On drums...Stewart Copeland!

robertemery

Junior Member
Forgive my blatant appeal to you Police and Stewart Copeland fans, but if you are interested, I have recently recorded an in-depth interview with Stewart Copeland which was the inaugural episode of my new podcast, Backstage with Robert Emery.

If you'd like to hear this, please do visit https://www.robertemery.com/backstage/behind-the-scenes-with-stewart-copeland and take a listen to Behind the Scenes with Stewart Copeland: Why dumb shit makes me happy.
 

Erberderber

Senior Member
Just found it on Youtube. Really enjoyed it. It could have been a 6 part series in itself! That said, I think they did really well to condense all the significant landmarks of drums and drumming over the last 100 years into one hour, so hats off to them.

I also really appreciate the way they weren't scared to include electronic drums and drum machines into it either. I particularly liked the bit with Stephen Morris as he is an example of a drummer who embraced drum programming and whose open mindedness was a catalyst to his success with New Order. Imagine if he'd shunned drum machines, there would be no classics such as Blue Monday, True Faith or, dare I say it, World In Motion.

So this leads to another question: Which areas of drums and drumming that were not included in the doc do you think should have got a mention?

Here's the link.

https://youtu.be/nVgak9w7g_0
 

supermac

Senior Member
Hugely enjoyable programme with great production values and A-list participants.

Stewart was (and is) an incredible game-changing player - and these days he's a creative tour de force, writing operas and books!

This track blew my mind when, as a young drummer, I bought the new Police album, Zenyatta Mondatta...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSShauY8D3w
 

Mustion

Senior Member
Very entertaining! They all stressed the significance of the back beat, which is what makes people want to dance. Ringo being one of the masters at this...
I think about this a lot, as I spend the majority of my time playing Caribbean music which is cut-time and doesn't really have a backbeat in the traditional sense we're used to (although I'll throw one on occasion in for flavor)... I often wonder what its equivalent would be, which I guess would be the "and" of two whereas in pop music it lands on the two and four.
To get an idea of what I mean, check this Tommy Igoe clip...
 

Davo-London

Gold Member
Yup, I saw it.

Thought Chad was particularly illuminating with his views. I don't want to criticise but I would be happy if Stewart went all geeky and spoke more about the groove etc. Sheila E did chat about the ghost notes in funk etc. Anyway, was fun and well done BBC for doing it and Mr. Copeland was a very good choice since he reaches the audiences of both the UK and USA seamlessly. The closing credits were to the sound of Copeland playing with the Police and damn did it sound good ...

Davo
 

Supernoodle

Senior Member
Very entertaining! They all stressed the significance of the back beat, which is what makes people want to dance. Ringo being one of the masters at this...

Actually if you look up "Syncopation" it says that the back beat of western music is probably the most basic and strong example of syncopation.

"Syncopation is used in many musical styles, especially dance music: "All dance music makes use of syncopation and it's often a vital element that helps tie the whole track together".[3] In the form of a back beat, syncopation is used in virtually all contemporary popular music."
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
There was a very entertaining new one hour long documentary on the BBC tonight which hopefully will get to american screens soon. Any other UK members here see it?

It was Stewart Copeland exploring drums as the founding instrument of modern music. He interviews, hangs and drums with loads of A listers including Stanton Moore, Sheila E, Chad Smith and Taylor Hawkins. Bonham is talked about, as is Keith Moon and many others. Chad Smith gives the highest praise to Ringo. Feel is touched on. Elvin Jones is talked about and footage shown; also Ginger Baker.

He interviews the man who invented the famous Linn drum machine, joking with him as to why he wanted to put drummers out of work. Also, they show the 'Synare' drum pad. I had one of those!


Wish everyone here could have seen it. The final thing Copeland says at the end of the programme is "As all us drummers know, hitting things is fun!"

Here's the BBC details on it.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/proginfo/2019/02/on-drums-stewart-copeland
It was really good. Even my wife enjoyed it.
When it showed the clip of Buddy Rich she said "is that sped up"....nope. Then "can you do that"....nope.
:)
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
Nice! Hope we get to see that soon. You’ve now heard it from the master. Hitting things is fun. What other excuse do you need?
 

Merlin5

Gold Member
There was a very entertaining new one hour long documentary on the BBC tonight which hopefully will get to american screens soon. Any other UK members here see it?

It was Stewart Copeland exploring drums as the founding instrument of modern music. He interviews, hangs and drums with loads of A listers including Stanton Moore, Sheila E, Chad Smith and Taylor Hawkins. Bonham is talked about, as is Keith Moon and many others. Chad Smith gives the highest praise to Ringo. Feel is touched on. Elvin Jones is talked about and footage shown; also Ginger Baker.

He interviews the man who invented the famous Linn drum machine, joking with him as to why he wanted to put drummers out of work. Also, they show the 'Synare' drum pad. I had one of those!


Wish everyone here could have seen it. The final thing Copeland says at the end of the programme is "As all us drummers know, hitting things is fun!"

Here's the BBC details on it.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/proginfo/2019/02/on-drums-stewart-copeland
 
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