LOUD metronome?

lowdowner

Senior Member
Can anyone give me any advice on a brand of LOUD metronomes? I have a Korg one at the moment that I used to use in the bad old days when I played guitar but I can't hear it over my drums (with or without earplugs).

Any recommendations?
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
An amplifier? Use the clicker you have with a stereo or other amp of some kind to make it loud.
 

Fuo

Platinum Member
Tama Rythym Watch is pretty loud, but I think you have a bigger problem if you can't hear what you already have over your drums with earplugs. You need some kinda hearing protection, or you're gonna hurt yourself. Get yourself some earphones or headphones with isolation, then you'll protect your ears and be able to any metronome you plug them into.

I use and like Etymonics mc5s, but there's also shures, vic firth headphones, Seinhauser headphones, etc.
 

lowdowner

Senior Member
Tama Rythym Watch is pretty loud, but I think you have a bigger problem if you can't hear what you already have over your drums with earplugs. You need some kinda hearing protection, or you're gonna hurt yourself. Get yourself some earphones or headphones with isolation, then you'll protect your ears and be able to any metronome you plug them into.

I use and like Etymonics mc5s, but there's also shures, vic firth headphones, Seinhauser headphones, etc.
I have earplugs that were moulded for my ears (professional jobbies i had made when I was playing bass) - but I can't hear the metronome when I have them in....
 

lowdowner

Senior Member
Wait a minute, you have the metronome also going to the earplugs, right?
Nope - they're not 'active'. I can look into that. I just wondered if there was a metronome that was loud enough to hear through the earplugs... I can hear the drums after all...
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
The loudest metronome I know of is the McAdams-- the fanciest new ones are expensive, but maybe you can find an old used one. If you're going to run yours through headphones, I would get full size ones, and wear ear plugs underneath, so you don't blow out your hearing trying to get the click loud enough. I run my DB-33 through a PA, so that's something you can do, too.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Nope - they're not 'active'. I can look into that. I just wondered if there was a metronome that was loud enough to hear through the earplugs... I can hear the drums after all...
Ah. You could get a small mixer and plug the metronome in as well and mix to taste in your IEMs, yes?
 

lowdowner

Senior Member
Ah. You could get a small mixer and plug the metronome in as well and mix to taste in your IEMs, yes?
That might be the way to go - i thought there might be a 'drummer's metronome' though with a really loud click.

Plugging it into an amp sounds like the way to go...
 

Fuo

Platinum Member
That might be the way to go - i thought there might be a 'drummer's metronome' though with a really loud click.

Plugging it into an amp sounds like the way to go...
Yea, Tama Rythym Watch. Very loud, plus LEDs.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Yea, Tama Rythym Watch. Very loud, plus LEDs.
In addition to the Tama Rhythm Watch, I have the Boss Dr.Beat which I bought 15 years ago for $90. Love it. It can get super loud, but there's 1/4" plug output to plug it in to something. Not as sophisticated as the Rhythm Watch, I just need it to set tempos, but it'll do subdivisions and accent which beat you want. You could also watch the LED blink and lock in that way.
 

Liebe zeit

Silver Member
I use a Tama Ryhthm Watch with Vic Firth isolating headphones. Sometimes I have to nudge one of the phones off to hear the drums properly
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
Headphones or earbuds will be your best bet. Getting a metronome that's louder than a drum kit will probably require you to run it through a PA system, and will definitely not benefit your hearing.

I have a Tama Rhythm Watch and a set of Shure earbuds (the cheapest in-ear monitors they offer), and it works great. The in-ears isolate enough for me to not damage my hearing, and allow me to keep the click down to a comfortable level.
 
You can try my Bounce Metronome, lots of drummers use it.

It's no louder than any other metronome that you run on a computer, but you can also use it purely visually.

If you've not tried it before - the visual bounce is a similar motion to the one used by conductors when they bounce the baton off an "invisible plane" and is also like the motion of a drum stick.

It is easy and precise to follow.

Metronome for Deaf Musicians and Loud Drummers

Another thing to think about. Sometimes when drummers say they can't hear the metronome, it is because they want to hear it as a separate sound on top of their other instruments. But instead, you can try listening out for the "merge" of the metronome with the notes you play. So, you aim to play so that the metronome click vanishes, and you hear a distinctive merge of the metronome with your percussion when that happens.

Just a thought, it might help if you haven't tried that before. It is by far the most precise way to work with the sound of a metronome, and the metronome doesn't have to be quite so loud when you work with it that way. While if you expect to hear it as a separate instrument easy to hear over everything else you hear, then it has to be loud - or else a beep sound - which may be easier to hear but not so precise to work with.

More about it here: The Vanishing Metronome Click - Burying the Click
 
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