MB's Random Question Thread

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MasterBlaster

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As a guitar player who's always loved percussion but never really had a kit before until now, I have a lot to learn and many questions. Before I ask I always search first but I don't always find an answer.

When that happens I'd rather just ask in this thread instead of derailing another or starting a new thread. I hope that's OK.

My first question is about cymbal packs.


Does anyone have any thoughts on that Bonham cymbal pack?
Am I crazy for wanting that? Is it overkill for a hobbyist like myself? Should I be more reserved and get something like this instead?

Oh, and I'm a serious hobbiest... money isn't really (so to speak) a problem and I plan to build my kit over time.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
If you're doing zepp cover band work then I'd say sure.

Otherwise I'd say don't be lazy and put together a cymbal set based on your own personal experience with each cymbal you demoed yourself. Keep your mind open but do also a bit of research on the different types of cymbals and the sorts of sounds you want to go for.

If someone is really gung ho about buying a set of cymbals, I usually recommend the literal middle of the road standard A's. They'll work for the most ranges of stuff and nobody will dislike the sounds.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
It can be a long, long journey hunting for cymbals. If I were to start again, I would start with a good complementary set of hats and ride - the heart of your setup.
Cymbal packs seem a great deal, but you may find yourself confined to one sound with all the "matchy-ness" of them, or one of the cymbals doesn't work for you.
If money is no object, then you could get either set and sell them on if your tastes change.
 
M

MasterBlaster

Guest
Believe me, I have no problem selling what I'm not happy with. I'm already on my 2nd kit, and I'm already ready to sell it so I can upgrade again.

I was just hoping a nice (read expensive) pack would be a quick way to satisfy my immediate needs. I didn't realize I was being lazy.

So the Bonham pack is just for huge sound? I can't use a deft touch when necessary?
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
So the Bonham pack is just for huge sound? I can't use a deft touch when necessary?
IMO, the bright, big 2002s work well for Zeppelin because of the way the kit was recorded, and the aggressive guitar sounds. It's just too bright a cymbal sound for anything but heavy rock (Zeppelin, 80s hair metal, Tool, etc.). More recently, heavy rock and metal drummers are favoring a somewhat darker, trashier, more complex cymbal sound.

What sort of music will you be playing in the next couple of years? What is instrumentation and sonic palate of the bands? Answer those questions, and the sort of cymbals you should buy becomes clearer.
 
M

MasterBlaster

Guest
As of now I only play with myself - no plans of ever being in a band other than jamming with friends at my house.

But I want the best.

I actually don't know WHAT type of cymbal sound I want. I just want it to sound AWESOME.

I guess I like rock, a lot of country.... and jazz? Not sure yet...
 

eclipseownzu

Gold Member
I actually don't know WHAT type of cymbal sound I want. I just want it to sound AWESOME.
Great answer! I dont think this is lazy at all. That cymbal pack is definitely going to sound Awesome. I would play Paistes if I could, but I tend to break them more than others, so I play other cymbals I like instead. I am really a fan of the Paiste Sigs, but the 2002's are killer. I think a cymbal pack is an excellent way to start. You can build on it from there and find what works and doesnt work for you. Plenty of non-rock drummers play Paistes, and they work well with a hard of soft touch. Its up to you to play them appropriately.

I will say that is a lot of scratch for a set of cymbals, but if you have it to spend you might as well get the best.
 
M

MasterBlaster

Guest
I do NOT plan to die with a ton of money in the bank.

I want it in my living room.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
As of now I only play with myself - no plans of ever being in a band other than jamming with friends at my house.

But I want the best.

I actually don't know WHAT type of cymbal sound I want. I just want it to sound AWESOME.

I guess I like rock, a lot of country.... and jazz? Not sure yet...
https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/K0801C--zildjian-country-k-cymbal-set?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIwbHQqpih2gIVjbbACh3zcwhrEAQYEyABEgLcc_D_BwE

These might be more up your alley! A darker, more modern sound, with larger sizes. You might not dig the 20" Crash Ride, but you can use it as a large crash and add a different ride, or sell it and replace the cymbal with something more your style.
 
M

MasterBlaster

Guest
Interesting

What makes a cymbal a "country" cymbal???
 

mmulcahy1

Platinum Member
If the Bonham cymbal pack floats your boat, go for it.

I went through many cymbals after I first started but couldn't find anything that floated said boat. Then one day I came across an 18" Giant Beat. Wow! I built the rest of my cymbals around that. Now it's Paiste 18 & 20 Giant Beats with Paiste 2002 20" ride and 15" Sound Edge hi-hats. Pretty Bonhamesque but they work for a lot of different music.
 

eclipseownzu

Gold Member
If the Bonham cymbal pack floats your boat, go for it.

I went through many cymbals after I first started but couldn't find anything that floated said boat. Then one day I came across an 18" Giant Beat. Wow! I built the rest of my cymbals around that. Now it's Paiste 18 & 20 Giant Beats with Paiste 2002 20" ride and 15" Sound Edge hi-hats. Pretty Bonhamesque but they work for a lot of different music.
I did the same with the 20" AAXplosion. It is the basis of my entire cymbal setup and everything else is bought to complement its sound.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Re: Interesting

What makes a cymbal a "country" cymbal???
It's in line with what the Nashville guys are playing these days. Which means, not a heavy, pingy hunk of metal -- something thinner and lighter with more "wash".

A thinner ride would also lend itself well to jazz, if you decide to travel that trail.
 

Steady Freddy

Pioneer Member
The Paiste 2002 line of cymbals are great. They are very bright and perfect for rock. A little more expensive than other cymbal packs but well worth the extra money. I've been using them for the past couple of years and love em.
 
M

MasterBlaster

Guest
When I want to tax myself, I'll attempt to play along to some jazz.

It's not very pretty.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Re: Interesting

What makes a cymbal a "country" cymbal???
The pitch, amount of wash, and note duration/decay.

When you think of country, you have bass, guitar, banjo, fiddle, pedal steel, and two vocals working 3rds and 4ths. In theory, the country pack is made to avoid stepping on the parts of the spectrum occupied by these other instruments. In reality, it's just a bunch of guesswork to make the cymbals fit into the most common use cases of the genre.

So it's basically a marketing label with a halfhearted, but well intentioned, implementation.
 
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