Outrages prices for used gear that you want.

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Offer them what you are willing to pay. They may take it, they may not. All you have to do is ask and see.

If you REALLY want something, sometimes you may have to overpay a little to get EXACTLY what you want. For example, if my grandfather played guitar, and I knew someone was selling it...and on the surface it's only worth $1000, but he's charging $2000, chances are I'd go ahead and pay the extra money to have exactly what I want.

You don't have to ask yourself what it's worth. You have to ask yourself, "What is this worth to ME?"
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I have a few takes...

First is supply and demand. They have it, You want it.... if you cant find a cheaper one as much as it sucks you'll end up buying some of their overpriced stuff or someone will. Your already thinking about it. lol

Second, impulse buys.. People list stuff very high and often get it. Or "uneducated" 'buyers.

I buy and sell alot online and see this myself and it DOES blow my mind, but it's good business. Ask high, because you ARE going to get lowballed and take a bit less.

Same tactic as a store constantly keeping their prices at double and having 50% off sales... Seems like your getting a steal rather than paying the same price with no deal.

Or you could just be like me. Maybe the wife tells you to get rid of something so you say "okay i'll post it online honey". And you post the price near what you bought it for because you really don't want it to go.. I have done this a few times and people have offered asking price. At that point I guess i'll sell it.


If the seller is not in a rush they usual post it way to high, wait, drop it a bit, wait and keep going. If they are motivated that is when you can get a deal.


To me drums retain value. They are wood. You can see them and check them. Cymbals are pieces of metal you smash. they could have hairline cracks in them not viable. A ride cymbal will most likely last forever, and bronze/brass isn't cheap. A china or crash is another story.

My biggest issue is 15 year old EKITS going for thousands. I get that you overpaid a ton for that thing but it's now old technology. New heads won't fix that.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
You can buy some pretty nice entry to mid level shell packs new nowadays for modest costs relatively. After christmas I decided to look for a cheap used kit for future gigging possibilities-something I can abuse and not worry about but still be a decent kit. I was looking at the older Mapex Meridian maples but I was at a local music store and talking to this "dude" about my interest and he told me he could be competitive for online pricing. I wanted a maple kit and wanted to try some larger sizes so I went with a new Pearl Decade maple shell pack 13, 16, 24 for like $580 all told-I'm like dang giving it away. Which is about the online cost it seems. The kick size sold me on this kit-always wanted to try one. I just got it and it comes in a relatively small box-it's all nested in there. The shells are extremely light and thin and though the UT heads (the tom reso heads are some funky model almost like a hazy so thin and soft) it sounds pretty dang good. I'm digging the larger sizes too so I'm pretty happy right now.
 

Patz

Senior Member
I always just keep in mind that top end cymbals are fairly priced somewhere in the 8-10 dollars per inch range. Double braced boom stands in any working condition will be 30 bucks at a minimum. Shell packs can be all over the place, but even the top end shells are only worth half what they cost new. Exceptions would be something like vintage VistaLites. Oddly enough, it's the cheaper shells that seem to retain value better. A decent condition pack that was $400 new still will fetch 300 a few years later, but if you're lucky you can catch one with a complete set of cheap cymbals and average hardware for only slightly more. That's how it is in my area at least..
 

singleflammedmill

Senior Member
The market sets the price. If you really want it, you'll pay more than you want to. Also, if the seller thinks the price is fair, they really don't care what you think they should sell it for and aren't likely to adjust the price. Another consideration is that some people don't NEED to sell things right away and are willing to wait for someone to arrive at their price.
I often buy and sell gear and as a seller I set a price and I'm relatively firm about it.
I'll not lower my price because some unknown guys thinks it's too high.

Some sellers are unrealistic but some buyers are unrealistic too.

I've a guy that lowballed me on some of my ads for at least 10 years and never buys anything.
I sold every items that he lowballed on at or close to my asking price.
The worst is that this guy takes himself very seriously and ask many questions before making his lowball offers.
 
