Left or Right play?

FlamaqueII

Junior Member
I never seem to get very far with drumming until I switched the kit to left handed like me. I spent the last 3 years learning to play left. I can almost really play now. I switched the kit out to right handed the other day and have played over 100 songs now like this. I am playing open handed but switched feet. My right does the kick fine but my left foot just is lost still.

Do you see any reason I should pursue right handed drumming? If I am going to switch now would be better than later. I would like to be able to sit down anywhere and play but not if I suck at it. I am sure I can learn to be better though.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Do you see any reason I should pursue right handed drumming?
Welcome to the forum!

There are only two advantages of left-playing-right.

1: It makes sharing kits easy
2: It makes mimicking other left play-right drummers (Ringo, Bonham, Moon, Beauford) easy.

Ultimately, you should play in the manner that makes you happiest and is most comfortable.
 
I've played open-handed for 25 years and have never even THOUGHT about turning the kit around to lefty OR learn to lead with the right hand, although I do a few right hand leads on my right crash or China. It's most comfortable for me while allowing me to explore other sound sources around the kit while keeping time on hi-hat/ride, which to me is a huge advantage. I would advise finding what's most comfortable first. Once you find that comfort zone, getting better takes care of itself.
 

FlamaqueII

Junior Member
Welcome to the forum!

There are only two advantages of left-playing-right.

1: It makes sharing kits easy
2: It makes mimicking other left play-right drummers (Ringo, Bonham, Moon, Beauford) easy.

Ultimately, you should play in the manner that makes you happiest and is most comfortable.
Funny, some things are just not on my radar. I knew Ringo was Left playing Right but not the other three. Maybe that is why I enjoy playing their stuff so much.
 

Drumolator

Platinum Member
This has come up several times since I have been on this forum. I always respond with this: most of all it depends on which foot feels better playing the bass drum. I am very left handed but right footed. So I play open handed and have for over forty years. With modern hardware one can set up the drums and cymbals almost anywhere you want. Do what you are most comfortable doing. If you put the hats and snare on the left as like most players, sitting in or letting someone else play your kit will not be much of a big deal. Peace and goodwill.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Remember that you don't have to set your kit up like all the others you see.

I have my HH directly opposite from me sharing my snare stand...I can address it equally with right or left hand without crossing(I use a remote hat for this.
 

mikel

Platinum Member
A lefty playing right, all the time, will, all else being equal, not have a weak hand. I am a righty playing right and have to work hard on my weaker left hand. Think about it.
 

Whiskey pirate

Junior Member
I'm a fairly new drummer myself. I started with my kit set up right handed, as that's how the kit is set up where I take lessons. I tried setting my kit up left handed and found I didn't like kicking with my left foot. And I am 100% left handed. I switched it back to right handed and stayed there. The pros are that I can play on any other kit, I like playing open handed, and my right foot now feels natural. Only downside is my fills are slower going to the right. That's just something I will continue to work on to improve my speed. Hope this helps!
 

Elcajon64

Junior Member
A lefty playing right, all the time, will, all else being equal, not have a weak hand.
I'll second this. As a lefty playing righty, I can take off into a fill with either hand and accent with either as well. It makes crossing over easier also.
 
M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
The only thing I do good right-handed is bat. I'm a total left-person. However, I get the advantages of playing on a right-handed kit - I probably would've been in more playing situations if I could play right. BUT - you must do what feels best for you. I don't regret my inability to play on a right-handed kit, and it hasn't stopped me from getting and keeping gigs.
 
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