Mike Mangini" Drum

Ekim

Silver Member
Mike Mangini was playing huge kits long before DT.

The constant bashing of big kits is annoying if not downright pathetic.

Why not bash bass players for straying off of the root note while you're at it?
 

daredrummer

Gold Member
Agree with others, it is pretty over the top. But hey, it's progressive rock/metal. It's based on unique sounds. All the prog rockers can have their speicalties: Neil with his electronic/acoustic hybrid, gavin with his mini bells, bozzio with his toms, and mike with his mega kit.

Besides, you could put Buddy on that monster or Mangini on a 4 piece, and they'd still would be the same drummer.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Man....serious case of deja vu here. I swear I've been through all this bullshit on the "Big kits/Small kits" thread.....isn't once round that lonely mountain enough?

I don't care if it's Sticks4's Peart-worshiping monster kit, Andy's "stave-snob" concept kit, DMC's cocktail kit or Pollyanna's djembe........for the love of christ......just go and play yer friggen' drums......and let Mangini play his!! :)
 

aydee

Platinum Member
Well that is the obvious reason, but thanks for bringing it up. :)
I like you too, S4Ds. Despite the Peart thing : )


I don't care if it's Sticks4's Peart-worshiping monster kit, Andy's "stave-snob" concept kit, DMC's cocktail kit or Pollyanna's djembe........for the love of christ......just go and play yer friggen' drums......and let Mangini play his!! :)
Now thats obvious! PFG how's the Barcelona itch holding up? On your return and want a rococco finish on your kit, I guarantee.

...
 
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Jeff Almeyda

Senior Consultant
It's actually much smaller than Portnoy's monster kits. If you remember, Portnoy's kit was actually several kits in one.

The fact that Mangini can play full lefty enabled him to access the same sounds without having to get up and move to another drum throne.

If you think the band would allow anything less in terms of drumkit size then you just don't get where the band is coming from.

Lastly, no you couldn't do the gig on a 4 piece. Those sounds are part of the "Dream Theater" experience and their true fans would not get to hear the song the way they remember it. Saying, "It's the same rhythms, just transposed onto fewer drums" doesn't cut it. So now relative pitches and timbre mean nothing?
 

Mark_S

Silver Member
...
Lastly, no you couldn't do the gig on a 4 piece. Those sounds are part of the "Dream Theater" experience and their true fans would not get to hear the song the way they remember it. Saying, "It's the same rhythms, just transposed onto fewer drums" doesn't cut it. So now relative pitches and timbre mean nothing?
+1

Drumming and music is an art at the end of the day, and who's to say another artist is wrong in their expression? It's a bit like a painter saying Van Gogh should of used less colours to express his art.

I personally have always liked hearing the different sounds as well as the different rhythms. Hell, you could play an infinite number of rhythms on just a snare drum, but not having the contrasting sound of a bass drum wouldn't exactly cut it in most situations.
 

AJ3000

Silver Member
It's actually much smaller than Portnoy's monster kits. If you remember, Portnoy's kit was actually several kits in one.

The fact that Mangini can play full lefty enabled him to access the same sounds without having to get up and move to another drum throne.

If you think the band would allow anything less in terms of drumkit size then you just don't get where the band is coming from.

Lastly, no you couldn't do the gig on a 4 piece. Those sounds are part of the "Dream Theater" experience and their true fans would not get to hear the song the way they remember it. Saying, "It's the same rhythms, just transposed onto fewer drums" doesn't cut it. So now relative pitches and timbre mean nothing?
I wouldn't consider playing with DT on a 4pc kit in any way shape or form, and I do love a big kit (currently gig between 7 and 9 drums depending on my mood....)

However, going out with a pubs and clubs covers band and making a good interpretative job on a 4pc does pull in some cool points for me... It's cool to see that the song can still sound good without half of pearl's assembly line taking over the fox and hounds bar in a small village!
 

mattsmith

Platinum Member
It's actually much smaller than Portnoy's monster kits. If you remember, Portnoy's kit was actually several kits in one.

