Metronome app that speeds up and then slows down

Skrivarna

Senior Member
I can't believe I haven't been able to find a metronome app that can be programmed to speed up AND THEN slow back down to the original tempo.
Thanks a lot for the idea! I wrote a small metronome app (the Andronome) and have added accelerando+decellerando in the to-do for the next update. Nice feature.

Any other ideas for the wish list?
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I read something recently (wish I remember where) that analyzed tempo consistency in different music from different eras. Turns out in the days before click tracks many great songs sped up and slowed down in a regular pattern that some feel enhances the build up and release of musical tension in a pleasing manner.
Right, but you're talking about practice, which needs to be precise... The ebb and flow of a live performance, or even recorded band performance can and likely should breathe, but it will happen on it's own. You don't want to practice with an un-steady meter.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Metronomes are for keeping the meter steady. You can speed up and slow down all on your own. But hey if that's how you want to use one.
Exactly. Think of the metronome click as your quarter notes, set it relatively low, and then sub-divide to go "faster". Trust us when we tell you that this is much more beneficial for your overall drumming than simply changing the click tempo.
 

dbruce

Junior Member
I ran into this issue a few months ago. Best solution I found, and looking back I really don't regret the price(granted i wouldn't mind have finding a solution much cheaper) but this thing is really useful. If you can afford it, the Boss DB90 is what I went with when looking for the same thing. Seemed like going into guitar centers or asking around online people always were confused why you wanted such a tool. But the more I started looking into Alan Dawson the more I wanted one haha. Anyways here's a link to one place that sells them: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/boss-db-90-dr.-beat-metronome

The only issue i have with these are they aren't very loud when I'm playing on a kit, even with headphones in. Just hard to hear over my snare and through my ear plugs I wear religiously these days trying not to go 100% deaf...lol... And you might want to invest in the power supply to go with it unless you don't mind switching 9v batteries all the time...I left it on one time on accident and came back and it was dead. I think the battery only lasted me 2 or 3 days maybe. It does shut off by itself after awhile but still...

I have seen apps on my android that do offer an automatic tempo change, but I don't remember any of them slowing down. I didn't have a smartphone when I bought the metronome, and I havn't felt a need to look for an app since I just use the metronome. It stays next to my drum set and never moves. If you have an extra stand you can mount it to a stand with threading, or it does have a flimsy stand that I accidentally broke...It is kinda poorly designed fold out but, I don't take very good care of my stuff to begin with.

I didn't read the rest of the thread very much just a quick scan through. Sorry if this metronome has been mentioned already. Good luck. I recommend it, it has a lot of bells and whistles to it to look into but I mostly use the speed trainer and just like having the ability to quickly change between tempos with the dial, though it didcost an arm and a leg (way more than I could afford at the time but I don't regret it...lol). Good luck again.

edit: the only other option is to find a tab app that plays back audio and create your own click tracks. I did this with guitar pro for a couple weeks before just going and buying that metronome. Guitar Pro has a speed trainer, but i don't think it slows down...I can't remember. Only cool thing about this is having the ability to create click tracks that alternate time signatures. Though I've seen metronomes with programmable patterns to create your own click track built in as recently seeing a android app that allowed me to alternate between two tempos...I'll have to just get more comfy with android dev and make my own app I guess if i wanna use my phone...lol
 

davezedlee

Senior Member
Thanks for the suggestions both serious and humorous... Perhaps I am not clearly explaining myself.

In order to practice both rudiments and grooves and to notice and control grip, fulcrum, types of stroke etc. I would like to be able to program a metronome to start at say 40 bpm and move at regular time intervals or even better continuously to about 220 bpm (depending on my ability with the given pattern) and then back down again over the same period of time. I don't want to change it by hand myself, I want to see how I it works as I speed up and slow down, notice the transition points. I have apps the speed up gradually or in preset steps (like 10 bpm) but can't find one that will also slow down. I can't be the only person who would like this for practice. I Would think there would be cheap or free apps by the dozens but so far the one suggested was 10 bucks. Seems pricy given that partially programable metronomes are much less. Time Trainer is a good example. Ipad compatibility is needed
a Roland TD-3 module has a function that allows you to cycle between a high and lower tempo, and lets you set the number of bars as well as the bpm steps

not as convenient as on your phone, but they can be found for cheap

either that, or create a wave or mp3 file on a computer that does the same thing, and just import it to your music library
 

Griffman

Member
The band I am in likes to vary tempo. We take a grove pattern and I speed up /slow down when I feel like it and they follow. Works great :)
I read something recently (wish I remember where) that analyzed tempo consistency in different music from different eras. Turns out in the days before click tracks many great songs sped up and slowed down in a regular pattern that some feel enhances the build up and release of musical tension in a pleasing manner.
 

drum4fun27302

Gold Member
The band I am in likes to vary tempo. We take a grove pattern and I speed up /slow down when I feel like it and they follow. Works great :)
 

Griffman

Member
It's generally better to play, stop, reset, start again over speeding up. Even Stanton Moore thinks so.
I'm in no position to disagree with Stanton, but I do wish there was some way to more effectively and objectively evaluate different ways of practicing. It's likely Stanton is 100% correct but it is also possible that it's just one more piece of drum wisdom that is really just traditions being past on or a personal idiosyncrasy of a great drummer that we emulate.

Kind of hijacking my own thread but let me give an example. It seems a lot of drummers here are putting mucho time on Chaffee's books. I think the thinking behind that is "hey it worked for Vinny so it must work for me" or "Neil, Dave, and Steve bought into Freddy's methods so he must be a genius"

Now I am not totally ignorant and I can see the logic in both the patterns series and some of the philosophy of Freddy, but isn't it equally true that all four of those drummers would have been great without Gary Chaffee and Freddy Gruber.

But due to the lack of many double blind randomized studies on practice techniques we as musicians may well be unable to separate the wheat from the chaff as practice methods are passed down.

So I am going to go with the advise of Stanton and others because hey... They may be wrong... But they have a much greater likelihood of being right than me because I'm struggling to become mediocre and others are better drummers with way more experience. But I wish we had real data in addition to emulating the best and hoping something they did that we emulate is causative and not merely correlative of the results they have had.
 

vxla

Silver Member
It's generally better to play, stop, reset, start again over speeding up. Even Stanton Moore thinks so.
 

Griffman

Member
Thanks for the suggestions both serious and humorous... Perhaps I am not clearly explaining myself.

In order to practice both rudiments and grooves and to notice and control grip, fulcrum, types of stroke etc. I would like to be able to program a metronome to start at say 40 bpm and move at regular time intervals or even better continuously to about 220 bpm (depending on my ability with the given pattern) and then back down again over the same period of time. I don't want to change it by hand myself, I want to see how I it works as I speed up and slow down, notice the transition points. I have apps the speed up gradually or in preset steps (like 10 bpm) but can't find one that will also slow down. I can't be the only person who would like this for practice. I Would think there would be cheap or free apps by the dozens but so far the one suggested was 10 bucks. Seems pricy given that partially programable metronomes are much less. Time Trainer is a good example. Ipad compatibility is needed
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Metronomes are for keeping the meter steady. You can speed up and slow down all on your own. But hey if that's how you want to use one.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Stanton Moore, you may know him, was at a clinic here and his suggestion was not to do that. do your 80 bpm exercise. STOP, do your 100, STOP do your 120 etc. Don't try to speed up on the fly.
 

Griffman

Member
Just change your sub division and leave the speed alone.
That might work but I was looking for a very gradual speed up and slow down over time for pad practice. I wanted to focus on the subtle changes in grip and stroke - sort of just like the directions from Stick Control but with a click track
 
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