My drum tuning

KamaK

Platinum Member
Ennie Meenie Miney Mo
Catch a drummer by the toe
If he hollers, tune it low
Ennie Meenie Miney Mo
 
M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
Do whatever compliments the music you're playing. High energy funk might sound weird with low, tubby drums. And playing in an Eagles cover band means you leave your piccolo snare at home.

If you work constantly, you might want to carry a couple of different sets of heads so you can configure to who you're playing with. Or at least be quick about how to tune your kit.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
A more relevant question might be, "Do I post high?" lol

Good to see ya havin some fun lately, MZ. heh heh
 
T

The SunDog

Guest
Tune big drums high and small drums low! You wanna try to get every drum to sound the same.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Here is the easy way to do this.

Tune one rack tom high, and one rack tom low. Have someone else play your drums. Go out in the audience and listen to them. Then you will know.

This is what I did. The high tuning won hands down. The high tuning cut right through the loud guitars and bass.

However, if I were using then for recording purposes, I'd tune them lower.


.
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
Both. One head as high as you can crank it, the opposite head should be wrinkled. I recommend hydrolics for all resonant heads. Tried and true formula for success.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
OK Mr. Semantics.

.....................
I think he's being humorous, as MZ just posted a half dozen "Ringo, good or bad? / tuning high or low? / zildjian or sabian?" threads to get a rise out of everyone. I'm pretty sure he's kicking back watching it burn right now. I need to go buy a good cigar.

I heard that tensioning to a true fundamental pitch has been around since the days of the "Tsun Ying" dynasty. ;-)
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
Here is the easy way to do this.

Tune one rack tom high, and one rack tom low. Have someone else play your drums. Go out in the audience and listen to them. Then you will know.

This is what I did. The high tuning won hands down. The high tuning cut right through the loud guitars and bass.

However, if I were using then for recording purposes, I'd tune them lower.


This is called 'tuning to the room' smart drummers do this.


Some drummers technique decides their tuning, they may be more comfortable with tight heads and a said about of rebound, or loose heads and the same. One approach is tune the top head to where it feels good/best to play, then tune the bottom heads to get the best sound for those mechanics.

Since sound is said to be subjective, why would you sacrifice playability (limiting your abilities) for aural satisfaction?
 

Beam Me Up Scotty

Silver Member
Tune? I just put the heads on finger-tight! So much easier than taking the time to learn the ins and outs my instrument! Plus, it gives me a deep, thuddy sound that all the pros want. Of course, it's only when I add a pack of moongels to each drum that their gorgeous tone really comes through! I saw Joey Jordison do it, and he's the best drummer, so obviously this is the way to go.
 

Jankowske

Senior Member
If you tune high, then overtones. But if you tune low, then undertones. Scientists no have found middle ground yet.

Best to do is tune cymbals instead.
 
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