Micing and Recording Tricks?

AzHeat

Platinum Member
So, I just learned how to feed the DAW back into the mix. At least I know why things sounded a bit flat and distant in some regards. Loved the tom sound. It was very close to what I hear just tapping them with no ear protection.

Feeding the DAW back through the mix and compression and EQ have a huuuuge effect...well duh, but I had no idea I wasn’t feeding the DAW back through. I was experiencing some sound shaping with the effects I’d turn on or off, so it just wasn’t that obvious. It’s obvious now. Compression woke the BD and snare up...way up! They now sound full...a bit too full, but haven’t experimented with any settings yet. Just turned stuff on and off.

Now the toms are too much and way too in your face. Compression makes it far worse! Gating sure is interesting. I like how clean the BD and snare are. It really keeps those two mics from picking up the other stuf. On toms though, there’s just nothing natural about that sound! At least not for now.

Overall I’m really glad to have picked up the recording gear, but rudiments, independence excersises, and just time on the set have given way to this new endeavor. I definitely see how this is going to be a rabbit hole. I probably didn’t need another rabbit hole. LOL!

I have to agree with Larry’s thread...A recording gear and mixing sub-forum would be very nice. It would be a great area of focus. :)
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
the lower the gain the better. use the DAW for volume or the built in focusrite software.

I had a saffire pro 40 for a long time which recorded great. The issue was volume and fullness in play back. Adding gates, compression, VST's for monitoring tends to cause a bit of latency.

Hardware outboarding can solve that but gets expensive. I actualy picked up a presonus 16.0.2 and it has some built in effects so I can monitor off the board with gates, eq, compression etc, and still record my natural drums. It really sounds much better that way.

Clipping is BAD... I use a PA system as well. My gain is super low, I use the mixer faders, or PA volume knob to turn it up. With high gain you get WAY more feed back.

You can always add volume later, you can't fix clipping signals.

REALLY good headphones or IEM's make a difference to the fullness too. I was using vic firth drum earphones forever and it sounded pretty MEH.. when I got my ultimate ears UE5's I realized what drums actualy sound like.. They need clarity and low end to sound good.



My gain is VERY low and I can get some good sounding drums.. It also saves getting a ton of bleed in every mic too.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
So, I just learned how to feed the DAW back into the mix. At least I know why things sounded a bit flat and distant in some regards. Loved the tom sound. It was very close to what I hear just tapping them with no ear protection.

Feeding the DAW back through the mix and compression and EQ have a huuuuge effect...well duh, but I had no idea I wasn’t feeding the DAW back through. I was experiencing some sound shaping with the effects I’d turn on or off, so it just wasn’t that obvious. It’s obvious now. Compression woke the BD and snare up...way up! They now sound full...a bit too full, but haven’t experimented with any settings yet. Just turned stuff on and off.

Now the toms are too much and way too in your face. Compression makes it far worse! Gating sure is interesting. I like how clean the BD and snare are. It really keeps those two mics from picking up the other stuf. On toms though, there’s just nothing natural about that sound! At least not for now.

Overall I’m really glad to have picked up the recording gear, but rudiments, independence excersises, and just time on the set have given way to this new endeavor. I definitely see how this is going to be a rabbit hole. I probably didn’t need another rabbit hole. LOL!

I have to agree with Larry’s thread...A recording gear and mixing sub-forum would be very nice. It would be a great area of focus. :)
Agreed what you said about less time for practice. And yes, it is quite the endeavor. In my mind, anything related to drumming all goes to the same brain storage area, drums. So it's not practicing, but it is still learning about drums and soundwaves.

Could you explain what you mean by feeding the DAW back into the mix? I'm not following.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
Agreed what you said about less time for practice. And yes, it is quite the endeavor. In my mind, anything related to drumming all goes to the same brain storage area, drums. So it's not practicing, but it is still learning about drums and soundwaves.

Could you explain what you mean by feeding the DAW back into the mix? I'm not following.
I had monitor out and headphone out unmuted, so I was effectively hearing the mix twice. It’s why there was so little different with the effects I was applying. It also sounded a bit more distant. Makes sense, if I was hearing things twice. On my headphone out, I also discovered a DAW out, instead of the default, which excluded most sound shaping.
 
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