Online Piracy Finally In the Crosshairs

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drumming sort of person

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/william-buckley-jr/online-piracy-finally-in-_b_5086820.html

Why are search companies, like Google, so determined to maintain the status quo? The answer is simple. For all the claims about innovation and the power of the Internet to drive our ailing economy, the Internet is totally dependent upon content. Without it, they simply have warehouses filled with empty servers and endless bandwidth. The key to their explosive financial growth is dependent upon unlimited, cheap access to quality content.
 

dboomer

Senior Member
YouTube is probably the worlds biggest pirate. They profit from the ads they sell while you go watch someone else's copyrighted material. I would be happy to pay but there is no mechanism to do so.

Think of this ... if YouTube had a button on the bottom of the page where you could donate even 1¢ any time you watched or listened to anything I would be happy to do so. And even just a single penny would make a huge difference to the artists compared to making .00000nothing that Spotify and others pay.
 
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drumming sort of person

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if you try to flag them, you get this. Like, the only reason they're "unable" to accept third party notifications is because they made a policy that they won't.
Just ignore that and post the notice saying that you represent the artist. I do it all the time. The person who posted the content will take it down and then just post it again, or have someone else post it. But at least they'll get a ding on their account.
 
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Matt Bo Eder

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I wonder if it's too late to do anything about this? YouTube and Google are such a part of techno-society, with at least one generation of kids brought up thinking it's ok to just take copyrighted music works to have, that any laws passed would be like closing the barn doors after the horses have already gotten out. How do you suddenly stop people just taking what's out there?

I'm definitely not a "doomsday" kinda guy, but when you combine artists doing anything they can to get their name and product out there, including just giving it away, and established artists doing what they can to maintain any kind of notoriety they already have, and maybe giving things away (like U2 did), what kind of law would regulate that? Who wants a law to regulate?
 

mmulcahy1

Platinum Member
As a teacher, Iv'e become very good at scrounging what I need to make things work. If I see anything I can use in class for my students, I'll take it - Copyrights be damned!!
 
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Matt Bo Eder

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The laws already exist. They just need to be enforced and strengthened, and they will.
Like so many of our other laws. I get it, and I think in an ideal world it would work, but considering our track record of enforcing laws already on the books, one can only hope.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
The laws already exist. They just need to be enforced and strengthened, and they will.
Can't agree, for if they were to be enforced, they already would be.

Only a handful of artists of late have taken steps to protect their work (Taylor Swift and her Apple Music issue comes to mind). Many others, like the aforementioned U2, know how the current market is with music, video & printed material. As such, they put out enough to get the next generation to love what they do & then charge them later.

So many "YouTube-to-mp3/mp4" converters exist now that anyone can rip a song or video posted on that site & keep it for themselves.
No artist paid, no royalties given...nothing.

Just free.

Yeah, you hear of the occasional kid getting investigated ala "Lars Ulrich & Napster", but no real follow up happens.
The Feds have their fingers in the hole, but the whole dam is crumbling around them.

So it really boils down to personal integrity. If you're against it, don't copy or rip it.
If you're not, then enjoy the free material as no one is really doing anything about it.
 

DrumWild

Senior Member
I suspect that the big guys don't crack down on the thieves, because the big guys are thieves themselves.

MTV stole from one of my bands, Noodle Muffin, twice. Here is one of the instances.

When they were contacted, they replied with the message that "we are big, you are small, you should be grateful we picked your song, and you have bragging rights."

No band name or recognition on the screen. Bragging rights? Those don't pay bills. Sure, it was a small clip, but theft is theft.

I've seen them note the name of the songs on some more modern shows today, such as "Catfish." Back then, nothing.

It was odd that they stole from us, especially after refusing to play one of our music videos. Not good enough to play on MTV, but good enough to steal from.

Today, we're at least two generations deep into a culture that does not see why they should pay for music. There's a misconception that it does not cost anything.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
If copyright violations were criminal and enforced, every single person I've ever known would be in jail.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
What a huge waste of time and unfair burden on content sites.

There's literally no possible way for them to ever, ever keep up on policing everyone's rights to digital, easily distributed content.

Give it up already and make a living selling something physical or do it performance wise. You aren't going to stop the internet, and you aren't going to stop people's consumption of what they want on the internet.

If they want to actually control and sell digital content that's easy to re-produce and pirate, then they need to get with the program, make the access extremely easy and at a price point where most people will be willing to part with the dollars for something they could get free with some effort.
 
D

drumming sort of person

Guest
What a huge waste of time and unfair burden on content sites.

There's literally no possible way for them to ever, ever keep up on policing everyone's rights to digital, easily distributed content.

Give it up already and make a living selling something physical or do it performance wise. You aren't going to stop the internet, and you aren't going to stop people's consumption of what they want on the internet.

If they want to actually control and sell digital content that's easy to re-produce and pirate, then they need to get with the program, make the access extremely easy and at a price point where most people will be willing to part with the dollars for something they could get free with some effort.
You know absolutely NOTHING of which you write. Please do some research before spouting out nonsense. Google is making BILLIONS of dollars exploiting the creations of others. The solution is simple. They need to be forced, via legislation, to distribute their stolen revenue, and then prosecuted for their monopolistic ways. The European Union has already begun.

A huge part of the problem is the nonsensical arguments flouted by anonymous clowns like YOU who wish for things to stay as they are. What you don't realize is that YOUR livelihood is next.

Once these monopolies are forced to change their ways, the money will start getting to the creators.
 
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