Moeller and Chapin

Styx

Senior Member
In Jim's video, Speed and Endurance, there is a section where he talks about Sanford and the few lessons he had with him. Jim says that Sanford put him through the ringer and that he came out the otherside a better player.

I was wondering, and hopefully some of you will have some ideas, what do you think Sanford asked him to do during that time with him? What exactly do you guys and gals think he did or the process Sanford asked him to follow during that period he refers to as the ringer???
 

Deltadrummer

Platinum Member
Any insight I could try to offer would be conjecture and conjecture only. I would suppose that what Moeller taught Jim was how to generate the rudiments using the whip technique, and understanding the role of natural movement in sound reproduction and stick control. As in the video when Jim talks about being all stiff and uncoordinated, and Moeller put the kibosh on that.
 

donv

Silver Member
DeltaDrummer is right on about conjecture, but remember that Moeller was about a lot more then the Moeller Method or Technique that has been attached to him by others. Moeller also was a proponent of the matched grip and finger technique. In fact, I can't find any discussion on the finger technique for drums that pre-dates Moeller. He also was fond of saying, "Do what's right for the situation." Unfortunately because others have labeled him with, "Moeller Technique," much of what he was about has been obscured in discussions about him. The idea of "Moeller Killer," is a good example of this.

Here's a paragraph from Hansen's writings on Moeller--grasp what's underlined:

What aspects of Moeller should I use, or learn to do, in order to improve on how I play my drum kit ? Ask these basic questions as you continue along reading.

Consider these points ...

Take on the task of working out regularly with rudiments

Experiment with the fulcrum ideas in Moeller's book for gripping the drumstick

Read the book for yourself ... many have gotten it wrong !

Master all 'Moeller techniques', such as, the UP STROKE etc.

Realize that a rhythmic movement, beginning from some part of the body, initiates an action, that eventually causes the drumstick (as Moeller saw it), to strike the playing surface. "The scholarly drummer is a student of eurhythmics" (page 69 in Moeller's book).


Check this out for the history of and consequent study of eurhythmics. Moeller was a strong proponent of Dalcroze's ideas and concepts.

http://www.dance-to-health-help-your-special-needs-child.com/eurhythmics.html
 
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Deltadrummer

Platinum Member
I had actually planned on going to see Jim over the last few years to ask him this question. When I moved back to NY from Cali, he was already retired in FL and I never got to go visit him, even though I knew my opportunity was fleeting as the days went by.

People were always fond of saying that nobody wanted to play with Jim because he was just so good. It's a way of dealing with their own insecurities. It is such a shame that that kind of virtuosity is something that is so looked down upon. It's so easy to take a pop at Tommy Lang or Marco Minnemann. But remember that when Advanced Techniques came out, nobody could play that book. People thought it impossible to play and now today it is not really that hard. It is a mere introduction to some of the more advanced work that people are doing. I am not going to argue that one should spend all their time going through Chapin, Chester, Minnmenann or that El Negro book, and not be able to lay down a hot samba or mambo. But Jim totally revolutionized drumming, and maybe people couldn't hang with him; but it was because he was ahead of his time.
 

donv

Silver Member
I had actually planned on going to see Jim over the last few years to ask him this question. When I moved back to NY from Cali, he was already retired in FL and I never got to go visit him, even though I knew my opportunity was fleeting as the days went by.

People were always fond of saying that nobody wanted to play with Jim because he was just so good. It's a way of dealing with their own insecurities. It is such a shame that that kind of virtuosity is something that is so looked down upon. It's so easy to take a pop at Tommy Lang or Marco Minnemann. But remember that when Advanced Techniques came out, nobody could play that book. People thought it impossible to play and now today it is not really that hard. It is a mere introduction to some of the more advanced work that people are doing. I am not going to argue that one should spend all their time going through Chapin, Chester, Minnmenann or that El Negro book, and not be able to lay down a hot samba or mambo. But Jim totally revolutionized drumming, and maybe people couldn't hang with him; but it was because he was ahead of his time.
Wow Ken, it must have been nice to "go visit," Chapin. There's no doubt the man started it all by showing and bringing the possibilities to the masses. Before he made it accessable, it was all voodoo except to a select few.
 
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