Phases....

A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
all the musicians I know...myself included...go through these phases where they are really into something and study it tirelessly and thoroughly enjoy every minute of it

its all part of the journey we are on I guess

well for the past month or so my "phase" has been left hands

drummers left hands and how each one uses it in his or her own unique way

for example...Buddy Rich....his left hand almost never stops ....its like the shading in a sleeve tattoo that pulls together a bunch of pieces

there are 2 guys in particular who I have been studying ..Steve Jordan and Keith Carlock....mostly Keith because his left hand is so intriguing to me ....love the way both of these guys grace

while studying Keith in depth I realized a basically has 2 go to ghosting patterns that he uses in just about everything he plays

so much fun to learn this stuff and sort of pick up some characteristics of these guys styles

so what Im wondering is....whats your phase at the moment?
 

kauaiplayer

Member
while studying Keith in depth I realized a basically has 2 go to ghosting patterns that he uses in just about everything he plays
Please share the patterns!
I've been working with David Garibaldi's Future Sounds, so I've really been digging through beat displacements. Good fodder for steering wheel drumming too.
 

Numberless

Platinum Member
Jazz drummers, jazz in general. It's funny, I never ever in a million years thought I would be a jazz drummer when I first started playing (and I'm not, but I'm learning) and yet here I am, completely in love with this form of music. Right now I'm studying Max Roach and Roy Haynes, transcribing an Art Blakey solo and familiarizing myself with Coltrane's earlier music and I couldn't be happier!
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
Jazz drummers, jazz in general. It's funny, I never ever in a million years thought I would be a jazz drummer when I first started playing (and I'm not, but I'm learning) and yet here I am, completely in love with this form of music. Right now I'm studying Max Roach and Roy Haynes, transcribing an Art Blakey solo and familiarizing myself with Coltrane's earlier music and I couldn't be happier!
Numberless, you're the man. It makes me happy to come across younger musicians who fall in love with the music. Following your journey into the music is a rewarding one for me. It's uncommon these days, which makes it more special. The bug bit me when I was still in my teens and to say not many others my age were digging it would be an understatement. You've got the feel for the music already in your playing. Very impressive. I'm in your corner, man.

To the topic of the thread, yeah, I am all about phases. My thing lately has been related to left hand technique and includes some of the same drummers. But in my case, I'm fascinated by how different drummers go about nailing perfect rimshots on efvery backbeat. Watching guys like Vinnie, Jordan, Carlock, Gadd and Jojo is very inspiring. They all have their own thing but they all get it done.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
For the last three years I've been trying to learn to groove at low volume - it's still not easy for me but I'm getting better at it all the time.
 

SergiuM

Senior Member
For the last three years I've been trying to learn to groove at low volume - it's still not easy for me but I'm getting better at it all the time.
VERY hard to do! I feel like I'm straining myself when i try to play quietly.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
VERY hard to do! I feel like I'm straining myself when i try to play quietly.
Yeah, the danger is that you use your natural stroke and then get muscles working against your usual muscles to pull back the volume. All that tension. Just lowering the height of my stroke is hard for me after years of hitting from 30 - 60 cms!
 
I'm in a practicing phase right now. Haven't ever stopped playing, but it's been a while since I've studied.

Also working on playing left handed, with the hope that it will strengthen my weak side.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
I've been working on a bunch of 4-way stuff- working through the swing section of Dahlgren & Fine, and working on the usual jazz coordination things vs. the afro 6/8 bell pattern. Working them up from the book is hard, even more so to get them into your playing in any kind of controlled way. I think it's developing some back channels into some new things that will come out in improvising; it's good conditioning as well. I've been going between that and a lot of practicing in 5 recently.
 

?uesto

Silver Member
I'm on Carlock at the moment as well, coming off of Steve Jordan. We must be the John Mayer of drum enthusiasts...

I've been listening so heavily to everything Carlock does, from Steely Dan records to Steely Dan shows to everything with Wayne Krantz, Oz Noy, Rudder, and Tal Wilkenfeld.

While not possessing the chops Dave Weckl or Steve Smith may, I think Carlock will go down in history as one of the greatest drummers of our generation. (That's used a bit loosely since I think I'm a lot younger than you guys). But I think studying him and his work and his concepts/ideas in regards to music has done for me than just about anything else.
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
I'm on Carlock at the moment as well, coming off of Steve Jordan. We must be the John Mayer of drum enthusiasts...

I've been listening so heavily to everything Carlock does, from Steely Dan records to Steely Dan shows to everything with Wayne Krantz, Oz Noy, Rudder, and Tal Wilkenfeld.

While not possessing the chops Dave Weckl or Steve Smith may, I think Carlock will go down in history as one of the greatest drummers of our generation. (That's used a bit loosely since I think I'm a lot younger than you guys). But I think studying him and his work and his concepts/ideas in regards to music has done for me than just about anything else.
hell yeah bro...I'm all over everything he has touched right now

I'm studying his every move and I love it

in a strange kind of way he is sort of a one trick pony...I don't mean that in a bad way..... that one trick is absolutely bananas

in august I'll spend a week studying with Keith in Cleveland and I cannot wait

do you have the Big Picture DVD?

the PDF has amazing insight to his approach

some of the things he does go by so freakin fast that its hard to comprehend....but the PDFs really break it all down

fantastic !!!
 

