On stage monitoring set ups

Kerrym

Junior Member
Hey Guys,

I would like to know what set ups you have for on stage monitoring of the drums

I use in-ears and have real trouble receiving a decent mix from the majority of the sound guys I work with.The kick is never right in the mix etc...I would like a little more control.
Most importantly,Kick,snare,Hi hat and overhead.

Any info would be great regarding this.

Cheers,

Kez
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Oh man, what a can of worms! Be aware that you're asking the soundguy to change his normal routine to accomodate you. There might not be time for it, or he might be lazy or in a bad mood.

Simplest idea is to carry a Y-cable and mic cable, and split the signal coming off the kick mic. Next to the drums, you'll need a small mixer with at least 2 XLR inputs: one for the kick mic, and one for the send from the monitor or FOH mixer. You'll request that the send from the mixer should have no kick signal, because you'll be able to turn that up or down yourself.

A more elaborate idea is to do the same thing 8 times with a mic splitter box (Radial makes a 1-rack-space, 8 channel unit), and an 8-channel D-sub 25 to XLR snake (15 feet should be long enough). The drum mics would then connect first to your splitter box, and then your snake would connect to the stage box (where the drum mics are normally connected). Then, you'll need a mixer with 8 XLR inputs, and another D-sub 25 to XLR snake (3 feel long). In this scenario, you have to lug around a mixer, mic splitter, and cabling, and then tell the soundguy to disconnect all the drum mics from the stage box so you can connect them to your splitter, and then connect your snake to his stage box. Unless you're playing the same club or with the same soundguys all the time, you're going to make someone very upset with you!
 

Kerrym

Junior Member
Man,thanks for the response!

Yeah it really is a mind bender.I play all sorts of different venues with different sound guys each time.I'm seldom happy with the mixes I receive.I'm very picky because it affects my playing if the sound is poor.

There is a little box that Shure used to make.The PM4.It has 4 XLR inputs and 4 out the back.Something like that would be ideal as it has splitter inbuilt.It is a little pricey and there is the bummer of no EQ in my monitors.

There are little boxes that can be used.Rolls make one etc...but it only has room for the kick.
I'll check out mics splitters.

Decisions eh... haha. Thanks bro
 

BradGunnerSGT

Silver Member
Hey Guys,

I would like to know what set ups you have for on stage monitoring of the drums

I use in-ears and have real trouble receiving a decent mix from the majority of the sound guys I work with.The kick is never right in the mix etc...I would like a little more control.
Most importantly,Kick,snare,Hi hat and overhead.

Any info would be great regarding this.

Cheers,

Kez
You have 2 choices, you can split off those mics into a small mixer that you control, or you can get really friendly with the sound guys. A combination of the two may be required. ;)
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Man,thanks for the response!

Yeah it really is a mind bender.I play all sorts of different venues with different sound guys each time.I'm seldom happy with the mixes I receive.I'm very picky because it affects my playing if the sound is poor.

There is a little box that Shure used to make.The PM4.It has 4 XLR inputs and 4 out the back.Something like that would be ideal as it has splitter inbuilt.It is a little pricey and there is the bummer of no EQ in my monitors.

There are little boxes that can be used.Rolls make one etc...but it only has room for the kick.
I'll check out mics splitters.

Decisions eh... haha. Thanks bro
You're welcome!

I had another idea that might be worth a try. In addition to the Y-cable kick mic, also bring with you a pair of overhead mics, a mic stand, and a stereo mic clip. Set up the additional mic stand and overheads right behind your seat, about a foot higher than your head while sitting. Use a mixer with 4 XLR inputs, and connect the kick, overheads (yours), and send from the sound guy. This way, you can pan the overheads (slightly) left and right, which will really open up the drum sound! You won't have to rely on the drums mix from the soundguy, and it's pretty easy to tell him mid-performance that you need more guitar or less bass or whatever.

Also, the overheads will pick up a bit of stage volume, so you should be able to hear some guitar and maybe some bass from them. Plus, you don't have to reconnect any of the soundguy's cables!
 

Kerrym

Junior Member
Thanks again for the replies!

Mmm...food for thought.

It's true, if you find a sound guy that you like to work with then this is not really an issue.

I like the idea of the overheads.Opening up the sound would really make for a more enjoyable experience.Nothing worse than having a really enclosed drum sound when your playing a big room.

Cheers guys!

Kez
 
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