PBQ ? Any info on this kit please

Crusty

Member
Never heard of it. But was cheap and has a gretsch Tom stand. So I brought it.

Very novice drummer actually a bass player playing Stu Hamms old rig from 1996 tour ☺☺☺ I worship it., no idea of drum kits to buy so hope a good starter kit. Ideas of actual brand ?
 

Attachments

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
It could be a 'stencil kit' from Japan. They were basically knockoff drums imported to compete with American manufacturers back in 60s and 70s.
 

Drifter in the Dark

Silver Member
Never heard of it. But was cheap and has a gretsch Tom stand. So I brought it.

Very novice drummer actually a bass player playing Stu Hamms old rig from 1996 tour ☺☺☺ I worship it., no idea of drum kits to buy so hope a good starter kit. Ideas of actual brand ?
Honestly, the drum rack is probably the best part of the whole deal! The square tubing makes me think it's a Pearl DR-80, which is a high-quality, professional-grade unit. If you wanted to upgrade at some point in the future, you could built your kit around the rack-- all you'd have to do is get a shell pack (drums only, no stands), and some new cymbals!
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
When you look at the interior of the drums .... does the wood grain look really open and rough? If so, it's probably a Luan aka Philippine Mahogany. And yeah, that's probably a stencil kit. Probably as good a starter kit as any $300-$400 kit today. And the rack does look like a DR-80 .... but I don't recall the DR-80 having horizontal stabilizers on the floor. Just pipe. Also, I never saw a DR-80 that wasn't black. Perhaps the horizontal bottoms were added, from the Icon series (what the DR-80/DR-100 evolved into). In any event, if you got everything cheap enough, you scored.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
The DR80/100 also had pivot points at the corners. It was almost like a bike chain link with the legs in the center. This rack does not have that. It is most likely an ICON rack. Check it out.

40009-S000240203-3.jpeg
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
Pico Brasille Querrera was a drummer during the 40's in the Dominican Republic. Prior to the Castro takeover of Cuba he moved to Havana in hopes of making a name for himself and thereby transitioning to the United States as the King of Rumba. Unfortunately it took much longer than anticipated and he was caught up in the Cuban revolution. His drums were destroyed by the uprising and his life was in jeopardy so he jumped ship. Literally. Stowed away on a freighter he thought was headed to America, he found himself instead deboarding in Japan. To say the least, a Latino in "the orient" has difficulty communicating.
Long story short (and believe me the story is long) Pico found work in a wood shop and was able to build a set of drums. Amazed at his handywork, the shop owner had him make more for sale to the Japanese. To give them a credible allure, Yuka Noshini told Pico to use his initials as branding. Hence.....PBQ.
 

Erberderber

Senior Member
That's a great story! How can you say there's nothing special about those drums after hearing that?! It'll be a great anecdote to tell and coversation starter if anyone asks about them.
 

Crusty

Member
Pico Brasille Querrera was a drummer during the 40's in the Dominican Republic. Prior to the Castro takeover of Cuba he moved to Havana in hopes of making a name for himself and thereby transitioning to the United States as the King of Rumba. Unfortunately it took much longer than anticipated and he was caught up in the Cuban revolution. His drums were destroyed by the uprising and his life was in jeopardy so he jumped ship. Literally. Stowed away on a freighter he thought was headed to America, he found himself instead deboarding in Japan. To say the least, a Latino in "the orient" has difficulty communicating.
Long story short (and believe me the story is long) Pico found work in a wood shop and was able to build a set of drums. Amazed at his handywork, the shop owner had him make more for sale to the Japanese. To give them a credible allure, Yuka Noshini told Pico to use his initials as branding. Hence.....PBQ.
Thank you so much
Great story ☺ I'll look after them.
 

Crusty

Member
When you look at the interior of the drums .... does the wood grain look really open and rough? If so, it's probably a Luan aka Philippine Mahogany. And yeah, that's probably a stencil kit. Probably as good a starter kit as any $300-$400 kit today. And the rack does look like a DR-80 .... but I don't recall the DR-80 having horizontal stabilizers on the floor. Just pipe. Also, I never saw a DR-80 that wasn't black. Perhaps the horizontal bottoms were added, from the Icon series (what the DR-80/DR-100 evolved into). In any event, if you got everything cheap enough, you scored.
It's quite smooth. Dark wood grain. The 10" tom is totalay differs. Like a white with specs through it.
 

Attachments

wildbill

Platinum Member
Pico Brasille Querrera was a drummer during the 40's in the Dominican Republic. Prior to the Castro takeover of Cuba he moved to Havana in hopes of making a name for himself and thereby transitioning to the United States as the King of Rumba. Unfortunately it took much longer than anticipated and he was caught up in the Cuban revolution. His drums were destroyed by the uprising and his life was in jeopardy so he jumped ship. Literally. Stowed away on a freighter he thought was headed to America, he found himself instead deboarding in Japan. To say the least, a Latino in "the orient" has difficulty communicating.
Long story short (and believe me the story is long) Pico found work in a wood shop and was able to build a set of drums. Amazed at his handywork, the shop owner had him make more for sale to the Japanese. To give them a credible allure, Yuka Noshini told Pico to use his initials as branding. Hence.....PBQ.

OK - I take it back. Cool, rare, and badass.

Everything has a story, and those drums have an interesting one.
 
Top