Plantar Fasciitis

Adcc

Junior Member
Hi guys,

I've been suffering from plantar fasciitis on my left foot for nearly 10 months. I'm not using my left foot (hi-hat foot) for drumming as it hurts and makes my condition worse, and that's affecting my playing a lot. The doctor prescriped me insoles and rest. I can't take anti-iflammatory drugs because they react with some other drugs I'm taking for an other condition. The pain is reduced alot since I first started using the insoles but I can't say I'm completely healed and ready to use my foot on drumming. So when I play or practice I rest my left foot on the floor, tighten up the Hi-hat and do my best. Did anyone else had the same problem before and completely recovered? If yes, what would you recomment for faster recovery? How long did you wait for that? I've started doing some foot exercises recently as well, are they any good?

It sucks to not be able to use your left foot, especially if you like playing jazz like me. Thanks guys!
 
M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
I suffered from that for a short time a few years ago. It got to the point where I was wearing one of those velcro "boots" on my foot and calf while I was at work. My doctor at the time worked with me on stretches I was to do everyday, as much as I could. I also saw a video on YouTube where it was recommended to keep tennis balls near your feet under your desk so I could roll my foot on them and keep them moving.

Doing some routine bloodwork my doctor discovered that I was actually low in potassium, and since then I've been taking two potassium tablets a day and I've never had any more issues. He explained that the amount of potassium I'm taking is equivalent to eating about five bananas a day, so he didn't recommend eating that many bananas!

Of course, you'd have to speak with your doctor about what you may need to be taking and doing, but the stretching, and light exercising got me started. The potassium I needed was discovered after.
 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
It's a common injury with a VERY simple fix.

I hobbled around for more than a year waiting for it to go away.

When I finally went to the doctor I was stunned when I learned the cause and treatment.

You simply need orthotic arch supports in your shoes. It's a piece of sturdy hard plastic, molded to fit your foot and it slips in your shoes.

They sell generic models but I had mine made and I've been using the same pair for 20+ years.

When I saw them I thought, "WTF are these gonna do?" but in a few weeks, I was cured.
 

v.zarate

Gold Member
It's a common injury with a VERY simple fix.

I hobbled around for more than a year waiting for it to go away.

When I finally went to the doctor I was stunned when I learned the cause and treatment.

You simply need orthotic arch supports in your shoes. It's a piece of sturdy hard plastic, molded to fit your foot and it slips in your shoes.

They sell generic models but I had mine made and I've been using the same pair for 20+ years.

When I saw them I thought, "WTF are these gonna do?" but in a few weeks, I was cured.
damn! im saved!!!! thanks for the recomendation!

i also suffer from this on my right foot. sucks some days
 

T.Underhill

Pioneer Member
I've had it come back a few times. Most PT places have stopped using the hard plastic insoles which over time would break, and now use a dense and durable cushion that's customized after they scan you're foot. The arches they made were much higher than the ones you can buy and man did they help, just like New Tricks said.

The icing, heating, rolling, boot, and stretching did help but it never went away completely until I received a shot straight into the heel. Insoles in every shoe I wear and stretching after any work keeps it at bay or completely gone for years.

It's a common problem but a huge PITA, hope it gets better for you.
 

makinao

Silver Member
This is how I licked it:

1) RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation) when it hurts most.

1) Lost weight - A couple of my leg/foot injuries usually happen or are aggravated when I go overweight. So I went on a "moderation" diet.

2) Insoles - I actually made my own by adding self-cut arch inserts under existing insoles.

3) Thick/Double socks - this is to provide additional cushioning and reduce foot movement and flexing while wearing shoes.

4) Gentle stretching - Not to be done when waking up or when my foot is cold. After walking or running, and before sleeping.

5) Keep feet warm while sleeping by wearing socks, and applying some kind of linament. Very important during cold seasons.
 

cornelius

Silver Member
I had it for a short while - a massage therapist gave me a lacrosse ball to roll under my foot. I kept it next to my bed - before sleep at night, and first thing in the morning before getting up.
 
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