New Craviotto lug design

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
No. Its a sound and look thing.
Man you have animal print on your throne. yeah alright. I just went and played a Crav kit and then the Ludwig, honestly the Crav floor tom is lighter than the Ludwig even lighter with wood hoops, the legs are longer and flimsier on the Ludwig than the Crav. splitting hairs guys.
 
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Tommy_D

Platinum Member
Man you have animal print on your throne. yeah alright.
Yeah, I wanted something fun so I went with the Zebra print. Thats the thing. The Craviottos are a conservative look, and after decades of producing what looks like the same kit over and over again it is really looking old and dated, IMO. If you like it, thats great. Its just not for me.

If I were in the market to spend $3-4k on a 3 piece kit, I have a number of other brands who I would spend my money on first: Qdrum, Guru, Hendrix, Daville, etc.
 

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
I try not to put any kit down, they all have their functions, you seem to always have a somewhat negative view on what others see as great drums. the drum kit hasn't really changed in design that much in decades so i don't see where you are finding the great advancements in drum design. Ask Jess Birch at Maxwells what he thinks about Crav's. oh by the way Zebra print is so yesterday.
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Craviotto make excellent drums, and absolutely should be on anyone's list who values the open nature of steam bent single ply shells. They're well made too. I've never encountered a bad one, & I've tried / played quite a few. They have been exploring lower cost lines in recent years, but still (quite rightly) sticking to the foundation of their proprietary shell design. I suspect these new lugs are simply another choice / evolution, & if they achieve greater affordability, so long as there's still a choice, I don't see an issue.

The aesthetic is a very personal thing. Purely my personal view, but I do think the new lug works better as a double sided design on snares than it does as a single sided tom lug. It's obviously a higher mass design, & that requires consideration in terms of sonic as well as visual options when selecting an instrument of this type.
 

Tommy_D

Platinum Member
I try not to put any kit down, they all have their functions, you seem to always have a somewhat negative view on what others see as great drums. the drum kit hasn't really changed in design that much in decades so i don't see where you are finding the great advancements in drum design. Ask Jess Birch at Maxwells what he thinks about Crav's. oh by the way Zebra print is so yesterday.
I'm not always negative about "great drums." I'm just not of the belief that "if it costs a lot of money, it has to be amazing and I must to drool every time I see them." I'm more of a realist. I look, I touch, I play, I usually completely disassemble and rebuild, etc. so I can make an informed opinion on the set. Now, I haven't disassembled a Craviotto kit (I don't think the guys at the booth would appreciate that), but I have looked, touched and played and they just aren't really inspiring me. They aren't bad drums by any means; they just aren't for me. All I did was qualify my reasoning by stating why I don't care for them. You retorted stating, "The Crav haters all lined up. I would say it's a price point thing wouldn't you?" when in fact I never mentioned anything about price in my reasons why I don't care for them.

We are all entitled to our opinions, and neither yours or mine is right. In fact, there really is no right or wrong. Either people like them or they don't and life moves on.

And for clarification, zebra print is the future. You know it, I know it, everyone else knows it. Buy stock in zebra print, it's going places!
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
What would be ace is, if builders could make a FT bracket that adjusts to diff size FT legs. So if I forget to switch the 12mm legs out my bag for my 10's, they'll still fit the bracket.

There's a difference in sound with the heavier legs. I have to retune my GRETSCH FT when I use aluminum DW. RESOTUNE II note readings are different with both OEM 12mm and DW aluminum legs on the same drum.
 

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
I'm not always negative about "great drums." I'm just not of the belief that "if it costs a lot of money, it has to be amazing and I must to drool every time I see them." I'm more of a realist. I look, I touch, I play, I usually completely disassemble and rebuild, etc. so I can make an informed opinion on the set. Now, I haven't disassembled a Craviotto kit (I don't think the guys at the booth would appreciate that), but I have looked, touched and played and they just aren't really inspiring me. They aren't bad drums by any means; they just aren't for me. All I did was qualify my reasoning by stating why I don't care for them. You retorted stating, "The Crav haters all lined up. I would say it's a price point thing wouldn't you?" when in fact I never mentioned anything about price in my reasons why I don't care for them.

