MIC THE DRUMS THROUGH HOME STEREO SYSTEM

CHIRO

Member
Most passive mixers have a headphone output. Plug the headphones into that.

I don't see the need for the Rolls headphone amp in your case - you'll be sitting next to the mixer, you're not running froma foldback send, you're not running a click through in-ears, etc.
Will a headphone work without amplification? Since the mixer is a passive one?
 

CHIRO

Member
Dear all,

I got my free wharfedale SL824USB mixer from my former band mate.

Also I found these 8 mic system called "Tovaste" it costs a miserly USD 112 or AED 410 in Dubai. Now the question is are cheap things good? Or should I settle for a mid priced Samson 8 kit?

http://uae.souq.com/ae-en/7-piece-drum-microphone-8150666/i/

So are you saying I dont need the rolls system? And the head phones will work on a passive mixer without an amp or powered speaker?

Should I get a 8 xlr snake cable? Or 8 individual XLR cables?
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
My mixer is a wharfedale pro SL824USB passive 8 channel mixer. How would a head phone work without their being an amp.Generally you combine a powered speaker with a passive mixer.Or powered mixer with a passive speaker.
I think you're getting a bit mixed up here. There is a headphone amplifier on the desk but not a speaker amplifier. They are different things.

You're asking a lot of questions mate and I think just by doing a bit of a read around Google (the desk, for instance, has a full manual online http://www.wharfedalepro.com/upload/files/download/w00070_20141226034103_240.pdf)) you could answer a lot of these questions much more quickly.
 

mikel

Platinum Member
Actually what I really like to hear mic'd. Are the toms.
I guess I will have to buy a 7 mic kit.
If I get this right you just want to hear your kit mic'd up through speakers or headphones?

If so, unless you process the sounds in any way, it will sound much as it does playing it in the room. If you process the sounds then it will sound different. What will you achieve from doing this?
 

AudioWonderland

Silver Member
Thank you all for the suggestions.

What I want to do is mic the drums in my room.

I want to be able to connect the mixer to the hi fi amp. So I don't have to spend on powered speakers or powered amp. This is purely for home purpose.

The converter cable is a good idea thank you. However now that you mentioned the risk of blowing out my speakers. No thank you :)

Well the speakers are BOSE surround and a Yamaha sub woofer.
What purpose is served by doing this? If you turn it up to any volume your first kick hit will shoot the sub's driver across the room. Acoustic drums should be more than adequate deafen everyone in a house
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I'm not sure what you're going for.

Most of us I guess use some sort of setup for practicing so we can go for it on the drums and practice along to music without damaging our ears.

Personally, I use a very simple setup for this, just a bass drum mic and a couple of overheads.

Yes, any mixer with a headphone output will drive a pair of headphones just fine.

IMO, I'd go quality over quantity any time as unpleasant sound and noise is gonna ruin your experience more than anything.

When buying a mixer, be sure it has the number and type of inputs you need. Your overheads will be condencers, so you'll need phantom power for those.

If you want to record, the mixer will also have a recording out with RCA cables. The balance of what you want to hear when playing as opposed to a finished recording is probalby gonna be way off, due to bleed from the drums into the headphones and other things too. Wanna fix balance afterwards you need to record several tracks, which is a completely other problem, but they do make rather inexpensive multi track recorders that would do this just fine and probably serve you as a decent mixer for practicing as well.
 

CHIRO

Member
Here is the latest development buddies,


I have passed the passive mixer through my Laney G300 vintage bass head to the Hartke "18" 2 way speaker. All channels in the mixer are alive and the normal condenser mic works fine through XLR. Now all I need are the 7 drum mics.

My question to you experts is,

Will there be any issue connecting drum mics to this set up?

I am guessing not. Since it is built for bass guitar.
 

CHIRO

Member
I'm not sure what you're going for.

Most of us I guess use some sort of setup for practicing so we can go for it on the drums and practice along to music without damaging our ears.

Personally, I use a very simple setup for this, just a bass drum mic and a couple of overheads.

Yes, any mixer with a headphone output will drive a pair of headphones just fine.

IMO, I'd go quality over quantity any time as unpleasant sound and noise is gonna ruin your experience more than anything.

When buying a mixer, be sure it has the number and type of inputs you need. Your overheads will be condencers, so you'll need phantom power for those.

If you want to record, the mixer will also have a recording out with RCA cables. The balance of what you want to hear when playing as opposed to a finished recording is probalby gonna be way off, due to bleed from the drums into the headphones and other things too. Wanna fix balance afterwards you need to record several tracks, which is a completely other problem, but they do make rather inexpensive multi track recorders that would do this just fine and probably serve you as a decent mixer for practicing as well.
Just home playing and may be recording. Just like to hear the toms through a mic system. Thats all. No gigs no studio. Just bed room drumming :)
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
If I get this right you just want to hear your kit mic'd up through speakers or headphones?

