newbie in a band

howidied

Member
Hey im a newbie in playing in a band and also to playing lol. been playing for 6 months so far. ive got some decent first steps with my teacher but the more I play the more I learn I need to know lol :D well the problem is I used to play to a lot mp3s and there was no problem during that playing, especially when I had tabs in front of me. But things change when I play with a band. they had some songs done previously and I just came and started playing whatever came in mind. the only problem is when we play I got problems like really know when which part comes and when to make a drum fill or so. like the chorus ends and there comes the bridge but I still got problems when the chorus ends. got any tips on how to improve my band playing? thanks very much.
 

SgtThump

Platinum Member
Honestly? Listening to the songs over and over and over and becoming VERY familiar with them is your best bet. Make a CD and just listen to it constantly. That way you know when the parts change.

You can also make cheat notes, but I like learning them myself.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
We recently had a thread on this topic:

http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=91388

However, it sounds like there's some more basic stuff that you might want to get comfortable with, and that's just song structure in general. We hear music all the time, with verses, choruses, soloing, etc. But do we listen to it?

Many genres of music have their tropes, structures that don't change much from song to song. You may have heard the phrase "12-bar blues" before. That refers to a very basic blues song structure that is recognizable and predictable, and exists in hundreds of songs.

In rock music, some of the most recognizable tropes or "standard structures" are:
- verse-chorus-verse.
- soft verse, loud chorus (popularized by many, perfected by Nirvana).
- call and response (vocalist sings a line, the guitarist does a quick solo or lick that takes the same amount of time as the vocalist's line).
- parts of a song lasting four, eight, or 16 measures.

I can't stress this next part enough - don't learn a drum part. Learn the song. Not that you have to learn to play every part (guitar, bass, keys, etc.) or sing the lyrics yourself - but you should know them and recognize them as they happen, and take your cues from them. You don't drive to the store by stepping on the gas and watching a stopwatch to see when you should turn the wheel or hit the brakes. You look around you, recognize landmarks, street signs, etc. and react to other things happening on the road. The same thing happens as you play music.

Once you become conversant with the things that constantly happen in a certain style of music, a few things happen.
- You can start to anticipate what comes next in a song - because it makes sense (or just feels right).
- You will feel where the push and pull points of a song are that make sense for fills, cymbal crashes, etc.
- You begin to build dynamics into your performance (you know when to play more softly or loudly).
- You begin to play to complement things that the other bandmembers do in the song. (In one recent band I played in, on a certain song the singer sings a line about "hear the pistol crack". After he sings that line, I always smack a small china - the "pistol crack" he just sang about.)

Hope all this makes sense! Good luck, have fun!
 

fixxxer

Senior Member
When learning a new song just stick with getting the basic beat of the song down. Once that is steady, incorporate the appropriate fills for the song. As Alparrott said, knowing the song structure will help with this and let you know when the song needs to change gears.
Of course, listening to the song over and over helps as well, but you still need to understand what structure the song is using.
Once you have played with a group (or band) for awhile, you'll get to a point where you can read each other (musically) and this process becomes easier. Having a teacher is great, but playing with other people will really speed up your learning. Just be patient and remember to have fun!
 

SOTRdrummer

Junior Member
When learning a new song just stick with getting the basic beat of the song down. Once that is steady, incorporate the appropriate fills for the song. As Alparrott said, knowing the song structure will help with this and let you know when the song needs to change gears.
Of course, listening to the song over and over helps as well, but you still need to understand what structure the song is using.
Once you have played with a group (or band) for awhile, you'll get to a point where you can read each other (musically) and this process becomes easier. Having a teacher is great, but playing with other people will really speed up your learning. Just be patient and remember to have fun!
I couldn't agree with this statement more.

Hope everything works out for you!
 
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