Not Popular?

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
Is country music popular these days? It seems that salsa music is on the rise, and this is a good thing from a drumming popularity perspective. I guess they both like cowbell so maybe they can play a guejeo on a steel guitar.
 

tcspears

Gold Member
It's going to depend on your area... what's popular in Nashville sin't necessarily popular in Boston, London, Paris, or Hong Kong.

There's a global pop genre which is a mixture of pop music with electronica influences. People like Justin Beiber are currently charting in the US, CA, Europe, and Asia at the same time. In fact, most of the top 40 music across the globe is the same. Looking at the US, UK, and Thailand, it looks like Bruno Mars' "24k" is in the top 20 in all those areas.

Country music is on the rise in parts of the US as it's becoming less country and more pop. There's one radio channel now in Massachusetts that plays country, which there has never been in the past. Still Hip Hop, pop, and rock are the big genres here. NYC is similar, but the style of music will be slightly different.

Salsa music has not really moved much in the US in terms of popularity. Salsa music is from NYC, but it's from the 1960s, so many younger people aren't latching on to it. It's still one of the distinct styles of American music, but like jazz it's largely out of the limelight.


I guess there really isn't an answer to your question, but sites like http://www.lanet.lv/misc/charts/ can help you see what's charting in different countries. As globalized as we are, music is still very local, so everyone's going to have a fairly different answer.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
It's going to depend on your area... what's popular in Nashville sin't necessarily popular in Boston, London, Paris, or Hong Kong.

There's a global pop genre which is a mixture of pop music with electronica influences. People like Justin Beiber are currently charting in the US, CA, Europe, and Asia at the same time. In fact, most of the top 40 music across the globe is the same. Looking at the US, UK, and Thailand, it looks like Bruno Mars' "24k" is in the top 20 in all those areas.

Country music is on the rise in parts of the US as it's becoming less country and more pop. There's one radio channel now in Massachusetts that plays country, which there has never been in the past. Still Hip Hop, pop, and rock are the big genres here. NYC is similar, but the style of music will be slightly different.

Salsa music has not really moved much in the US in terms of popularity. Salsa music is from NYC, but it's from the 1960s, so many younger people aren't latching on to it. It's still one of the distinct styles of American music, but like jazz it's largely out of the limelight.


I guess there really isn't an answer to your question, but sites like http://www.lanet.lv/misc/charts/ can help you see what's charting in different countries. As globalized as we are, music is still very local, so everyone's going to have a fairly different answer.
We had this discussion in another thread, but NY was where the term was coined, for music that immigrants were playing, so I can't really credit NY for salsa.

I have lived a number of places mid-west, upper mid-west, south west, as well as traveled a number of places, and in the US about the only place salsa is not popular is maybe the mid-Atlantic and north east(except NY).
 

Nate'sKit

Senior Member
OMG! The primary basis of Salsa is Cuban Son. Many other influences over the years came together generally in the US, and (once again generally) NY,NY would have been the focal point where the term and the music Salsa originated around the late 60s - early 70s.

^Quick and dirty that.

Around here, for a good while, the local Salsa bands were throwing in more styles from other Latin American countries. Such as Merengue, Cumbia, Bachata, stuff like that too keep the crowds happy. The number of Salsa bands here has been declining for a good while so I wouldn't say that it's increasing in popularity. Yeah I know, Its the rust belt, but there used to be a pretty happening scene here in the 90s.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
OMG! The primary basis of Salsa is Cuban Son. Many other influences over the years came together generally in the US, and (once again generally) NY,NY would have been the focal point where the term and the music Salsa originated around the late 60s - early 70s.

^Quick and dirty that.

Around here, for a good while, the local Salsa bands were throwing in more styles from other Latin American countries. Such as Merengue, Cumbia, Bachata, stuff like that too keep the crowds happy. The number of Salsa bands here has been declining for a good while so I wouldn't say that it's increasing in popularity. Yeah I know, Its the rust belt, but there used to be a pretty happening scene here in the 90s.
Yeah, it's dance driven, and dancers usually like to have a couple of different styles. The ladies get tired of the under arm turn in Salsa.
 

Nate'sKit

Senior Member
Yeah, it's dance driven, and dancers usually like to have a couple of different styles. The ladies get tired of the under arm turn in Salsa.
Back when merengue was the call all of the salseros said it was because they didn't know how to dance salsa. ;-)
 

tcspears

Gold Member
We had this discussion in another thread
Sorry, didn't remember that we had talked about it before!

We had this discussion in another thread, but NY was where the term was coined, for music that immigrants were playing, so I can't really credit NY for salsa.
Slight variation, but Salsa really did come together in NYC, and is really a fusion of several types of Latin music from Cuba,with some other influences.

- Son Montuno from Cuba (Fusion of Spanish melody/harmony, with African rhythms)
- Guaracha from Cuba
- Cha Cha Cha from Cuba
- Mambo from Cuba
- Bolero from Spain/Cuba
- Bomba from Puerto Rico
- Plena from Puerto Rico
- and Latin Jazz from the US

Salsa is not music that was found outside of the US, but rather developed as a fusion of Latin style made into dance music. It started in NYC in the early 1960s as Puerto Rican and Cuban immigrants were fusing their styles with American Jazz and American Latin Jazz. While the Son Montuno is at the heart of Salsa, it's really the fusion of other Puerto Rican and American styles of music that made it into Salsa.

Eventually in the 1960s, when Salsa became extremely popular in the US, it started to spread to South America, to places like Colombia.

I will grant you that many of the big players of Cuban Music from the 1930s to the 1960s felt that Salsa was not a legitimate genre, eventually they all shifted to that style, as that's where the albums were selling.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
I can't speak to the history of Salsa at all, but I can tell you it isn't very popular in the inland northwest. I can't think of a single club in my area except for a multicultural center in Spokane, though there are a couple of clubs down in Boise.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
I can't speak to the history of Salsa at all, but I can tell you it isn't very popular in the inland northwest. I can't think of a single club in my area except for a multicultural center in Spokane, though there are a couple of clubs down in Boise.
Oh, eh what is popular their, and why would anyone care, anyone with any talent already left town, and went somewhere where the locals are you know. Nice!
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
Oh, eh what is popular their, and why would anyone care, anyone with any talent already left town, and went somewhere where the locals are you know. Nice!
I am not even sure what you said there. It sounds vaguely insulting, but your use of the language leaves that in doubt. Luckily the locals, even the talented ones, don't give a rip.
 
Last edited:

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Country and Southern rock are alive and well in our area, but bluegrass rules the roost around here.

Location: mountains and foothills of North Carolina.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I read a few years ago that country is still selling well; however, folks that buy country music are STILL buying physical copies of albums as opposed to downloading.

 
Top