Live Drum Miking Help??

Hello to the drummers of the Internet! I really need some live miking help like--seriously. I'm a complete retard at this and require a sound guy to do this for me but there is a venue I'm gonna be playing in and I basically have to do all the drum stuff for miking and maybe even mixing. To start off with I use 8 mics-
3 Toms
2 Overheads
1 Hi-Hat
1 Bass Drum
1 Snare Drum
To give you information about the venue - the sound room is really far and above live a theater... There are 6 XLR ports on the wall for the drum mics to go to the main mixer. Now that's the problem... I need a solution to fit all 8 drum mics (no more, no less) to be delivered to the main mixer. I have no idea how to do this--I've heard that you can use a pre-amp to add additional XLR ports but I have no idea how to connect all that stuff together also (I'm gonna need some help on that...). Can anyone tell me how to do this? (I'd also appreciate if you guys can help me with using IEMs in this situation)
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
Hello to the drummers of the Internet! I really need some live miking help like--seriously. I'm a complete retard at this and require a sound guy to do this for me but there is a venue I'm gonna be playing in and I basically have to do all the drum stuff for miking and maybe even mixing. To start off with I use 8 mics-
3 Toms
2 Overheads
1 Hi-Hat
1 Bass Drum
1 Snare Drum
To give you information about the venue - the sound room is really far and above live a theater... There are 6 XLR ports on the wall for the drum mics to go to the main mixer. Now that's the problem... I need a solution to fit all 8 drum mics (no more, no less) to be delivered to the main mixer.
with correct positioning of the snare mic & overheads, you can easily do away with the hi hat mic. That saves one channel. If you group the two overheads together (Y connector) & run them mono, you can save another channel. Even if you added a pre stage with extra inputs, they would effectively be grouped anyhow, & the desk would have no individual control of the grouped mic's.

Alternatively, have you thought of using almost "over the shoulder" overhead mic positioning & going without the close tom mic's, or maybe just close mic the floor tom?
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
If I were in your situation, here's what I'd do:

I'd mic the kick, snare, three rack toms, and one overhead (which may not even be needed). Unless y'all are just super loud or your cymbals are small, you should be able to hear them without much trouble in most places.

If you really want all 8 mics, you could always borrow a small soundboard that has about 4 XLR inputs. You could always run your toms through just one channel using the board and use the sound check as a time to make sure that they are all getting an even signal. Or, you could just run your two overheads through the board.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
The only way I can think of to get more signals through the available XLR's would be a digital snake, with an active digital stage box at either end. This would be extremely expensive, and you'd end up with many more channels than you need. And the mixer at the other end may not have enough inputs anyway.

I agree with 'keep it simple' that you should use six mikes - i'd go with one per drum and one high overhead. The overhead can be EQ'd to favour cymbal frequencies, (so it won't emphasize the closest toms) and you'd avoid potential phase problems from multiple overheads picking up the middle cymbals. I've used this setup dozens of times in very large venues, very effectively.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
Assuming you have a typical two up, one down tom arrangement, the solution is simple. Use one mic to cover the two mounted toms (position it right in the middle of the toms), and eliminate the hi hat mic (if the snare mic is properly positioned, it will pick up the hi hat with no problem). Done.
I've used this miking arrangement repeatedly with great results.

Concerning IEMs, somebody else will have to help you as I have zero experience with them.
 

bigiainw

Gold Member
It seems fairly simple to me- you either cut down on the number of mics involved or you pre-mix some of the mics and use only the number of inputs you have. We had a similar issue with my last band and the solution was that I bought my own mixer that I used to mix the drums down to a stereo feed and that went to the main desk. The advantage in that scenario was that the guy who mixed our sound (when we used our PA) was a guitarist who wouldn't have recognised how to get a decent drum sound if it was married to him, so I retained control of my own sound and how it was (or in my case, how it wasn't processed). It worked for us in those situations. When working in other venues with their own sound and engineer- there were either ample inputs or an engineer who knew his gear and venue and how to mic the kit within the limitations that he had.

As for inears, if theree is a monitor feed for the drums, then it's usually fairly easy to hijack that and feed it into your inears. I use a Shure P6HW which has 2 xlr inputs so you can mix different sources or do a stereo feed for yourself. In my set up I usually take a feed from the main PA (I like a bit of everything in my monitors) which goes into my little personal monitor amp (so I can set the level of my vocals in my monitors too) and then into my IEMs and one from my mixer so I can have the drums as high or as low in the mix as I choose (I generally choose High...). In an engineered situation, the chaps will usually just tell you to lug in here and sort you out by their electronic magic! I use my IEMs as joint monitoring and as hearing priotection as well to the point that I have been using them so long that sitting playing a kit with nothing in my ears and unfiltered drum kit sound is not a process I enjoy that much!
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
QUOTE: "Would a wireless instrument system for the some of the mics like maybe the overheads work?"

Excellent suggestion. Even easier - just use a couple of handheld wireless mics on the toms. Vocal mics work well on toms. Then keep the cables for the specialised kick/snare/condenser mics.
 

drum4fun27302

Gold Member
Being live, one overhead will work just fine. No need for stereo imagine (you don't want the people on the right side of the place not to hear what you panned on the other side!!)
Hi hat isn't needed either. It will be picked up by the snare and the one overhead .

That makes it 6 :)
 
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