Plexiglass - but a little different.

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I've used several plexiglass shields, and I hate the feeling that I'm playing in an aquarium.

However, I ran across a picture of different kinds of plexiglass baffles. Anyone ever use anything like this? It seems to me that it would be more of a placebo effect but I could be wrong. Anyone ever use anything like this just around certain areas of the kit? In particular maybe cymbals?





or maybe something like this:




This one seems like a little much, but I'll throw it in there too:

 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Haha they look like the teleprompters politicians use when giving a speech. Never seen anything like it for drums before.
 

cjl71178

Silver Member
Ive never seen these before. I remember playing a few venues that had the full sheets around the drumkit which i hated! I bet these have to do with miking the cymbals looking at how theyre placed.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Ive never seen these before. I remember playing a few venues that had the full sheets around the drumkit which i hated! I bet these have to do with miking the cymbals looking at how theyre placed.
From reviews of what I've read, they have more to do with a) giving the other musicians some relief from some of the top-end "bite" that cymbals can have and b) cymbal sound bleeding into other mics on stage.
 

cjl71178

Silver Member
From reviews of what I've read, they have more to do with a) giving the other musicians some relief from some of the top-end "bite" that cymbals can have and b) cymbal sound bleeding into other mics on stage.
I should show these to my guitar player, lol!
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
From reviews of what I've read, they have more to do with a) giving the other musicians some relief from some of the top-end "bite" that cymbals can have and b) cymbal sound bleeding into other mics on stage.
Exactly. Cymbals are the bigger sonic issue compared to drum volume. I think that the partial shields look a bit goofier than panels, and ultimately don't block as well. I guess the drummer has the final say in what kind of shielding they prefer, although I find no problem with full panels.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I’ve seen ‘em before, but have never played behind them. If the band is using IEMs, then why use them?

On the other hand, I have played in many of those full booths and the heat is real drag. Fan required. Rogers kit optional.

 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
If the band is using IEMs, then why use them?
The shields are also about controlling the overall volume of the kit, which can compete with the house sound in many cases. It's not just about the other players.

Bermuda
 
In smaller venues, cymbal projection to the audience is a big issue. No one ever complains that the floor tom is too loud, it's all about the cymbals and in some case the snare. A full plexi front creates other issues, this just spreads out the sound from the audience's perspective. It's quite clever really.

And yes, guitar amps are also a problem due to being very directional. Plexi panels in front of amps also causes issues with early reflections there, but more and more pro's are moving to modellers nowadays so there's that.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Yea I pretty much detest any shield. It seems to me that a shield would be unnecessary if the drummer played the cymbals and drums at an appropriate volume first and foremost, and if micing...mic placement and possibly gates for the mics that they don't want cymbal/drum bleed in secondly. I always thought that shields were like training wheels for drummers who can't play at least part or all of their kit at an appropriate volume. Why don't lead guitar cabs have shields? Arguably, their frequencies are right in the vocal range too, and more piercing, why aren't we shielding them? Is it because they would complain? Or is it because the singers mic right is right near the cymbals? Well relocate the singers mic for Paradiddle Pete's sake!

No, let's just dump this issue on the drummer, it's their fault, as usual. Because there's no way on earth that this could fall under the umbrella of clever sound reinforcement tactics.

I don't think shields are necessary with good drummers and good sound people. Plus they look SOOO bad. I just threw up in my mouth a little picturing one.

If the drums are miced behind a shield, that to me is doubly wacky. I mean I understand that the drummer may have to hit hard live, and still be miced for FOH, but if drum bleed into mic X is too bad, move mic X. I have a hard time believing that anywhere mic X is moved onstage...will be unacceptable for drum bleed, but OK for lead guitar bleed. It seems drums are singled out as the only thing needing shielding. If the stage is that small, and the venue is small, ideally, the drummer needs to control their volume with their touch, not some heavy giant sheet of plexiglas, right? That's how I see it anyway.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I have seen lately two single vertical panels. Floor standing, one on each side of the kit in front of crashes and the ride.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
How about we just put the singer in the fish tank. Then the mic won't get any bleed at all! Yeah, put the obnoxious guy in the box and see how he likes it.
 
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