London Drum Show forum report

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Yea, stop adding an extra letter to "aluminum" when you say it. Only one I in there.
I know, when I hear that word I want to turn my head sideways like a dog and have that "Uhhhh??" look on my face.
Historical context:


Devising a new, inexpensive method for producing the metal in 1892, American chemist Charles Martin Hall opted to incorporate the "aluminum" variant - which had gained popularity following its inclusion in the 1828 Webster's Dictionary - on his advertising literature, despite having used "aluminium" on all of his patents. It could be argued, then, that "aluminum" in fact remained in the American vernacular quite by accident, if it is to be believed that the variant used in his advertising materials was nothing more than a typo.

"Aluminum" would later be accepted as the official spelling by the American Chemical Society, and though the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry officially recognizes "aluminium", its American counterpart is accepted as an alternative.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
Historical context:


Devising a new, inexpensive method for producing the metal in 1892, American chemist Charles Martin Hall opted to incorporate the "aluminum" variant - which had gained popularity following its inclusion in the 1828 Webster's Dictionary - on his advertising literature, despite having used "aluminium" on all of his patents. It could be argued, then, that "aluminum" in fact remained in the American vernacular quite by accident, if it is to be believed that the variant used in his advertising materials was nothing more than a typo.

"Aluminum" would later be accepted as the official spelling by the American Chemical Society, and though the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry officially recognizes "aluminium", its American counterpart is accepted as an alternative.
Very cool and interesting language history lesson, Andy. Thanks.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Chemists had to adopt IUPAC codification of names because of confusing nomenclature like Anatomist have done the same thing codifying anatomical names. Still many of the variant names are in use.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Historical context:


Devising a new, inexpensive method for producing the metal in 1892, American chemist Charles Martin Hall opted to incorporate the "aluminum" variant - which had gained popularity following its inclusion in the 1828 Webster's Dictionary - on his advertising literature, despite having used "aluminium" on all of his patents. It could be argued, then, that "aluminum" in fact remained in the American vernacular quite by accident, if it is to be believed that the variant used in his advertising materials was nothing more than a typo.

"Aluminum" would later be accepted as the official spelling by the American Chemical Society, and though the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry officially recognizes "aluminium", its American counterpart is accepted as an alternative.
I'm not sure when the rest of the world is going to learn that americans are always right, even when they're wrong. Our sense of being better than everyone else must not be compromised. Our egos are very fragile in that regard. Also... TomAAAAAAto. Not Tomoto.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I'm not sure when the rest of the world is going to learn that americans are always right, even when they're wrong. Our sense of being better than everyone else must not be compromised. Our egos are very fragile in that regard. Also... TomAAAAAAto. Not Tomoto.
Be sure to send that statement to the Trump campaign headquarters. I'm sure they'll eat it up ;)

Andy and Aluminium have a long history and friendship.
Excellent - although I'm not sure I appreciate the implication I'm "his only friend" material. I have at least two friends at the last count ;)
 
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