Mid Life reflections and Musings

shadowtick

Member
I have recently started playing again after a 25 year hiatus, and I am finding that with dedicated daily practice, things are coming back much quicker than i thought possible. Had some friends over tonight and the conversation turned to music... Good food, some good music in the background, good friends, interesting conversation.......... a super night.

After my friends left I came to the forums and was reading some of the posts, especially those concerning music that people that people do and do not like........ This got me feeling all philosophical, and for my own benefit, I thought I would post a bit about how I felt about music when I stopped playing at 18, and how I feel about it now at the age of 43.

Here are some general observatons based solely on my own experience:

1. The music that I listened to between the ages of 10 and 16 still moves me, still has a special place in my heart, and when I hear one of those songs, it reminds me of why I wanted to play the drums in the first place. There must be something very special about those formative years

2. I now find myself willing to do something I was not willing to do when I was 18. Work mentally to try to "get" a piece of music. To illustrate when I was younger, Frank Zappa and Thelonius Monk were both completely beyond my realm lf understanding. At this point I cannot say I fully comprehend either of those artists, but my appreciation has grown greatly, and my understanding as well. I am catching nuances in phrasing, recurring themes etc that eluded me in my youth........... I am the richer for putting some dedicated listening time in and keeping an open mind.

3. I appreciate my instrument a lot more than I did when I was younger. Perhaps because a bit more of life has given me a bit more soul, but I find that I am a more emotional player now......... and am better able to express sadness, joy, or anger on my kit......

4. While I am still dazzled by the technical, (Who among us cannot watch Buddy Rich play and go OMG), I am developing a great apprecition for the subtle and dramatic.... For example John Densmores playing in "The End" really blows me away now.......... It's theatrical and moving. There is a big difference between playing simply because that's all one can play, and listening to a master like Steve Gadd playing simply.

5. My view has changed, before drumming was something that I did, now it's part of who I am........

I am so greatful to have come back to the drums........... It adds great joy to my life and I recognize now that i don't have to play like my heros do....... I have to play like myself, and be my own voice baging in the darkness
 
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BGH

Gold Member
Welcome back to the kit after all these years. It sounds like your thoughts are based on a maturing process for you, during your long break. Maybe its these new ideations that want to make you play once again. Good for you, and good luck with it.

I would say my own experience is different than yours. I believe that most drummers are born to be drummers, that you have to have a natural inclination for the instrument and an inborn natural coordination to be successful. As such, drumming has always been a part of who I am. How do I know this?

-I wanted to play the drums starting at age 6 or 7, when I saw the Beatles on TV. It was an instant attraction
-I started playing at 8 years old-as soon as I had the opportunity
-I did very well from the get-go
-I loved hanging with other drummers and trading ideas
-I'm a happy person when drumming is in my life. I've been miserable during periods of time when I couldn't play.
-Practice was never a chore for me, even as a youth. I looked forward to it, and still do.
-I played all through school including college, and started doing paid gigs as soon as I could.
-I always feel more comfortable behind the kit, than in the crowd. I'd rather play than just socialize, and my social life usually centers around my playing.

I could go on and on, but the point is: drumming has always been a part of who I am.
 

aydee

Platinum Member
I think your point # 5 says it all. This is a living, breathing organism that lives in our spirit and our souls and defines us in many ways. Even to ourselves. And sometimes it takes a lifetime to discover and acknowledge it.

Enjoy your passion and you bliss to its fullest, bud.

..
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
-I wanted to play the drums starting at age 6 or 7, when I saw the Beatles on TV. It was an instant attraction
-I started playing at 8 years old-as soon as I had the opportunity
-I did very well from the get-go
-I loved hanging with other drummers and trading ideas
-I'm a happy person when drumming is in my life. I've been miserable during periods of time when I couldn't play.
-Practice was never a chore for me, even as a youth. I looked forward to it, and still do.
-I played all through school including college, and started doing paid gigs as soon as I could.
-I always feel more comfortable behind the kit, than in the crowd. I'd rather play than just socialize, and my social life usually centers around my playing.
Wow, that's really scary - it's as if you pulled it right out of my head (except for the paid gigs part). Especially your last point. I mean, seriously, I spend far too much time on this forum.

There was a 6 year period when I was in the Navy from 17-23 when I rarely got an opportunity to play, but even then, I could tell I was a better drummer at 23 than I was at 17.
 

Concrete Pete

Senior Member
Hey Shadow,

Great post. Welcome to the "Middle Age Club"--I'm 52, and drumming and music has put me in a better place than I would have ever dared to dream in my earlier years.

Life sure is good sometimes, huh? Enjoy!

Cheers,
C. P.
 

BGH

Gold Member
Wow, that's really scary - it's as if you pulled it right out of my head (except for the paid gigs part). Especially your last point. I mean, seriously, I spend far too much time on this forum.

There was a 6 year period when I was in the Navy from 17-23 when I rarely got an opportunity to play, but even then, I could tell I was a better drummer at 23 than I was at 17.
Ha! See, its in our blood!
 

Average

Senior Member
Welcome back! Once its in you it won't leave. Best of luck on your journey and you're at the right place to learn.
 
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