Multiple outputs

manther

Junior Member
I've recently been spending more and more time doing remote collabs. One of the people I just provided a drum track to asked me for "stems", meaning output files for each of the significant pieces of my kit that all line up when dropped into a DAW, (kick, snare, toms, cymbals). I'm using a Roland TD-15kv for my remote collab stuff, but I'll be mic'ing my acoustic kit soon too. I did some research and the TD-15kv is pretty much limited to outputting two channels, unless you wanna do this trick: http://www.rolandus.com/support/knowledge_base/206332735 Which I would assume leads to the drummer recording a single beat up to 4 times to get all the pieces separately tracked. Also I'm looking at mixers for when I do mic my acoustic kit, and at least the first couple I've looked also output to two channels. So... is this guy that asked for this off-base in his request? (I'm sure he wants to adjust levels/compression/clipping etc). Am I missing an easy way to give him what he wants?

Thanks in advance.
 
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Matt Bo Eder

Guest
Regarding your acoustic kit, the easiest way to do it is with an 8-channel USB audio interface into your computer. Then you have up to 8 different instruments recorded on their on tracks and then you can give the other person separate tracks.

Likewise, if you already have an8-track recorder of some kind, you would need a mixer with at least 8 sub-outputs which are usually summed to the stereo outputs on the mixer, which you wouldn't use in this case. Each sub gets recorded to its own track and those are what the other person gets. For example, the Mackie 1604 VLZ has 8 direct outs for the first 8 channels which output each of those channels seperately post-fader and are not affected by the routing buss on he console.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
Without multiple, individual outs, midi is your friend.

Record as midi, and each piece will have its own number.

Depending on what software you're using, you can separate them out to their own tracks.
 

manther

Junior Member
Without multiple, individual outs, midi is your friend.

Record as midi, and each piece will have its own number.

Depending on what software you're using, you can separate them out to their own tracks.
OK in GB I did try recording as midi yesterday and it did look like it might be helpful for this situation. It sounded a little wierd, but i'm sure I need to mess around with which kit I apply to the trak(s). Thanks
 

manther

Junior Member
Regarding your acoustic kit, the easiest way to do it is with an 8-channel USB audio interface into your computer. Then you have up to 8 different instruments recorded on their on tracks and then you can give the other person separate tracks.

Likewise, if you already have an8-track recorder of some kind, you would need a mixer with at least 8 sub-outputs which are usually summed to the stereo outputs on the mixer, which you wouldn't use in this case. Each sub gets recorded to its own track and those are what the other person gets. For example, the Mackie 1604 VLZ has 8 direct outs for the first 8 channels which output each of those channels seperately post-fader and are not affected by the routing buss on he console.

I like the Audio interface idea, damn if I didn't *just* but a two channel focusrite like a month ago. That Mackie is nice looking but pretty rich for me. Thank you.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
For the eKit, you can record MIDI and sign any instrument you want to any note. You can also record the analog out of the eKit simultaneously.

The beauty of midi is that, once you've recorded the notes, you can change the instrument at your leisure.

For the aKit... If the Mackie gear is too rich, look at the Zoom R16.
 

WalterKohn

Senior Member
Check out Cubase and Superior Drummer. That is what I use for multi-track drum stuff. Sounds super good and just like a real kit. Dynamics will be wayyyy better than stock Roland sounds.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
I like the Audio interface idea, damn if I didn't *just* but a two channel focusrite like a month ago. That Mackie is nice looking but pretty rich for me. Thank you.
An 8 channel interface or stand alone recorder would only work how you want if you have 8 audio
outs on your module, or if you want to try and manage playing the exact same thing 4 times in a row.

Reason being - your module only has 2 audio outs.

I'm assuming all your sounds have to go to one of the outs, or be panned somewhere in between.
What you're trying to do is to get each sound on its own track.
After that's done, you can start to manipulate the data.

Midi side steps that problem nicely.
 

manther

Junior Member
An 8 channel interface or stand alone recorder would only work how you want if you have 8 audio
outs on your module, or if you want to try and manage playing the exact same thing 4 times in a row.

