Like to know what the forum thinks

evilg99

Platinum Member
Don had (has) an everlasting positive influence on me. I love his playing on all the Eagles stuff. I really don't dig his recorded drum sound (from the 70's/80's) at all - but it doesn't matter...the music moved me. Nothing conjures up crystal clear memories of my youth more than an Eagles tune. Never even thought about his 'chops' or lack of them.

Neal
 
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evilg99

Platinum Member
I have always been a huge fan of Don Henley. Rock solid drummer, amazing voice, and one of the most gifted songwriters ever.

A couple of my favorite drumming tracks are "The Last Resort" and "On The Border".
^^^^
+++ One million
But I don't know if it's the drumming or the singing or the clever writing or all of it that really resonates with me...probably the sum of the parts.
I like how Don's drumming is solid, simple stuff between the kick, snare and hi hat mostly. And how he's not smashing crash cymbals every 5 seconds.
Fills tend to support other instruments/song structure rather than being fills just for the sake of fills...
For me, one of his very best drumming tunes was Take it to the Limit...that simple ride pattern is just awesome....it's the pulse of the whole song.

Neal
 
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DancingMadlyBackwards

Senior Member
Statements like this make our chops-infested brethren take a more fatalistic outlook on life, eh?
It's nice and smart to be technically aware and capable....but it is a tool that belongs in the tool chest to be brought out once in a while. Problem is, folks want to show what they can do and impress others; that's usually not conducive to making good music or being a respected musician. Moderation and restraint are tools that should come out of the chest far more often.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
It's nice and smart to be technically aware and capable....but it is a tool that belongs in the tool chest to be brought out once in a while. Problem is, folks want to show what they can do and impress others; that's usually not conducive to making good music or being a respected musician. Moderation and restraint are tools that should come out of the chest far more often.
Yeah, too bad I didn't figure this out until my 30s ;)
 

keep it simple

Platinum Member
I remember years ago Don was featured on the cover of Modern Drummer and the subsequent issues they printed mail of people complaining that he shouldn't have been featured at all because he's "not a drummer". Apparently, there's alot of drummers out there that don't get it.
& I see them every week. For some strange reason, tom angles seem to be a common theme. Kinda like a visual warning to only buy a half pint instead of a pint ;)

Don Henley = Ringo on steroids.
 

coolhand1969

Senior Member
I was really unsure what the forum would say about Don, I thought he might get bashed, but I was wrong. I am glad, it shows a true understanding of all of the different styles of drumming: from Bonham and the power, Neil and the technicality and speed to Ringo the perfect timekeeper playing for the music.
 

larryz

Platinum Member
Take a look at The History of The Eagles DVD. Excellent and shows that Henley is a no b.s. kinda dude. Always loved his playing and songwriting. Of course Ludwigs...

Shows that flashy chops not always necessary. Intro to Hotel California right before "on a dark desert highway..." the bump-bump. Well placed.
 

bigiainw

Gold Member
Shows that flashy chops not always necessary. Intro to Hotel California right before "on a dark desert highway..." the bump-bump. Well placed.
I've heard it said that its the spaces inbetween the notes that are more important than the notes themselves, and it seems to me that Don Henley epitimises that approach.
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
Henley was very well paid for everything he did. boy did this thread get sidetracked.
OP, playing 7 hours straight is great exercise and it will be rare you will ever be called upon to play a marathon that long anywhere. although I did do 5 hours once with. Walter Ostanek. He himself was calling up guest players like Canada's fiddle champ etc all day and taking his breaks. The guitar finally got fed up and quit while flipping Walt the bird. Walter even kicked my bass drum about 3 hours in during a peppy polka, I guess he thought I was getting tired, go figure.
 

Pachikara-Tharakan

Silver Member
In fact if he had released Hotel California with an intro similar to what Steve Porcaro does in "Hold The line', I would have liked it too...so whatever he did during the studio recording of his songs, I think thats was how it should be done.

Victim of Love---- the song was recorded Live in the studio with no additional mixing, I dig the rolls in that song....in fact I think there are more rooms in that song for more rolls....may be he left that for basement drummers like myself to explore....
 

drummer-russ

Gold Member
I have no idea how there could be a poor opinion of Henley aside from someone who is bitter with envy or for someone who is shallow enough that they only enjoy a chops master

the guy played solid, beautiful, tasteful drum lines in an unbelievable amount of hit songs

he is what I call a "transparent " drummer...... meaning everything he played was so perfect for the tune that nothing jumps out or distracts from the final product .... only contributes and almost disappears into the song like melting butter on a warm roll
"he is what I call a "transparent " drummer"

This ^.

Which I really appreicate for that type band.
 
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