Need input...

atomicman

Junior Member
I'm new here, and could not find this topic when i searched, so...

Would you turn down a band you were interested in because you had to play electronic drums in practice? I have a garage to play in, but volume is an issue, so i want to buy a (good) set of electronic drums (good for recording as well). If you would play with us otherwise, would this turn you off? For live gigs, this is not an issue, obviously.

Any input is appreciated. I'm a bass player, and wanted a drummer's opinion.
 

Filacterua

Senior Member
I guess it would be an issue for me if, after all the practicing in electronic, you expected the live set to be done in live drums. Things will be off (at least, they would for me) when the transition is made - it would be too abrupt.
 

atomicman

Junior Member
Thanks.

No, I would imagine it would be up to the drummer. If the drummer wanted to stay electronic, that's fine with me.

Me buying an electroic kit has the added benefit for the drummer of not having to move his/her gear. We bass players have big rigs, but you drummers have it tough.

Adrian
 

SticksEasy

Senior Member
I've actually been considering buying an E-kit. My acoustic drums stay setup at my band's practice space so I don't have to lug them around everywhere, and my apartment isn't practical for practice. With an E-Kit volume wouldn't be a factor.

Bottom line is, no practice pad in the world has the feel of a real drum. So you should anticipate the change in feel from an E-Kit to wood shells. Practicing on an E-Kit is better than no practice at all in any dimension.

I used to swear off eletronic drums all together, but for practice I think they're extremely practical
 

JohnPloughman

Silver Member
I think this is more of a band issue than a drummer issue, if I correctly understand the original post. Over bearing sound is an issue for the band in your practice place. So, since it is a BAND issue, why are you putting it all on the back of the drummer?

A good drummer can play within the limits of proper sound level. And, so must the rest of the band. The way I see it, this is a responsibility of you all, and you all share equally in achieving a livable sound level in your practice place.

So, yea, it would be a big turn off not to be respected for my craft in the practice place. Why bother to practice if you cant really practice?

I feel I can speak with some experience in this area, the last group I played with practiced in a living room. And, we played in retirement homes. Sound level was ALWAYS an issue for everyone. It takes discipline to play in those environments with sticks, and, even with brushes. It takes just as much discipline for the guitar and bass, the keyboard, and certainly with any sound reinforcement you use.
 

atomicman

Junior Member
Point taken, and no disrespect intended. I guess I'm thinking drums because drums are the only instrument without a volume nob. I've played with plenty of drummers that can take it down, but also plenty who would not.

This is of course true of guitar players and singers as well. True story. I was playing with a group in LA. A friend came up and said during a break that we were too loud. The singer said, with a strait face, "It's not that we are too loud, its that the room is too small." Sigh....

Adrian
 
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