'Open handed' hi hat speed tips?

Leftie117

Junior Member
So I play open-handed meaning I play the hats with my left (still play ride with right). The problem with this is that two-handed hi hat beats are evan more annoying to play. Any advice?
 

Drumsinhisheart

Silver Member
So I play open-handed meaning I play the hats with my left (still play ride with right). The problem with this is that two-handed hi hat beats are evan more annoying to play. Any advice?
I don't understand the problem. Are you saying double strokes with your left hand are annoying to pull off? If not, I would think if your left hand is the weaker, using it for playing time would strengthen it, and doing any two-handed strokes would be easier. all around the kit.
 

BradGunnerSGT

Silver Member
When you play "two-handed" on the hi-hat, do you mean something like playing a sixteenth note pattern on the hats? Like this?

Code:
Hihat | xxxx -xxx xxxx -xxx |
Snare | ---- x--- ---- x--- |  
Kick  | x--- ---- x-x- ---- |
If so, then you are right, it is probably hard to do a "LRLR LRLR LRLR LRLR" sticking, since the left hand has to switch over and hit the snare on the backbeat. You say you play the ride with your right hand, could you try sticking it "RLRL RLRL RLRL RLRL" so that the right hand is the one that switches back and forth to the snare the way a "cross-handed" player would do it?

An alternative is to do paradiddles "LRLL RLRR LRLL RLRR" so that the right had is still the one to switch back and forth.
 
I'm not sure I totally understand your issue, but I agree with the others in that two handed hi-hat patterns don't necessarily need to be a problem. For example, as others have said, you can play paradiddles so that your right hand lands on the snare drum at the appropriate time.

How did you play two handed hihat parts in the past? I don't quite know why it would be any different playing them on an open-handed kit, but again I may simply be misunderstanding your issue. Thanks!
 

Jankowske

Senior Member
Assuming that you're left-handed and that basic ergonomics is your problem, learn to play 16th patterns leading with your right hand. But every trve 1337 kvlt open-hander either has their hats in front of them or a set either side.
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
So I play open-handed meaning I play the hats with my left (still play ride with right). The problem with this is that two-handed hi hat beats are evan more annoying to play. Any advice?
There are two reasons to choose a sticking.

1. Ease of performing a particular passage.

2. Sound: a single stroke roll doesn't sound the same as a double stroke roll, for instance.

You're having problems with #1. Change your sticking. Presumably you chose to play open handed because it was easier. Following the same logic, choose a sticking that allows you to play the passage with ease.

In general, I work on trying to lead with the hand that corresponds with the direction I'm moving around the drums when playing duple rhythms (8ths, 16ths, etc.) Move to the right: RH lead. Move to the left: LH lead.
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
An alternative is to do paradiddles "LRLL RLRR LRLL RLRR" so that the right had is still the one to switch back and forth.
Another great suggestion. But your groove will have a different lope to it than if you played it with alternating hands. Might work, might not.
 
M

MarySeefs

Guest
Open handed hi hat speed tips

As a newyears resolution I am learning how to play open handed. I am a right handed drummer an would like to learn both ways I was wondering if anyone has any tips or good exercises to get started?
Thanks- David

Wonderful herbal ] arthritis medications or?.. "NoFlam". What do you make of it?
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
Re: Open handed hi hat speed tips

As a newyears resolution I am learning how to play open handed. I am a right handed drummer an would like to learn both ways I was wondering if anyone has any tips or good exercises to get started?
Thanks- David

Wonderful herbal ] arthritis medications or?.. "NoFlam". What do you make of it?
Why not start with the obvious? Practice all your standard 1/4, 1/8, 1/8-triplet, shuffle and one-handed 1/16 note grooves with your LH playing the hihat or ride cymbal pattern.

Are you familiar with the Fatback Exercises from Chaffee's stuff?
 
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