Piccolo snares for rock. Bad idea?

Austen

Junior Member
Go for it.
If you're on the lookout for an inexpensive, smaller Mapex snare, I got one of these a couple weeks ago:
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Mapex-Steel-Piccolo-Snare-Drum-106541782-i1822611.gc

Pretty impressed with it considering the price. Little niceties like plastic washers between the lug bolts and the rim, super shine with a nice looking chrome badge, nice sounds anywhere from trashy loose, to crackin' tight, with just a bit of ring to it that can be easily tamed.
Seems a lot of people don't like that size, and you'll pay a bit more for snare specific heads in that size, but for a low budget, decent sounding snare, it's about the best deal going right now.
That link didn't work for me. Is this the same thing?
http://www.long-mcquade.com/products/16802/Drums/Snares/Mapex/13x3_5_Steel_Snare.htm

^cause that's what I'm getting
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
I'm surprised that link doesn't work for you. Maybe it's US only?

Anyways, from what I understand, the one you're looking at is very similar to, but a step up from the one I got, and a step below the Black Panther line. It's an MPX.
From the reviews I've read, the only real difference is the shell thickness. If you could see the 2 pictures together, you can't really tell the difference, except for the badge. One says MPX and the other just says Mapex.

The Black Panther snares and MPX line are listed on the Mapex site, but not the one from Guitar Center. Maybe they have some kind of a deal together?
The one I got cost $59.99 (USD).
 

Austen

Junior Member
I think the most likely guess is that L&M got something wrong. They're notorious for having an awful website haha
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
keep it simple, thanks for that clip. That sounds awesome! It's got way more balls than my current 5x14 snare. I have definitely decided I'm going for it.
Thanks!
Thanks! It's a great sounding little snare, but please don't regard it as sounding typical for it's type. It's a pretty special instrument in the hands of a pretty special player (pictured below).

That "little" drum sounds huge! I would have said it was a 14x5 from the sound it produces.

thatn said, the only thing i would be concerned about is if you play unmic'd- the projection isn't likely to be as good as with a bigger drum. If your usually mic'd up, there should be no problem.
There really is no concern about projection with a piccolo in an acoustic application live. If anything, quite the reverse, they cut like crazy! Ok, you won't get near field depth projecting, but the crack will cut your guitarist's head off :)
 

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wildbill

Platinum Member
Thanks! It's a great sounding little snare, but please don't regard it as sounding typical for it's type. It's a pretty special instrument in the hands of a pretty special player (pictured below).

There really is no concern about projection with a piccolo in an acoustic application live. If anything, quite the reverse, they cut like crazy! Ok, you won't get near field depth projecting, but the crack will cut your guitarist's head off :)


Well, you're talking a whole different universe of drum there, in the same general size category.
Gorgeous snare drum you posted there, and most likely worth every cent. Always good to see examples from more of the spectrum of what's available.
But someone like the OP, who paid $140 for a whole kit is probably unlikely to spring for something like that.
Maybe in the future.
 

Bretton

Silver Member
I've used a 14x4 Yamaha brass piccolo snare for a very long time, and it works great for my metal bands. I know Mike Van Dyne formerly of Arsis used/uses a drum of the same dimensions as well as Dirk Verbeuren of Soilwork. I love the cut, which I think for metal snares is way more important than body/depth. body and depth should come from the toms and kicks.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
Get the drum. If you dig it's sound, it'll make you happy. If you're happy, you'll practice more. Figure $99, divided by 12 months, you're spending $8.25 a month. Seems like a pretty sweet deal to me, for a little joy.​
Worry about "will this snare work for metal?" when you're actually in a metal band. Otherwise, it's kinda putting "the cart before the horse". For some people, it will work. For others, it won't. You need to figure out if it'll work for you. And certainly, you'll practice before you gig, in this metal band .... so there'll be plenty of time to figure out if the drum will work, or not. And if you need to buy another snare, then that's what you do.​
 

AirborneSFC

Gold Member
My Benny Greb cuts well and has a deep sound. Its 13"x5.75" beech shelled snare. I have heard other snares smaller than what you would normally expect have a great sound.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Thanks! It's a great sounding little snare, but please don't regard it as sounding typical for it's type. It's a pretty special instrument in the hands of a pretty special player (pictured below).
If that snare is as thick as it looks, it must be the warmest piccolo snare made!

Is that maple?
 

nickg

Silver Member
i could never see myself using anything less than a 5X14" for a main snare, though i have a 7x12 on the side as an auxiliary snare.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
If that snare is as thick as it looks, it must be the warmest piccolo snare made!

Is that maple?
No Otto, it's mostly bubinga but with maple highlights. Just for future reference, a thick shell is usually the opposite of warm. Stave shells do buck the trend however, but only to a degree. If that drum had a ply shell of the same thickness, it would be very bright indeed.

Well, you're talking a whole different universe of drum there, in the same general size category.
Gorgeous snare drum you posted there, and most likely worth every cent. Always good to see examples from more of the spectrum of what's available.
But someone like the OP, who paid $140 for a whole kit is probably unlikely to spring for something like that.
Maybe in the future.
I completely agree, & that's why I wanted to make it very clear that this drum is an exception. I put it up as an example of what can be achieved with a very shallow snare shell. Rather than going with the OP's specific situation, I was responding more to the thread title.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Great bit of theory there! Thanks!

My only experience with a thick shelled snare really seemed to send an even round set of frequencies next to some of the thinner shelled snares I've played...(what I tend to equate to the idea of 'warm')

Never tried a staved design...

Thanks for that...you got me thinking!
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
Anyways - funny story (or not), about that Mapex picollo snare. I gave it a try for a bit, and really liked it on its own. The size is great, the sound is great, but the volume seemed a bit low.
So I traded it in on a Ludwig 14x5. No sooner was that little snare gone and I started to miss its good points.

So I bought it back again - ha ha. Lost a little bit of money on that deal, but I think it's worth it.
 
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Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Is that a new type of rock? I haven't heard of it before - ha ha.
Ah, the perils of the elusive N. Although in the course of general conversation in my circles, the word can be heard frequently. It stands to reason that the Freudian slip was bound to happen at some stage.

I'd better fix that so as to save some poor unsuspecting Quaker from the shock:)
 

Wackamole

Member
Swap your snare for your bass drum and put a kick on it, and put a giant snappy on your bass drum now snare and get an extra low snare stand to hold your now 80's-arenafied snare. It'll be AWESOME.
 

PDL

Senior Member
You said you like the tone so there's is your answer, what other people think doesn't matter, It's up to you to make it work in a rock environment. I use a Sonor Lite piccalo and play in a Black Metal band and an old school hardcore band and it works because I make it work.
 
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