We are all entitled to our opinions, and neither yours or mine is right. In fact, there really is no right or wrong. Either people like them or they don't and life moves on.

And for clarification, zebra print is the future. You know it, I know it, everyone else knows it. Buy stock in zebra print, it's going places!
T. I truly believe that if you purchased a Crav centre stage kit with wood hoops and Earthtone heads you too would be a believer, and it would be affordable as well. Hell you could even Zeb it..
 

Tommy_D

Platinum Member
T. I truly believe that if you purchased a Crav centre stage kit with wood hoops and Earthtone heads you too would be a believer, and it would be affordable as well. Hell you could even Zeb it..
All the Crav's I have tried have been with coated single ply heads and triple flange hoops. Usually tuned in a strange "not quite jazz/not quote rock" middle tuning. They had a short note and a partially choked sound. And the looks were just like all the other Crav. kits. I think it was a steam bent maple kit this last time. These were brought out by Steve Maxwell's, so I only assume they know how to tune a Craviotto kit. It just didn't do it for me.
 

single-ply

Senior Member
All the Crav's I have tried have been with coated single ply heads and triple flange hoops. Usually tuned in a strange "not quite jazz/not quote rock" middle tuning. They had a short note and a partially choked sound. And the looks were just like all the other Crav. kits. I think it was a steam bent maple kit this last time. These were brought out by Steve Maxwell's, so I only assume they know how to tune a Craviotto kit. It just didn't do it for me.
I can see your point here. They actually have quite a tuning range without being choked, but I have some observations:

I really like how the Crav. snares are tuned on the Maxwell videos, but not the way they tune the toms, and especially hate how they tune the bass drums. It's like they are catering to a bebop audience only. The drums can do much more and I wish they would show that better. They would be smart (IMHO) to have the same set with the bebop tuning re-tuned for fusion or rock playing. Memphis drum shop videos do this a little better. They only show a rather limited scope of the capabilities of the drums and I don't know why, especially since many of the Crav. endorsers are rock or indie drummers. They sound awesome with clear G1's or G2's tuned low. I particularly like Ludwig medium coated heads on mine. I think they sound much more open and less 'plasticy' than the Remo heads.

In the same vein, Andy shows his amazing Guru drums in various settings and even some various tunings, but I wish he'd put up a video of some smaller drums in a small group jazz setting to show off higher tunings of those drums.
 

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
I can see your point here. They actually have quite a tuning range without being choked, but I have some observations:

I really like how the Crav. snares are tuned on the Maxwell videos, but not the way they tune the toms, and especially hate how they tune the bass drums. It's like they are catering to a bebop audience only. The drums can do much more and I wish they would show that better. They would be smart (IMHO) to have the same set with the bebop tuning re-tuned for fusion or rock playing. Memphis drum shop videos do this a little better. They only show a rather limited scope of the capabilities of the drums and I don't know why, especially since many of the Crav. endorsers are rock or indie drummers. They sound awesome with clear G1's or G2's tuned low. I particularly like Ludwig medium coated heads on mine. I think they sound much more open and less 'plasticy' than the Remo heads.

In the same vein, Andy shows his amazing Guru drums in various settings and even some various tunings, but I wish he'd put up a video of some smaller drums in a small group jazz setting to show off higher tunings of those drums.
Good points here, especially the Ludwig heads, i'll have to try that. Any drum kit needs time to experiment with. Giving them judgment on a passing glance is foolish to say the least. Maxwells would play to their market obviously, but he understands drums don't worry 'bout that.Crav's tuning range is more than partially choked, anyway back to the lugs. if you don't like them just pony up for COB ones. easy.
 

Skrivarna

Senior Member
I'm surprised by the absence of gasket ?
I agree, those lugs lack of class.
Yes, they doesn't match the high end drum they are intended for.

But regarding gaskets I see no reason for using them. (Except for the bright red ones that Dunnett used on one of his custom snares, those were classy.)
 
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