Please Don't Do This

Liebe zeit

Silver Member
So I subscribe to the "There are no wrong notes" philosophy, as long as they're being played by a master who knows what s/he's doing. And this applies to cymbal sustain also, I reckon.
I agree with this. It really depends on the music. Stopping on a sixpence can be just right for a tight soul tune, and loads of sustain can be just the right thing in a noisy alt-rock situation, but put a sharp stop on the cymbals in the wrong place and it sounds like cheesy hair rock tune
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
Max does that a few times in For Big Sid and I just can't hate on it
Heh. Yeah, I was just being silly.

Reading through this thread, I think back to Miles' autobiography, where he described an argument with Bird, who said you could play a D in the fifth bar of a Bb blues (I think that was the scenario, anyway). Miles disagreed, but then at some point Lester Young did it (although Miles said he kind of bent the note, IIRC) and Bird gave Miles an "I told you so" look.

So I subscribe to the "There are no wrong notes" philosophy, as long as they're being played by a master who knows what s/he's doing. And this applies to cymbal sustain also, I reckon.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
Yeah, but I'm too lazy. lol
Oh, I don't know about that. You now know that if you say things like tutti cesura or ad finem cum acuta gravis uolnerati teveryone will think you're nuts :)

Oh dear, that is something I do from time to time, but it's a deliberate thing. Typically one, or even two unsupported crashes before the main accent on the "1". I'll break away early from the toms in a linear fill, and infill on crashes, or precede the "1" with a couple of splash hits, all in quick succession of course. I also use an unsupported crash as a prelude to a bigger accent, or something to add syncopation to an otherwise straight passage. http://youtu.be/apJLRFCKnGo?hd=1
Abso-bloody-lutely ... and cool little solo, Andy.

I have no qualms about crashing without backup. Here's my example - very short MP3 attached - non-chaperoned crash at about 16 secs.

Tragic really. Even this young lad knows better than to crash without the kick :) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKOApC9KB48

If you think that's funny, try this one ... in tears ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ssdqD0OWtwo
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Now when someone plays a cymbal crash without accompanying it with a unison note from the bass drum or snare, that's something I find really objectionable and wrong. :)
Oh dear, that is something I do from time to time, but it's a deliberate thing. Typically one, or even two unsupported crashes before the main accent on the "1". I'll break away early from the toms in a linear fill, and infill on crashes, or precede the "1" with a couple of splash hits, all in quick succession of course. I also use an unsupported crash as a prelude to a bigger accent, or something to add syncopation to an otherwise straight passage. Am I in trouble?

Actually, I just thought of an example :) Ok, not the greatest of playing, but I quickly hammed this out for our very own 2 minute solo challenge (I'm not a soloist).

"Offending" move at 1:05 :) http://youtu.be/apJLRFCKnGo?hd=1
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
I believe the correct orchestral term is "ending with a bang" or ad finem cum cohortem or ad finem cum acuta gravis uolnerati.

Don't quote me on this or you'll look really, really silly or, as the Latins say, non commemorare me in hoc aut petetis vere, inepte.

this is a family forum Grea
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
I believe the correct orchestral term is "ending with a bang" or ad finem cum cohortem or ad finem cum acuta gravis uolnerati.

Don't quote me on this or you'll look really, really silly or, as the Latins say, non commemorare me in hoc aut petetis vere, inepte.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
Tutti and cesaru are actual musical terms and yes, they are Italian. Most of them are, I think, sforzando and glissando and allegro and so on.

Tutti means everyone and cesura means complete stop. What I did was put the two together to mean "everyone stop."

I doubt that it's a strictly legitimate orchestral term. Let's say that I coined it. Please don't do this.
Sounds good. I learn something new everyday. It's been so long since I've played from sheet music. Ironically, about as long as I've been playing drums.
 

con struct

Platinum Member
Never heard that phrase before. Is it Italian?
Tutti and cesaru are actual musical terms and yes, they are Italian. Most of them are, I think, sforzando and glissando and allegro and so on.

Tutti means everyone and cesura means complete stop. What I did was put the two together to mean "everyone stop."

I doubt that it's a strictly legitimate orchestral term. Let's say that I coined it. Please don't do this.
 
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MikeM

Platinum Member
I've heard players slap crashes without snare or kick (Weckl comes to mind). I can like it like that because it has a similar vibe as shanking on a ride cymbal or hitting a splash as a stand-alone accent.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
I can appreciate musical pet peeves because I have a lot of them myself. I can't say this is one of them, though.

Now when someone plays a cymbal crash without accompanying it with a unison note from the bass drum or snare, that's something I find really objectionable and wrong. :)
Pshaw! (always wanted to use that) ... it depends on the musical moment, the type of crash and whether the bassist is providing enough punch underneath to take the bass drum's role.

What I find objectionable is drummers who play too loudly. I feel jumping up on stage like throttling them and saying STFU :)
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Now when someone plays a cymbal crash without accompanying it with a unison note from the bass drum or snare, that's something I find really objectionable and wrong. :)
Max does that a few times in For Big Sid and I just can't hate on it

though it does bother me in most situations but some cats pull it off

:)
 
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Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
...............................
Ha! What a thread...

Interesting to think about, really. The point of the thread is to admonish drummers to never let a cymbal ring when the band plays a tutti cesura ending. In other words, play the ending "as written," or as previously agreed upon. Does anyone really need to be reminded of this?

(I'm only guessing at the "tutti cesura." I've been wracking my brain to come up with the right term, to no success. Still, tutti cesura actually works, and it's also rather cute.)
Never heard that phrase before. Is it Italian? Anywho, I'm terrible with endings. I need to practice them quite a few times to get them down. Although, many endings are just ad-lib and sometimes it works out well.

I can appreciate musical pet peeves because I have a lot of them myself. I can't say this is one of them, though.

Now when someone plays a cymbal crash without accompanying it with a unison note from the bass drum or snare, that's something I find really objectionable and wrong. :)
Ya, the thought never even crossed my mind that this is something to be concerned about. I don't have any drummer based pet peeves. Mine mostly have to do with players of other instruments. Like all the constant guitar noodling going on in between songs. As soon as they plug in and the power is connected, up goes the volume and the noodling commences.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
I can appreciate musical pet peeves because I have a lot of them myself. I can't say this is one of them, though.

Now when someone plays a cymbal crash without accompanying it with a unison note from the bass drum or snare, that's something I find really objectionable and wrong. :)
 
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