If so, unless you process the sounds in any way, it will sound much as it does playing it in the room. If you process the sounds then it will sound different. What will you achieve from doing this?
I do get where he's coming from here.

A few years ago I mic'd my drums in my practice room (a bedroom) and had them going through isolating headphones. I did this so that I could better blend my playing with backing tracks, metronomes, etc. at safe volume levels.

I wouldn't have specifically have only bought the equipment for this purpose, though. I already had it for my project studio so I used it for personal monitoring and recording and it worked nicely.

On its own, it's not worth it. If you already have the gear, it's better - but not £600 better. I did it with an 8-in interface and my old iMac.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
It's putting it through the stereo speakers I don't really get.

Miking up for playing along to metronome, drum machine and backing tracks I fully get as that's my whole day right there. I practice at stage volume, so with most styles, my ears would be dead in a day if I didn't do that.

Just one mic would do the trick. A couple of overheads are a little nicer and for most situations you need to hear the attack of the bass drum to practice effectively.

The overheads will pick up everything nicely and it will help you practicing your internal balance. More mics when recording is nice because it gives you more options for mixing and separate processing, but for practicing, it's not really necessary. I used to have a 57 on the snare as well, but I generally don't anymore.

I just use a small mixer a cheap mic pre on the overheads that I initially got to get a signal to the wet cabs in my guitar rig. Not necessary, it just sounds so much better with that guy plugged in and I use the same fx unit from that rig in the loop of the mixer.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
Will a headphone work without amplification? Since the mixer is a passive one?
The term 'passive' mixer is misleading, because it has come to mean any mixer that doesn't contain a high powered amplifier. So called passive mixers indeed have active circuitry and require electrical power to operate. These usually have a headphone output built in.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Here is the latest development buddies,


I have passed the passive mixer through my Laney G300 vintage bass head to the Hartke "18" 2 way speaker. All channels in the mixer are alive and the normal condenser mic works fine through XLR. Now all I need are the 7 drum mics.

My question to you experts is,

Will there be any issue connecting drum mics to this set up?

I am guessing not. Since it is built for bass guitar.
We've already covered this, though. You are going to have a much better listening experience - and get what you are looking for - by plugging isolation headphones or in-ear monitors into the headphone jack on the mixer. There's no reason to go into an open air speaker of any size, shape, or volume if what you are looking for is purer sound from your instrument. You will be torturing your ears with too much volume, and you won't hear the "better" sound from the mics on your drums because the actual sound they are creating in the near field will be overpowering the sound from the speaker.

Just get some drum mics, plug them into your mixer, and plug headphones into your mixer. You will be done, and happy.
 

CHIRO

Member
We've already covered this, though. You are going to have a much better listening experience - and get what you are looking for - by plugging isolation headphones or in-ear monitors into the headphone jack on the mixer. There's no reason to go into an open air speaker of any size, shape, or volume if what you are looking for is purer sound from your instrument. You will be torturing your ears with too much volume, and you won't hear the "better" sound from the mics on your drums because the actual sound they are creating in the near field will be overpowering the sound from the speaker.

Just get some drum mics, plug them into your mixer, and plug headphones into your mixer. You will be done, and happy.
Thank you. Yes thats what I will do. Glad I only have to spend on mics now. I will go for the Samson 7 kit.
 

iwearnohats

Silver Member
Just to stick my two cents in:

I don't think it's a good idea to practice listening to yourself through headphones/in-ear monitors. I've used this a few times when recording but purely so I can hear parts of the kit that are quieter from my perspective (such as the kick). That's my experience though. I much prefer to listen to my drums 'live'. A little bit of monitoring is useful in an open-air stage, but in almost every closed environment I've played in it's totally unnecessary.

You're not going to be able to hear your drums correctly and learn to play them with correct dynamics if you're listening to them through microphones as your sense of dynamics will be distorted.

If you want to actually do proper recordings and listen back to yourself, it's one thing, but if you want to sit in your bedroom and 'monitor' your drums, I think it's a waste of time and money.

If you are serious about recording, then I would also forget about that Samson 7-pack, and save up some money for some good mics. Something like the Audix i5 for the snare, Sennheiser e904 on the toms, Audix i6 on the bassdrum, and a couple of overheads (RODE NT5 are fantastic value for overheads). These aren't the most expensive drum mics in the world but they're not uncommon to be seen in usage live and in studios.

If you have a limited budget to start with, get a snare, kick and two overhead mics. Record yourself playing - don't monitor - and listen back to yourself. Then you can make corrections while listening to what you're actually playing.
 

CHIRO

Member
Dear all,

Thank you for all the expert comments.

I have successfully connected the 12 channel mixer to my bass amp and speaker. The head phone works with the amp and without the amp. And IPOD too. Now I have to wait until I can afford the 7 drum mics :)

I am leaving this forum for now.

Thank you again.
 
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