The fact that Mangini can play full lefty enabled him to access the same sounds without having to get up and move to another drum throne.

If you think the band would allow anything less in terms of drumkit size then you just don't get where the band is coming from.

Lastly, no you couldn't do the gig on a 4 piece. Those sounds are part of the "Dream Theater" experience and their true fans would not get to hear the song the way they remember it. Saying, "It's the same rhythms, just transposed onto fewer drums" doesn't cut it. So now relative pitches and timbre mean nothing?
I'm with Jeff on this. Big kits are a DT trademark...so in this case size does matter, while the relative pitches accorded a DT styled kit can't be made with less tension and a firmly placed elbow. It's just a different kind of gig.

But theoretically, no one think for a moment that Mangini couldn't play 75% of that gig on any size kit he chose. For my money that guy is the most technically gifted and intellectually complete drummer alive today. Now his musical choices are not entirely my own...but credit where credit's due. A few months back when I was reading some of the Mangini technical critiques from that audition drama cycle, I just couldn't stop laughing. I mean this guy must be the most underrated drummer to have ever lived to have so many continuing to second guess him. Sometimes the whole thing just amazes me.
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
Lastly, no you couldn't do the gig on a 4 piece. Those sounds are part of the "Dream Theater" experience and their true fans would not get to hear the song the way they remember it. Saying, "It's the same rhythms, just transposed onto fewer drums" doesn't cut it. So now relative pitches and timbre mean nothing?
Exactly. You can play most of Mozart's orchestral repetoire on two timps depending on how good you are with the pedal. Don't try to do Stravinksy's stuff that way unless you want to make a hash of it. You make the equipment fit the gig. If I get called to do a big band thing, I'll likely bring a four piece tuned high and a selection of cymbals to suit. But that won't work on the show I'm starting next week, as it's all contemporary/pop with plenty of big-dramatic-down-the-toms fills to go around. Two-ply heads and thick tuning on 5 or 6 pieces and cymbals that will cut through the mix are in order.

Brian Blade gets about as many timbres and sounds out of his small kits as I can imagine. Ditto players like Ari Hoenig and Jeff Ballard, but most of that stuff isn't going to make much of an impression in the sonic environment of a DT performance. There's a reason Mangini got the DT chair, and a reason Blade/Hoenig/Ballard get called for the gigs they do. Never the twain shall meet. Mangini's thing is big, brash and fast and his kit plays a huge role - pardon the pun - in that.

Like Matt, I'll openly say that what Mangini does is not my thing. I don't like the music he usually chooses to play and I'm not a huge fan of his sound and approach. It's entirely subjective, but it just doesn't warm my cockles. So there. But I wouldn't - even for a second - deny that the guy is a force of nature and has accomplished far more than I could hope to. And if he chooses to use the biggest kit in the world to make his sound - and he has the roadies to help him shlep it - that's his bag and he's welcome to it.
 
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8Mile

Platinum Member
I dig the placement of the Octabons. Reminds me of one of my favorite drumming visuals, which is when Virgil Donati somehow includes those two toms that are mounted like 3 feet above his head in a fast roll around the kit without any apparent difficulty.
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
I think JoJo could go out there with a tambourine and cover that DT gig solid. In fact, he could probably cover all you alls gigs at the same time just doing that wrist-together hand clapping thing.

j/k, happy Friday drum friends. :)
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
For anyone who might be interested:

Mike has a series of interviews where he goes over his kit in detail:

Part one: bass drum and hit hat pedals:
http://www.metalsucks.net/2011/09/15/rigged-dream-theaters-mike-mangini-takes-you-through-every-piece-of-his-mega-drumkit-part-1/

Part two: cymbals and toms:
http://www.metalsucks.net/2011/09/15/rigged-dream-theaters-mike-mangini-takes-you-through-every-piece-of-his-mega-drumkit-part-1/

part three hasn't been released yet.

He also address Larry's comments about why he didn't choose a smaller kit for the gig. LOL.
 
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