Mixing drums :)

Zoofie

Senior Member
Hey all
I recently got my recording stuff with is a mixing desk (not multitrack) , 4 mics (2 overheads , 1 kick and one snare) , stands , leads , software etc etc.
Now im happy with the sound im getting from snare and overheads , but kick im not that happy with yet. Its quite a cardboard like sound atm with not much depth. Any tricks , tips on how to make it sound 'fatter'?
I cant add compression to the kick individually as its only a usb mixer.
Btw if anyone has any good sites that help me with recording , please share! :)
Thanks!
Zoof
 
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trkdrmr

Guest
First: what kick mic are you using? Where is the mic itself? what kick drum is it with what heads?

Those are a lot of variables right there.
 

Zoofie

Senior Member
Its a superlux mic , its not a well known make. Its nothing too pro , because im only doing fun home recordings atm. I have alot of padding inside the bass drum and the mic is right next to the batter head facing the beaters. Should i be having the lows on the mixer right the way up and the hi's and mids right the way down? And what about frequency?
Thanks again :)
 
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trkdrmr

Guest
Its a superlux mic , its not a well known make. Its nothing too pro , because im only doing fun home recordings atm. I have alot of padding inside the bass drum and the mic is right next to the batter head facing the beaters. Should i be having the lows on the mixer right the way up and the hi's and mids right the way down? And what about frequency?
Thanks again :)
Usually they would cut everything from 400hz and up. The problem is, your kick mic could have rotten low end. It could have a cutoff of 80hz or worse.

Boosting the lows might help, maybe in the 60hz range. Lower than that, you mic might not even register it.

having the mic on the resonant head side with give you more low and less attack.
 

Zoofie

Senior Member
Thanks alot trkdrmr!!! Cleared quite abit up.
I have another few queries about the mixer itself though , with the EQ a bit.
For example , next to the lows knob control it says "80HZ" and on either side of the knob it says "-15" and "+15". What does all this mean?
Thanks again :)
 
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trkdrmr

Guest
Thanks alot trkdrmr!!! Cleared quite abit up.
I have another few queries about the mixer itself though , with the EQ a bit.
For example , next to the lows knob control it says "80HZ" and on either side of the knob it says "-15" and "+15". What does all this mean?
Thanks again :)
+15 decibels usually. 80hz is the center frequency of the boost or cut. 80hz is midbass, so boosting it might help. Try +6db at first, don't go nuts just yet.
 
Thanks alot trkdrmr!!! Cleared quite abit up.
I have another few queries about the mixer itself though , with the EQ a bit.
For example , next to the lows knob control it says "80HZ" and on either side of the knob it says "-15" and "+15". What does all this mean?
Thanks again :)
That particular EQ control will boost or cut 15dB with its center frequency at 80HZ, which is very very low.

I do a good amount of mixing and recording, and my personal kick drum recipe is a 3-5db boost at around 100 HZ (or 80, since that is what is available to you), a 3-5dB boost at 5kHz, and cut out almost everything between 300 and 400HZ (thats the crappy cardboard sound you're hearing).

Not by any means an instant fix, but this EQ is a more or less industry standard place to start from. A mild compression of the whole drum mix will help your sound a bit too. Nothing crazy, start with 3:1 and go from there.
 
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trkdrmr

Guest
I do a good amount of mixing and recording, and my personal kick drum recipe is a 3-5db boost at around 100 HZ (or 80, since that is what is available to you), a 3-5dB boost at 5kHz, and cut out almost everything between 300 and 400HZ (thats the crappy cardboard sound you're hearing).
I am going to set up garage band that way. The huge variable here is I have an audix d6, which is a decent kick mic, and I have no idea what his mic can /can't do.
 

Zoofie

Senior Member
I do a good amount of mixing and recording, and my personal kick drum recipe is a 3-5db boost at around 100 HZ (or 80, since that is what is available to you), a 3-5dB boost at 5kHz, and cut out almost everything between 300 and 400HZ (thats the crappy cardboard sound you're hearing).
Sorry to be a pain mate , but what do you mean by 300 and 400HZ. Is that highs or mids?
And by 'cut out' do you mean have at "0" , or have at "-15"?
Thanks again!
Sorry to be a noob , but you've got to learn somewhere i guess :)
 
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trkdrmr

Guest
Sorry to be a pain mate , but what do you mean by 300 and 400HZ. Is that highs or mids?
And by 'cut out' do you mean have at "0" , or have at "-15"?
Thanks again!
Sorry to be a noob , but you've got to learn somewhere i guess :)
300/400hz is in the midrange. It corresponds to the plasticky slap frequencies you get from a kick.

"0" means the control is level, not boosted or cut. You need to move the slider all the way down (-15db) to eliminate those frequencies AKA "Cut." CUT= any setting below "0"
 

Zoofie

Senior Member
Awesome thanks mate! You've cleared up alot very quickly :)
Cheers buddy

P.S Would you have the highs level? Or cut aswell?
 
I would cut the way-high stuff. Cut out anything above 10k, because there's really nothing useful up there for your kick drum sound anyway. That'll help to minimize any bleed-through of cymbals, snare, and hi-hats as well.

Just google it, you'll find literally thousands of very helpful articles and websites devoted to every aspect of recording any instrument in the world.
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
This is a USB mixer, you say? If that it the case I would imagine you can record each mic to a seperate track. That may be what you're doing already. In that case, what are you recording to? I would be inclined to use software to apply EQ afterwards rather than recording it with EQ on, as it sounds like those EQs are not going to be of much use in getting a good sound.
 
M

Mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
I would cut the way-high stuff. Cut out anything above 10k, because there's really nothing useful up there for your kick drum sound anyway. That'll help to minimize any bleed-through of cymbals, snare, and hi-hats as well.

Just google it, you'll find literally thousands of very helpful articles and websites devoted to every aspect of recording any instrument in the world.
I like a bit of top in everything, personally. But then again I tend to use very minimal instrumentation. I think this attitude of 'kill everything above 10K' takes away a lot of the finer detail of our listening experience. If you listen to something like 'OK Computer' listen to where all the action is happening that spaces the album out. It's all above 10K. Genius.
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
Yes, it's only in extreme circumstances that it needs trimming a bit.

And hello MFB, I was wondering when you'd appear on this thread!
 
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