Listening to Jazz-Not as simple as it seems.

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
You're right. My bad. Newton invented math of the calculus to describe his theory of gravity. Einstein came along and used the calculus to turn Newton's law upside down with his Special Theory of Relativity and his field equations about how stress/energy cause curvature of space/time.He sorta re-invented and used the math, but you're right Newton actually came up with it.

In the context of this thread, still good examples of something morphing and changing like gospel to blues to rock. Or gospel to blues to jazz.The math isn't difficult on purpose it wasn't invented to to be difficult it was invented for a purpose. It's difficult by nature. That's not elitist. But if someone takes the jazz genre and writes pieces that are difficult to play and hard to listen to just to make them difficult to play and hard to listen to, that's elitist.


Um. Isaac Newton and Gottfried Leibniz developed calculus in the 1600's...
 

Groov-E

Silver Member
I often put on the "State of Jazz" Playlist on Spotify on random and then go deeper when I hear something I enjoy.

For easy listening and fun play-alongs, I like the Frescalalto album by Lee Konitz.

Just wanted to chip in a constructive manner.
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
Most of what I could possibly say has been said by Tony. No point of double posting.

I come at this perhaps from a slightly different perspective.

- Because my dad was a hardcore jazz music lover, jazz drummer and became somewhat of a historian, I grew up on jazz roots from what began as Louis Armstrong Hot 5’s/7’s and went all the way through big band, swing, Dizzy, Bird, Clifford Brown and The Jazz Messengers. Hell, I heard music that came before Hot 5's/7's to see how that developed.

- When I saw “I grew up on it”… I mean I didn’t have a clue ANY other style of music existed until Soul Train began playing on our TV sets when I was about 12. Jazz (in its various forms) was all I heard… period.. and I heard it daily.

- When I hear about “going back” as in learning the history, if you listen to enough of any style of music you like, you will probably get curious enough to begin searching for the roots. Kids born today who may begin to love rock will probably eventually make their way back to Ringo and then what came before Ringo to get Ringo.

- Jazz is a style that is different from most other music forms, but it is still music. No need to over-complicate it. If you listen to things that spark your interest, be open to the search and you will find your answers to the evolution. You may find things you hate about it. I do… I don’t take to Avant-Garde very well. But many love it. So be it.

- As with any and all styles, be open to exploring and then figuring out what you want to take and what you want to leave.

Most importantly enjoy it… or not…. Your call..

ETA... For the last 3-4 years I've been focused on studying classical clarinet and that has presented some of the same concepts as the OP raises. Going back to listening... how far back and where... I approach it as I've stated above.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
Cranial jazz is cranial jazz.

I think there was and possibly still a trend towards passive listening. Around the sixties you had the combination of white blight in the cities paired with longer commutes, that meant people were listening to more things on the radio and at home rather than participating in groups. Jazz's response was to generate cranial "Avant garde" pieces to listen to(rather than to dance).

Rock sort of morphed into sing-a-longs, or as I like to think about the songs as steering wheel operas, where you could sort of sing-a-long as you sit at the stop light on the way to the show.
 
Top