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Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I think a private sale of a used item more than a few years old really shouldn't be put up for more than 50% of the new price.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Some of these ads irk me too. But there is a sucker born every minute. Some sellers are just putting up an item for a ridiculous price waiting for a 'sucker' who knows nothing to buy it.
I have seen people re-post the same stupid item at a ridiculous price for 5 years or more.
 
G

Ghostnote

Guest
I'm guilty of paying a little more than I should for cymbals, but when I've been looking a long time for something discontinued, sometimes I just have to grab it because I don't know if another one will ever come along.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Why?

Some items conserve their value better than others.
I'm sure there are lots of exceptions to my general statement; for extremely in-demand items, or unique/rare items... But that's usually a case where the asking price on the market has nothing to do with the original sale price anyway.

I'm really aiming more at the guys who try and sell mass-produced drum items for 80% of the new value, knowing full well they've been hitting it with sticks for years, and the buyer will lose all the benefits of the original purchase with the retailer.

Like others have said, though, lots of folks have more money than sense, and will impulse buy stupidly priced items. It's still kind of a free country, I think.
 

whiteknightx

Silver Member
yeah, I'm on board with Dr Watso. 50% of the original sale price is pretty much the standard for used stuff in good shape if you want to sell it in a reasonable amount of time. Move up or down from there depending on what it is, and condition.

And my experience selling things on line like kijiji here in Canada, the first 24 hours is a bunch of ridiculous low ball offers that just piss me off. So no I'm not going to haggle on something at all, at least until the buyer shows up in person to look at it. And I'm not taking a lower offer or trade just because you really want something of mine. I had a guy once wanted to trade me a lesser ride cymbal for a ride cymbal I was selling, that I wasn't interested in, "for the sake of a trade". Uhhh no.
 
J

JohnoWorld

Guest
So I've just bought a couple of Paiste 2000 cymbals, a ride and a crash for £70 each. For a cymbal in good condition (even if it's from the 80's) then I accept this is a good price.

You can then compare that to others who are just asking waaaay over the top for similar things. eg, Paiste 2002 cymbals that have been lathed down are still prices at £150+.

I think the phrase "it's worth what the market is prepared to pay" is misleading because if the price is too high, the market won't buy it. If no-one wants it at all, how long do you have to keep relisting it on ebay before you've spent the equivalent of what its worth?

Years ago I saw a nice Tama 14 x 7 bronze snare for something crazy so I ignored it. 2 years later the same drum was still on ebay at the same price so I sent him an email saying that I am interested but not at that price. Instead of trying to compromise, he just said "no, that's the price, pay it or don't"

I honestly think that some people are just pig-headed, others are chancers, whenever I've seen something sold, it has always been for a price that I agree with. it's the same with everyone on there, they think they can blag but forget that the reason we go to ebay is to buy 2nd hand goods at good prices.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Hey if you want to save money you have to haggle with the price gougers.

It's not worth it to me, but some people are really good at that kind of thing. The only thing I ever got from CL is the drums I gig with. I needed an inexpensive set for a rehearsal space that I could leave set up. So I started looking with the intention of getting a bass drum, a floor tom, and 1 or 2 racks. Straight away I saw a set of PDP's in White Onyx (WMP) that was about 2 miles from my house. For $125.00! 22, 12, 14 plus a 14 x 5 matching snare. I added a 10" tom and later got a newer PDP concept maple 16" legged floor tom and re-wrapped it to match.

CL is great because for me the shipping messes everything up. I have die cast hoops for sale at 35 each which is a little below market. To me it doesn't make sense to go ebay, then I have to take my time and ship it out...not worth it. Someone local can drive by and pick it up, that's the way to go.

CL = haggle, the way most people price their gear. It is outrageous. Rediculous even. Every once in a while you snag a good deal. Ask Red Menace.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I honestly think that some people are just pig-headed, others are chancers, whenever I've seen something sold, it has always been for a price that I agree with. it's the same with everyone on there, they think they can blag but forget that the reason we go to ebay is to buy 2nd hand goods at good prices.
I've seen it several times, like an alarming amount of times where people are literally delusional about how much their stuff is worth. I think they convince themselves that when they go to sell it they'll get "x" and then just get stubborn when nobody wants their stuff for what they think it's worth.
 
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