Name calling....

Nancy_C

Senior Member
So,

i got called a great pocket player. thats good right?
I'd rather be called "a great pocket player" than "technically proficient, but .."

It might be the best compliment one can get from fellow musicians, because it means they enjoy playing with you!
 

93civEJ1

Senior Member
it was an audience member...haha

Just a local blues jam. Think it was a guy that I saw playing saxophone and singing.

I had got done playing and had a few people ask me who I am playing with / for etc.
 

Icetech

Gold Member
Man.. best compliment i would ever want.. nothing better than a drummer that can just hang in the pocket and make it groove... awesome :)
 

tcspears

Gold Member
It depends on the gig; I know when I first went to school I started playing with a jazz ensemble, and the teacher kept yelling at me to "get out of the pocket"

Our first day of ensemble, he passed out a Cole Porter song that had been reharmed and the meter was changed to 7/4, and then just counted it off for us to play. The bass player and I were both from trad jazz/swing stuff and came up with a cool groove to get through the song, but 2 bars into the B section the teacher topped the whole band and looked at us angrily and said: "Why are you two playing the grid? This isn't middle school jazz band". It was embarrassing, but he stopped the group 3 or 4 more times to yell at us to stop playing in the pocket.

That being said, taking a blues class at the same school, years later, they had to spend the first few weeks teaching everyone how to play in the pocket, and I was already ahead of the curve lol. It was funny to see so many brilliant players and all of them struggling with trying to play time!

Anyways, that's a long winded way of saying that it could be good or bad depending on the gig!
 

93civEJ1

Senior Member
It depends on the gig; I know when I first went to school I started playing with a jazz ensemble, and the teacher kept yelling at me to "get out of the pocket"

Our first day of ensemble, he passed out a Cole Porter song that had been reharmed and the meter was changed to 7/4, and then just counted it off for us to play. The bass player and I were both from trad jazz/swing stuff and came up with a cool groove to get through the song, but 2 bars into the B section the teacher topped the whole band and looked at us angrily and said: "Why are you two playing the grid? This isn't middle school jazz band". It was embarrassing, but he stopped the group 3 or 4 more times to yell at us to stop playing in the pocket.

That being said, taking a blues class at the same school, years later, they had to spend the first few weeks teaching everyone how to play in the pocket, and I was already ahead of the curve lol. It was funny to see so many brilliant players and all of them struggling with trying to play time!

Anyways, that's a long winded way of saying that it could be good or bad depending on the gig!

lol...were you in the movie Whiplash??
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
It depends on the gig; I know when I first went to school I started playing with a jazz ensemble, and the teacher kept yelling at me to "get out of the pocket"

Our first day of ensemble, he passed out a Cole Porter song that had been reharmed and the meter was changed to 7/4, and then just counted it off for us to play. The bass player and I were both from trad jazz/swing stuff and came up with a cool groove to get through the song, but 2 bars into the B section the teacher topped the whole band and looked at us angrily and said: "Why are you two playing the grid? This isn't middle school jazz band". It was embarrassing, but he stopped the group 3 or 4 more times to yell at us to stop playing in the pocket.

That being said, taking a blues class at the same school, years later, they had to spend the first few weeks teaching everyone how to play in the pocket, and I was already ahead of the curve lol. It was funny to see so many brilliant players and all of them struggling with trying to play time!

Anyways, that's a long winded way of saying that it could be good or bad depending on the gig!
That's some really good insight right there, and a great call from the band teacher to admonish getting out of the pocket and off the grid.

But for playing blues, being called a good pocket player has got to be the highest compliment you can get.

I've seen some gritty underground rock bands where the rhythm section carved out a deep pocket when I thought the music could have benefitted from an edgier approach that did some pushing and that wasn't quite so smooth and comfortable.

Good time keeping is always good, but laying back in the pocket is more dependent on what the music is all about.
 

Lennytoons

Senior Member
That's some really good insight right there, and a great call from the band teacher to admonish getting out of the pocket and off the grid.

But for playing blues, being called a good pocket player has got to be the highest compliment you can get.

I've seen some gritty underground rock bands where the rhythm section carved out a deep pocket when I thought the music could have benefitted from an edgier approach that did some pushing and that wasn't quite so smooth and comfortable.

Good time keeping is always good, but laying back in the pocket is more dependent on what the music is all about.
Yes, being called a good pocket player is the highest compliment you can get. I play a lot of blues jams and most of the drummers are "Saturday afternoon at Guitar Center" players. They have to show you every lick they ever knew whether you want to hear it or not. I played a couple of weeks ago and one of the bar patrons came up to me very excited. He said I played "PERFECTLY!" so well done. He remarked about how I set up the song and brought it home at the end PERFECTLY! Very enthusiastic. The song was a long jam version of "The Thrill is Gone." All we did was start slow and simple and speed up near the end with a building crescendo and then back to slow...... Great jam and so nice to be appreciated for something seemingly so simple.
 

mikel

Platinum Member
A lot of Ego threads on here at the moment. I feel a trend has been started.

Are drummers on here more needy than the average, do you think?
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
If you aren't a musician, getting called a "pocket player" can be an insult, good thing we're drummers.
 

mikel

Platinum Member
Know what you mean but I always though that to be "In the pocket" the whole band had to be in it, or how could you tell?

If the bass player or the rhythm player are not in sync with the drummer then no one is in the pocket, cos there isnt one.
 
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