Mesh Heads

jeffwj

Platinum Member
I have mesh heads on a Pacific Chameleon set that I bought about 6 years ago. They have been played on year after year and the heads still look brand new. They seem to repel dirt, because I never need to clean them (and they are white in color). The only head I have ever had to replace is the bass drum head (I suggest rotating the head from time to time so the same spot is not worn down by the beater). I suggest these heads for my students who live in apartments and really need a quiet sound. The link you provided didn't seem to work for me, but Steve Weiss has them in stock.

First few products on this page http://www.steveweissmusic.com/category/s

Jeff
 

EMingoy

Junior Member
Are those the Pearl heads? Your link didn't work for some reason so I had to look it up on that site myself. So they can take a pounding? And I can play them with them same intensity as I do on the regular heads? Thanks a bunch!
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
Yes. Those are Pearl heads. I have the Pearl head on the bass drum now and Pacific heads on the rest of the set.

Jeff
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
I've owned a full set of mesh heads for years and I really like them for my toms. For the snare, I found that they don't give the same bounce as a tight batter head, so I put a Vic Firth practice pad on top of the snare, which gives me a great response with just a little snare buzz so it "feels" like I'm playing a snare. (Picture below)

Depending on what kind of beater you use, the mesh head may work just fine for your kick, but I personally didn't have a lot of luck with it. The beaters I use have circular felt and plastic contact points, and this wore out the mesh head pretty quickly. Jeff is right, you can get in the habit of rotating the head every couple of times you play. Another good trick is to find some way to put an impact patch on the head. What you could do is fasten two impact pads to each side of the head where your beater hits. Glue doesn't really work and the sticky on the back of the patches won't hold it on, so you might try sewing the patches to the head (you can't hurt the head doing this, it's essentially a very fine net).

Other things I have tried and liked for the bass drum include the SoundOff bass drum mute (with the little rubber pad in the center, see the picture); using one of those things that you see in a drum shop to try out the bass pedals (Pearl sells one in the catalog, so you don't have to wheel and deal with a drum department salesperson like I did - again, see the picture); or possibly the most simple technique of all: Stuff the bass drum full of something very dense. I owned a huge, heavy fake mink blanket I bought in Korea many years ago; I stuffed that in my bass drum and it pressed up against both heads, leaving only the beater-to-batter sound.

Good luck.... hope you find any of this helps.
 

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jeffwj

Platinum Member
For the snare, I found that they don't give the same bounce as a tight batter head, so I put a Vic Firth practice pad on top of the snare, which gives me a great response with just a little snare buzz so it "feels" like I'm playing a snare.
Yes, I forgot to mention that.

Jeff
 

EMingoy

Junior Member
And you both use the Pearl heads? Thanks, that helps me out a lot. So I don't need a mesh head on my bass drum if I buy that SoundOff bass mute? Or should I use them both at once for the best results?
At which store can I purchase both of the heads and the soundoff bass mute?
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
I use the Pearl heads, but I haven't heard any bad comments about any of the other brands of mesh heads.

You could use the Soundoff mute with either a real head or a mesh head. With a real head, you will get some bass drum sound, but muffled. With a mesh head you would probably get nothing but feel, it would be very quiet and that would alleviate any head tearing from your beaters.

You can buy the heads and the Soundoff mute from most online stores, do a Google Shopping search for "HQ Soundoff bass drum mute".
 
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