New here and new to "learning"

St-Onge

Junior Member
Hey my name is St-Onge (Saint- "sponge without sp..")

I'm a french canadian who first started playing drums without any idea what I was doing. No foot control and no consistency.

I then played rockband at my friends house and right off the bat, I got it. I now have a nasty footwork on my right, but nothing ever happened with the left.

I bought a Pearl world series 7 pieces drumset about 3 months ago. I have zildjian ZXT 10 splash, 14 crash, 16 crash, 18 china and 20 ride(titanium), and Sabian SBR hats, 16 crash and 18 crash/ride. Got those stupid pearl p-100 pedals tho.. Double-bass is kinda tricky.

My kit is insane, and I can do a lot of nice beats and fills. I try to play songs a lot but I feel it's going nowhere.

I'd like to learn playing the "right way".. Not just some miscellaneous beats and parts of songs. I am looking for the basics of drumming and since I'm already pretty good, I feel it is a need before it is too late.

If you can help me start again the right way, please reply and include tabs/covers/lessons that could be usefull. (freedrumlessons I've already watched)

And also anything else I could need to feel safer on my throne (metronome, good headset, how to mic drumset simply, etc)


Thanks for helping out!!!
 

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St-Onge

Junior Member
Well that wasnt the reply I was waiting for! I know a teacher would help me, but i'm more looking for exercises to improve speed and counting. I know how to count and stuff but i'm bad at it.. I just feel it I never counted and it never was a downside. All I want is to be able to play parts when asked for.
 
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moretulife

Guest
Start off with learning all the introductory rudiments, and play to a metronome. Learn proper hand technique. Like Pocket said, you will need guidance, so you should find a good teacher.
 

Witterings

Silver Member
Well that wasnt the reply I was waiting for! I know a teacher would help me, but i'm more looking for exercises to improve speed and counting. I know how to count and stuff but i'm bad at it.. I just feel it I never counted and it never was a downside. All I want is to be able to play parts when asked for.
Honestly a teacher is the best person to help you with all of this, Pocket Full wasn't being flippant with his response at all but just advising of the best way to improve. It beats working your way through books yourself and a teacher will be able to analyse your weak points and give you specific exercises to target and strengthen your weaker areas. Even if you don't have a huge amount of money and can only afford 1 lesson a month, explain that to the teacher from the start and they should be able to give you lots of things to work on in between.
If you really can't afford them Benny Grebb's the Language of drumming is worth getting hold of, it'll teach you some of the fundamentals but also Tommy Igoe's - Great Hands for a lifetime and Groove Essentials DVD's are good places to start if you really can't afford lessons.
Hope that's of some help, you've got yourself quite a nice kit there, learn to play it properly!
 
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audiotech

Guest
It's very difficult trying to delete mental and muscle memory, this is why getting the correct fundamentals is very important from the very start. You really need one on one instructions from a competent teacher. None of us here actually know what good or bad traits are already instilled in your playing techniques. Some who guess at this may just be hurting you rather than helping.

Dennis
 

groove1

Silver Member
Welcome to the wonderful world of drumming! I started playing in the 1950's and from your
photo of your kit would recommend that at the start you really focus on being able to play
very well on a "mentally scaled down version of your kit", ie, pretend you only have a snare
and a bass drum, a hi-hat and a ride cymbal, a rack tom and a floor tom (a basic 4 piece kit) (ok, maybe a crash too) and get to where you
can play all kinds of things on that setup then start adding other items (sounds) into it.

A good teacher is invaluable and will save you time in the long run.
 
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MaryO

Platinum Member
Well I'm just going to echo everyone else. Find a teacher. You'll probably be amazed at what you don't know. I know I was...lol. I, too, started on Rockband but while it's fun and may get you started, it doesn't teach a single thing about technique, etc.

For example you say you know how to count but do you really know how to properly count not only a rock beat but a blues beat, a shuffle, or other types of beats? (And you, may, I'm just using it as an example) Find a teacher and you won't be sorry :)

Oh and welcome to the forum!

Happy Drumming!
 

dmacc

Platinum Member
Well that wasnt the reply I was waiting for! I know a teacher would help me, but i'm more looking for exercises to improve speed and counting. I know how to count and stuff but i'm bad at it.. I just feel it I never counted and it never was a downside. All I want is to be able to play parts when asked for.
I share the opinion that a teacher is the best way to accommodate your needs. Playing parts when asked for requires both the control and the vocabulary to meet this requirement. A qualified teacher can help you acquire both which takes time and practice and one on one feedback.

Just my opinion.
 
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Anthony Amodeo

Guest
I share the opinion that a teacher is the best way to accommodate your needs. Playing parts when asked for requires both the control and the vocabulary to meet this requirement. A qualified teacher can help you acquire both which takes time and practice and one on one feedback.

Just my opinion.
I to share this opinion
 

St-Onge

Junior Member
Wow guys that sounds more like it! I'm happy you all have the same point of view because being alone in all this make me wonder where is it that i'm going. If you all say a teacher would be the best, I'll sure look into it (it's a drummer forum after all!!)

And to let you know about what I can do with my set, I play "The kill - 30 seconds to mars" all the way thru, "The crimson - Atreyu (up to that weird 2bl bass beat), and "Almost easy - Avenged sevenfold (almost got it pinpoint).

I play by ear a lot. I sit there and listen to the whole song, then go parts by parts, until I feel I have it all done. I can't say tho what kind of notes I can play, or on what beat since I have no metronome and I don't really know where it changes from 16th to 16th trips, or 8ths at a faster bpm I dont know anything about that pretty much..

You've all seen the kit but there are downsides to it. I can't play fast triplets on my right foot because the pedal won't respond (and trust me I tried everything, P-100 from pearl, and really wear out), and I have nothing about electronics... I can play for hours, but can't listen back at it to find bad mistakes or bad timing, and I have no metronome.

What is it a daily drummer can't play without? Metronome, mics, headphones, mixer?!
 

groove1

Silver Member
Metronome is good and also playing along with recordings (although some recordings do speed up or slow down etc). Start learning to play a long roll, the kind with 2 bounces with
each stick, slowly then fast then slow again. Get a chart of "drum rudiments" and learn some
basic things like a 5 stroke roll, 7 stroke roll, single paradiddle. These things are "the scales"
of drums and getting a skill in executing them will enable you to "get out" the things you are
thinking and want to play. There are many more rudiments you should learn to better get
around a drum set. They "free you up" to express better....and like I said before and everyone has said..do get a teacher.
 

St-Onge

Junior Member
I badly need to change my kicks tho, and since I have 2, I know it's gonna be expensive. What do you guys suggest so that it's kinda cheap but does better than P-100?? or save money for better pedals at the end of winter?
 
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