Newbe To The Paradiddle

double bass man

Junior Member
I am working on the paradiddle. Slowly getting there. Three questions:

a) Playing the paradiddle slowly I can repeat the pattern OK. When I up the tempo on the paraddile I can play it a few times OK--then I lose it. I still keep playing at the increased tempo--keeping time--and then I can drop back into the paradiddle again. Then lose it again. Is that normal?
b) I will practice the paradiddle approx. 1/2 an hour each day--how long did it take you to play a continuous paradiddle without losing it?
c) Am I correct in thinking that the best way to progress on to the more advanced paradiddle is not to move on before I can play the basic paradiddle--in my sleep?

Advice most welcome. Thanks.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
a) Yes. Practice it at speeds where you don't "lose it" and get sloppy and uncontrolled. Now that doesn't mean that you don't ever push yourself and progress. But if you find you're falling apart more often than not, hold it back and aim for precision and accuracy before attempting all out speed.

b) How long is a piece of string? As with anything, some people get this stuff down in a matter of weeks. For some it takes months. And for others it can take years. All you can aim for, is to be better tomorrow than you were today.
Keep playing. Keep improving. And keep pushing to better yourself.

c) Yes......and no. There is no doubt that "pushing yourself" onto harder things, will help affirm the easier things you're developing, in some way. But it's also likely that if you try to run before you can crawl, then you'll fall over as well.
Aim to find the balance between allowing yourself enough time to develop proficiency with a task, but also allowing yourself to push out of your comfort zone without becoming complacent.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
How are your doubles? If they are sloppy, your paradiddles will be also. For me as the doubles got better, so did the paradiddles. You can also break it down to the hands, do R RR or L LL repeatedly until each side is comfortable then put them together.
 

benthedrum

Senior Member
One thing that I do to work on basic rudiments is to use the tempo trainer on your metronome.

I set it to start at 40bpm then I increase the speed by 1bpm each beat up to 130bpm then it slows down back to 40bpm.

Then I repeat leading with my left hand.......it's a great warm up do do before I practice.

I do that with my singles, doubles, parradiddles and triplets.
 

Ronzo

Junior Member
One thing that I do to work on basic rudiments is to use the tempo trainer on your metronome.

I set it to start at 40bpm then I increase the speed by 1bpm each beat up to 130bpm then it slows down back to 40bpm.

Then I repeat leading with my left hand.......it's a great warm up do do before I practice.

I do that with my singles, doubles, parradiddles and triplets.
What Metronome do you use that has the tempo trainer?
Does it adjust the bpm automatically?
 

benthedrum

Senior Member
What Metronome do you use that has the tempo trainer?
Does it adjust the bpm automatically?
The app that I use is Metronome Beats Pro.

Yes, it does it automatically. You have a lot of custom settings with the tempo trainer.
 
Also have a look at Bill Bachman's videos on youtube - there are tutorials for the most common rudiments:
Also this:

A short exercise I like to do on the pad to get the strokes more even goes like this (it's in triplets):
RLR LRL RLR LRL singles
RRL LRR LLR RLL doubles
RRR LLL RRR LLL triples
RLR RLR LLR LRR paradiddle
LRL RLR ... again with the left hand leading

Or you could do it in sixteenths without the triple strokes:
RLRL ...
RRLL ...
RLRR ...
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Play it at a speed you can play it nonstop for 2 to 5 minutes without falling apart. Paradiddles and most rudiments are learnt from muscle memory. you have to do it for hundreds of hours to get it tight. it's not something that happens in a month. after many years I still practice rudiments and still make gains. if it is getting sloppy or you cant continue it's too fast. plain and simple.

It's too fast because of the pattern speed and muscle memory. Your brain isn't keeping up. That is trained by repetition. This is the same reasons most guys can rip doubles and singles SUPER fast as it's an easier pattern. Toss in a new rudiment you end up back to beginner speeds. Same thing with moving accents around your playing.

It will come. log your speed that you can do 2 minutes and 5 minutes without falling apart. heck I do 10 often. It might be REALLY slow. that's fine. Focus on good technique and stick height etc. once you can hit 5 minutes and it feels pretty good add 1 or 2 BPM to the metronome. even going 1 bpm a week will be 52 in a year. In the first few months you can probibly get a few bpm a week. Gains peter out once you get really fast.

It's the same as how long does it take to bench press 250 lbs. you also start with a set of say 8, and every few work outs you add a few more pounds to the bar.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
How are your doubles? If they are sloppy, your paradiddles will be also. For me as the doubles got better, so did the paradiddles. You can also break it down to the hands, do R RR or L LL repeatedly until each side is comfortable then put them together.
I was going to say something like this. My first thought is it might be a doubles issue or something even deeper, perhaps a technique issue that would affect your doubles and subsequently your p-diddles.

I always like the mantra that to get a good double stroke, practice the triple stroke.

Like a good paint job, with drumming, it's all in the prep work. Sometimes to progress, starting over...or re-learning the major deficient areas...is the best way forward. Only in music can moving backwards move you forward ha ha.

How long have you been playing?
 
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beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Well, new forum is already getting hacked/spammed. Just when I was going to make a post about how much I love it. lol.

At least we have the report button now.
 

TMe

Senior Member
Am I correct in thinking that the best way to progress on to the more advanced paradiddle is not to move on before I can play the basic paradiddle--in my sleep?
For me, the answer to that question was "No." I wasted a lot of time trying that approach.

I suggest you find a tempo where you're comfortable playing paradiddles, then start writing short phrases that sound like music to you, and that have gaps where you can rest your hands, and focus on playing them better, not faster.

At the same time, move forward with paradiddle variations and combinations, moving paradiddles around the kit, etc., while sticking to manageable tempos. If you learn a lot of stuff at slower tempos and develop control and musicality, the speed will come. If you just keep wailing away at non-stop paradiddles you'll eventually be able to play them quickly but they still won't sound like music, so what's the point?
 
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Paul_MovementDrumCo

Junior Member
A lot of great advice here.

A bit related, but I really enjoyed this video by Rob Brown. His content is all great and helpful for both beginners and experts.


And welcome to the drum community!
 
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