Players that sound like they are always on the edge of making a mistake

behindthenotes

Junior Member
Hi Guys

This is our weekly disscussion topic this week but would be keen to hear your thoughts on this - go easy on each other on the responses...no scrapping

Players that sound like they are always on the edge of making a mistake.

The great Tony Williams used to say that one of the qualities he liked most in players is where they sounded like they were "always on the edge of making a mistake". In essence I guess he was referring to those players that push the envelope, venture into the unknown, REAL expression.

We would like to know from you guys which players you think display this quality in their playing.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Keith Moon

When you're running or jogging and you trip, and you try to run really fast in your desperate attempt to stay up...yeah, THAT'S what his drumming was like.
 

Sutor

Member
Bonham in the real early days before calmed down a bit, He was loose but still on the ball, I think JPJ had a lot to do with it but still, absoloutely amazing.
 

tomgrosset

Pioneer Member
Wayne Shorter definitely displays this distinguishing quality in his playing. In my opinion, Wayne Shorter is in the same lineage of the great composers of the 20th and 21st century.

"A lot of musicians worry about protecting what I call their musical foundation. They want to be on their Ps and Qs on stage, put their best foot forward, play their best runs, their best and try to impress people. But I'm at a point where I'm just going say, 'To hell with the rules.' That's all I'm doing with the music now. I'm 71, I've got nothing to lose now. I'm going for the unknown." - Wayne
 

That Guy

Platinum Member
Bernard Purdie

I have always thought that he played a little too much than what is necessarily required. Filled the bar in with a host of ghost notes ect. I guess thats what makes him great.
 

beatsMcGee

Pioneer Member
Bernard Purdie

I have always thought that he played a little too much than what is necessarily required. Filled the bar in with a host of ghost notes ect. I guess thats what makes him great.

i love bernard purdie.. he reminds me of winnie the pooh.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
ME! The problem is that I all to often go over and fall into the abyss. It can be a long climb out of the hole sometimes.
 

Drifter in the Dark

Silver Member
Some of my favorite examples of this sort of playing: Ndugu Chancler on Weather Report's Tale Spinnin', and Lenny White on Return to Forever's No Mystery Both of those drummers are extremely loose and extremely funky! Sometimes they stretch the time way out, but (much like Elvin and Tony) they're always conscious of where the time is, and I admire that.
 

Vipercussionist

Silver Member
Keith Moon

When you're running or jogging and you trip, and you try to run really fast in your desperate attempt to stay up...yeah, THAT'S what his drumming was like.
Ha HA HA !!! That's a PERFECT visual for Moon!! It really describes him in a non drumming way that a non musician would understand.
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__________________
Most respect the badge, but all fear the drum.
 

king fail

Senior Member
Dafnis Prieto; he looks like everything he does is one big mistake, his facial expressions and wildly flailing limbs (slight exaggeration...) give me the impression that he has no idea what he's doing, but MAN!!!!!
HE'S INCREDIBLE!
 

Mathew 7:21

Senior Member
One of my favorites, Mr. Alex Van Halen. Just listen to Van Halen II , one of the best rock drummer recordings of all time!
 

Scott Mulder

Junior Member
I always felt that Lenny White was such a strong player that he could play very losely and still be absolutely precise. or, he could be one or the other.
Precise: Romantic Warrior
Loose: Vulcan Worlds
I hate to hear people describe him as a Tony Williams imitator. He was his own phenomina. I heard Stanley Clarke say to a crowd in Philadelphia that Lenny was his FAVORITE drummer to play with. He is able to lead with the left or the right hand avoiding the need to "cross over" to play the high hat.

I love "Where have I known you before" , the loose fills across the toms with flams and dynamics thrown in. Down the toms then back up. Not boring like most rock drummers (in comparison)

Yes... and sounding like he might not catch up but be ahead of the beat instantly when needed. ...onthe verge of making a mistake but never making one!
That great Gretsch sound...
That fantastic funky hi hat and the rim shots on two and four. I could go on and on...
 
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