recommends I guess is what I am after.

How effective are they in a house?
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
acoustic treatment only controls internal reflections in the room it will not stop sound from getting out. So the real question is what are you trying to achieve? Sound from getting out and bugging people or tailoring the sound inside the room for yourself?

If it's sound from getting out then you will need to do a lot more than "acoustic treatment". You'll need to break out the hammer and saw and do some building. Probably the best bet is to hit the search button here and search for sound proofing, you'll find day's worth of reading available.
 

Macarina

Silver Member
Go electric for practicing at minimal sound levels.

Dampening an acoustic kit, IMO, ya might as well sit on your bed and smack some pillows.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
I've heard people practice drumming outdoors in the park.

Before I got the ekit I used foam mufflers or t-shirts to quiet the drums and cymbals..

I think it takes about two years of practice to get good on drums. When I sounded better the neighbors became a little more tolerant of my drum practice sessions.
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
It depends on who's complaining and where the sound is getting out.

If it's the neighbors, you might be able to get away with jamming pillows in the windows.
If it's the people in the house, as in right above the drums, then there isn't much that can be done other than working around their schedule.

Sometimes it's just one neighbor that can be a real nervous pant load when it comes to hearing anything that doesn't fit into their idea of tranquility.

I live in a neighborhood that is very dense. I just moved back into the house I grew up in. This street is like an amphitheater. I can understand a person out in the street from the earpiece of their phone. Not a speakerphone, the earpiece.
Skateboarders ride down the street and it sounds like jets.

But — people don't complain about musicians. A neighbor on one side plays sax with the windows open. There is a music studio at the top of the street. They sometimes have loud jams. I used to play in an uninsulated walk in closet. I'm sure I blasted the neighborhood. But also, leaf blowers are illegal to use in my town and the neighbors will call the cops the second they hear one.

It's all relative to what people don't get upset about. My street appreciates musicians, but I bet if I ran double pedals at speed with annoying persistence, they might get perturbed.

Real soundproofing is very expensive, but a rug on the floor and stuffing in the windows can help a lot.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Real solutions are expensive and involved, but a construction that doesn't vibrate on the floor + anything from carptes to matresses will help. You can even drape something around the kit.
 

mikel

Platinum Member
Another layer of plasterboard with Green Glue between, on the walls and ceiling, would help, and try to seal the door with appropriate materials. Plus, get the kit off the floor on a simple anti vibration riser. Check this forum for details.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
If you just want to reduce the sound within the room, some carpet and curtains will make a big difference. An old sofa will absorb some sound, and you can often find room divider panels from offices being sold off cheaply. You can take the legs off and stick them on a wall, or keep them free standing around the kit.

In my front room I've set the kit up in various directions, and I've found one corner gives a strong bass sound from the kick and toms, without me hitting too hard. A good spot for practising, because it sounds good to me, so I play longer.
Also, wear earplugs or muffs when you play in a small room. It helps you concentrate better when your ears aren't recoiling from each hit.

These tips won't help the neighbours much, but they'll protect your hearing and help you practice more comfortably.
 

Case

Junior Member
These tips won't help the neighbours much, but they'll protect your hearing and help you practice more comfortably.
So, I could probably swap out some neighbors every now and then and still be able to hear them cursing me as they leave.

Excellent advice!
 

ottoman

Junior Member
I second the carpet and curtains. Even thin curtains hung a few inches off the wall can help dramatically. It gives the sound something to break against and then space to diffuse before hitting the wall. Reflections have to go through that same process to get past the curtain.
 

mikel

Platinum Member
Carpets, curtains and furniture will help the sound in the room, but will do nothing to stop it escaping and upseting the neighbours.
 
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