Messerschmitt

Senior Member
Well i`m not sure i`m as progressist as you are but...
My two phases at the moment are 1.) jazz, and 2.) left hand & foot. I can`t really play a kit as i don`t have a rehearsal space at the moment but i`m studying Clayton Cameron`s Brushworks and just about anything i could find. I`m really interested in brushes and in jazz in general, it`s pretty sad i neglected it all these years (metalheads listening to jazz?) but anyway i didn`t even see myself playing such stuff.
Regarding the left side strengthening , as i can`t really play right now i`m doing regular stuff i do with my right hand, with my left hand (or foot) so they`ll feel natural for me. I`m basically training my ambidexterity.
Also i`m really into Jojo Mayer lately, i just love that guy, i try to "steal" stuff from him, i`ve even transcribed some grooves and fills...
 

deafdrummer

Junior Member
Jazz drummers, jazz in general. It's funny, I never ever in a million years thought I would be a jazz drummer when I first started playing (and I'm not, but I'm learning) and yet here I am, completely in love with this form of music. Right now I'm studying Max Roach and Roy Haynes, transcribing an Art Blakey solo and familiarizing myself with Coltrane's earlier music and I couldn't be happier!
I'm headed in the opposite direction from you, then. When I was in school, I was in all the musical activities, including choir in the last year and a half of high school. At that time, I listened to some of the oldies like Floyd Cramer, Homer and Jethro, The Bellamy Brothers (step-cousins of mine), the old jazz numbers, and rockabilly (I graduated from high school in '85). When I got to high school, I added on modern jazz like Stanley Clarke, Yellow Jackets, Spiro Giro, Weather Report, etc. In college, I pulled back from the older stuff and went to 80's dance music like Dead or Alive, New Order, Information Society, Yello, OMD, Modern English etc. while keeping a foot in with Stanley Clarke. Then in the early 90s, I found Yothu Yindi and have basically been looking for anything that gets my attention sonically. At the turn of the century, I got into Internet bands, and then I watched School of Rock, which turned me to Rock, and I finally understood what it was about and had to undemonize it (but it didn't take long). I have enjoyed rock since. However, I don't typically like being in that scene sometimes because of destructive behaviors like drugs, bad food, alcohol (because I'm health-minded). And finally, I hadn't played out for some time. I would go to Texas Big Beat once a year, and I would find someone, and we would jam quietly in my apartment or jam full-out in the person's studio.

Last fall saw me questioning my life's path while out of state, and when I came back, I knew I had to start making changes, including where I live, what I want to do for a living, how I want to live my life, and what I want to do musically. Now, I just want to explore the didgeridoo and how the drums fit with that as a means of breaking out of the western music system into something I've never done before. It's all part of my "devolution," which is the opposite of what you're doing as a musician. I'm doing this as a return to a "less evolved state" as a musician which goes hand-in-hand with my wanting to simplify my life and go where people normally don't go, which is going in the direction that supports my experience as having been in a linguistically isolated state for so long. Doing complicated or civilized things tends to lose my interest, and I find myself wanting to retreat to "simply being." Just do whatever I want, whenever I want. The make-believe that the world surrounds itself in is simply not that important to me, and I know I don't need it to be me.

Just simply be...

Maybe something else will come along to grab my attention and steer me in that direction out of drums n' didge in a few years, just like rock music caused me to move from Austin to Houston to play in a band.
 
Last edited:

?uesto

Silver Member
hell yeah bro...I'm all over everything he has touched right now

I'm studying his every move and I love it

in a strange kind of way he is sort of a one trick pony...I don't mean that in a bad way..... that one trick is absolutely bananas

in august I'll spend a week studying with Keith in Cleveland and I cannot wait

do you have the Big Picture DVD?

the PDF has amazing insight to his approach

some of the things he does go by so freakin fast that its hard to comprehend....but the PDFs really break it all down

fantastic !!!
Yes! I watch the DVD every few weeks and gain more and more understanding about what he's doing on just about anything I'm listening to. And I do have the PDF. Definitely helps understand things in a way that doesn't "go by" like on a video. It's there on paper and I can work with it and practice it. Great stuff all around.
 

deafdrummer

Junior Member
You mean the "Let Your Love Flow" guys? Loved that song. Was all over the radio in the late 1970s.. tell them they still have at least one fan here on DW :)
Yep, that's them, and they still perform, last I heard. That song was always my favorite song from them. Nothing else is like it because of the chords they play in that song. It's got a rich sound to it with a lot of memories from that time.
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
I am trying (again) to learn the free stroke, really learn it, and incorporate it into every voice on the kit and every playing situation. It's pretty hard to break these old habits.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I am still trying to learn how to master the simplest stroke I can make, in perfect time, at many different dynamic levels, from barely audible, to why would I even need to hit a drum this hard?
 

Fuo

Platinum Member
Please share the patterns!
I've been working with David Garibaldi's Future Sounds, so I've really been digging through beat displacements. Good fodder for steering wheel drumming too.
+1 my teacher started me on Future Sounds a couple weeks ago. Working on "Permutation Studies #4" now. Its a fun book so far.
 

haredrums

Silver Member
Cool discussion guys,

I guess the big things for me recently have been trying to get an uptempo ride cymbal beat like Lois Hayes (check out "Easy To Love" from "Nippon Soul" if you haven't already), uptempo comping that doesn't sound strained, fast/smooth single strokes in groups of four/eight around the kit (surprisingly difficult for me), and learning the music of Radiohead.
 
Top