Reason being - your module only has 2 audio outs.

I'm assuming all your sounds have to go to one of the outs, or be panned somewhere in between.
What you're trying to do is to get each sound on its own track.
After that's done, you can start to manipulate the data.

Midi side steps that problem nicely.
For the audio interface talk I was responding to Matt about referring to when I get ready to mic my acoustic kit. But I'm definitely going to try going down the midi route for the Roland.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
For the audio interface talk I was responding to Matt about referring to when I get ready to mic my acoustic kit. But I'm definitely going to try going down the midi route for the Roland.
OK - I missed the acoustic kit part.
Those would work for that.
 

manther

Junior Member
I think I've opened a huge can of worms. I bought two mics thinking I'd be able to start recording with my acoustic kit and slowly add mics as I get more spending cash. Boy was I wrong. They sound terrible. I have a ton to learn about mic placement and mixing and mastering.

I got a shure sm94 and put it about 3 feet over the center of my kit. I got a sennheiser e602 ii and put it about an inch in front of my kick. (no port yet). Messed with the gain on my focusrite to keep it just before clipping. Turned phantom power on. Recorded in GB and Ableton. In garage band I messed around with compression and eq. The sm94 sounded OK. The snare sounded meh though (anemic), and the 602 was barely audible. Switched to Ableton and they both sounded way better the 602 actually had some low end. But over all still sounded like butt. I think I've got a long way to go and a lot to learn. Plus I just need more mics. I got enough right now to probably buy two more mics. What next two mics do yall think I should get? I got a 24" kick, 13 Tom, 16 Tom, and a 14 blackrolite.
 
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Matt Bo Eder

Guest
I think I've opened a huge can of worms. I bought two mics thinking I'd be able to start recording with my acoustic kit and slowly add mics as I get more spending cash. Boy was I wrong. They sound terrible. I have a ton to learn about mic placement and mixing and mastering.

I got a shure sm94 and put it about 3 feet over the center of my kit. I got a sennheiser e602 ii and put it about an inch in front of my kick. (no port yet). Messed with the gain on my focusrite to keep it just before clipping. Turned phantom power on. Recorded in GB and Ableton. In garage band I messed around with compression and eq. The sm94 sounded OK. The snare sounded meh though (anemic), and the 602 was barely audible. Switched to Ableton and they both sounded way better the 602 actually had some low end. But over all still sounded like butt. I think I've got a long way to go and a lot to learn. Plus I just need more mics. I got enough right now to probably buy two more mics. What next two mics do yall think I should get? I got a 24" kick, 13 Tom, 16 Tom, and a 14 blackrolite.
Wait a minute - adding more mics to a beginner is like a beginning photographer buying more lenses before he knows what to do with the ones he's got. Do not buy more mics yet.

In a perfect world, you should be able to place your overhead and bass drum mics just like you did and get a good sound. I do it all the time. So you really need to experiment with what you have. Don't mess with any settings in Garageband, leave all of those settings flat. Place the mics, record something. If it doesn't sound right, get up and try the mics in another position. If that doesn't work, get up and place the mics in another position, etc.,.... That's how you learn to get a good sound.

If you've seen my overhead drum solo video, that was just the two mics on the Zoom Q8 camera (at first), and that sounded pretty good. Maybe the mics aren't lying and your kit sounds pretty bad? That's always a possibility too.

Get back in there with those two mics and practice practice practice!
 

manther

Junior Member
Didn't take long to find something pretty good sounding. This position right here with the sm94 in the center of the kit aimed just over the edge of the snare, the 602 really close to the kick and slightly angled made a pretty nice recording. Didn't touch the tom or kick tuning, I already really liked their sound, but I did change the snare tuning. Tuned the resonate side up quite a bit, and came down on the top side. Ended up pretty happy with that. The only thing that I could improve is the toms. They come in loud and clear and all, just not with the authority that I think they could.

Thanks for the tips.

PS btw both these mics are pretty awesome, enjoying them quite a bit now.

 
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